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Nature Live

December 2009
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With Christmas fast approaching, here in the Nature Live team we were thinking what would be a good subject to cover? Robins, mistletoe, frankincense? No, we decided to go with the story of the whale that swam up The Thames nearly 4 years ago! Sadly it died but did you know that we have its skeleton here in our reference collection?

 

Today we spoke to Louise Tomsett, mammal curator at the Museum, who talked us through the long and somewhat gory process that got it from the dockside into our collection. It took nearly a month and involved stripping and cleaning each of the bones individually in large vats of detergent. To get the really small bones clean they used the Museum’s smallest workers…flesh-eating beetles! It wasn’t until all the bones were clean that they could start piecing the skeleton together.

 

The Thames Whale holds a special place in the hearts of Londoners and it’s good to know that it will be preserved forever in the national collection where scientists researching these fascinating animals can study it.

 

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As part of our Future for Nature season (which has been running on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the past few months) last Thursday I hosted an event about how much oil is left.  Needless to say, it was very thought-provoking.  Andy Fleet, from the mineralogy department, used to work in the petroloeum industry.  He explained how oil is formed over millions of years and how it is found and extracted.  For further information, he suggested visitors have a look at the website of The Association for the Study of Peak Oil and Gas (ASPO) http://www.peakoil.net/  Here you'll discover the debate and discussion surrounding how much oil is left and whether we have reached a peak in oil production....or not.  To give you an idea of the varying estimates, have a look at the graph below.  This shows various predictions for when we will reach peak oil production, the majority of which suggest we have already reached the peak or will do so in the next ten years.  There are a few estimates that suggest a continuing increase in oil production, but whatever the conclusion, one thing is for sure.....at some point, whether today or tomorrow, oil production will decline and we need to be ready with an alternative. 

 

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Graph sourced from The Oil Drum http://www.theoildrum.com/story/2006/11/13/225447/79

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long with Darwin's 200th birthday celebrations, 150 years since the publication of On the Origin of Species and the International Year of Astronomy (marking 400 years since Galileo first looked up at the sky through a telescope).....2009 is also Year of the Gorilla. 

 

To help celebrate Year of the Gorilla, we held an event with tropical biologist Ian Redmond last Tuesday. Ian is a well known figure in the world of gorilla and great ape conservation and speaks passionately about the plight of gorillas and the forests they live in. This year, he travelled to 8 of the 10 countries where gorillas are still found in the wild and wrote a blog as he went.  He also filmed the people he met and recorded interviews with government officials, bushmeat traders and park wardens amongst others. To find out more, visit the Year of the Gorilla website

 

 

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