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Around the Museum

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Have you visited the Natural History Museum recently? Are you planning a visit?

Join us in these forums to discuss our exhibitions, share tips and discuss issues with other visitors and Museum staff and let us know what you think.

Have you visited our Images of Nature gallery, with its stunning images from the 17th century to modern-day CT scans? Have you explored the Cocoon in the Darwin Centre – what did you think? Are you planning to visit our latest exhibitions?


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What's new at the Museum blog

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Apr 4, 2014 Top ten tips for visiting the Museum at Easter

School's out, British summer time has arrived, butterflies are released and the call of the dinosaurs booms loud. If you're coming to visit over the Easter holidays here are some tips to make your trip an even happier one.

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Sensational Butterflies opened last week with the release of hundreds of tropical butterflies into the polytunnel hothouse on the Museum's front lawn. Select images to enlarge.

1. Butterfly rush

Our Sensational Butterflies outdoor exhibition is always a hit with kids and adults alike. Pick up an identification chart to see which species you can spot and follow the activity stamp trail. Look out for the hatchery and feeding table. Dress for the tropics though, it's very humid inside because that's the way the butterflies like it! There's a buggy park outside.

2. Queue busting

There will be queues to get into the Museum in the school holidays, especially if it's raining. Arrive early, for opening time, or later in the afternoon, to avoid the longer waiting times. Britain exhibition ticketholders can use the Exhibition Road fast-track entrance. Inside you may also have to queue to get into the Dinosaurs gallery. To avoid the dino queue, book your free timed visit in advance online. Keep an eye on queuing times via @NHM_Visiting.

 

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Nature-inspired arts and crafts in the Investigate Centre and Crafty Coral Fun workshops.

3. Hands-on activities

We have heaps of free activities for all ages. Try our new Crafty Coral workshop or head to the popular Investigate centre in the basement, which has specimens you can touch, microscopes and more. The Earth Hall's Restless Surface gallery has lots of touch displays for busy hands and the Cocoon includes fun interactives and games. Keep an eye on what's on for kids at Easter for the latest.

3. Refreshments and toilets

In addition to the main eating areas, the smaller cafes in the Darwin Centre and  Central Hall are usually less busy. Bring your own refreshments and take advantage of our basement picnic area. If it's sunny, sit outside and enjoy the front lawn or Darwin Centre Courtyard. The front lawn also has a refreshments kiosk with tables and chairs, but bear in mind there are no outdoor toilets.

5. Cool and quiet spaces

The corridor near the Dinosaurs and Mammals galleries can get crowded. Walk on to the Darwin Centre for the reflective Images of Nature gallery. It has a new Women artists exhibition and the amazing Inside Explorer Table which lets you examine micro-scans of a beefly and angler fish. Further on into the Darwin Centre, the Cocoon offers a lofty experience, with the elegant Courtyard and lovely Wildlife Garden beyond.

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Eggs in the Birds gallery. Ned the Neanderthal in our Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story exhibition.

6. Talking eggs and chocolate

Easter wouldn't be Easter without eggs and chocolate. Don't miss the Bird gallery's display of eggs and nests - the elephant bird egg is enormous - and the free talks with our experts about where chocolate comes from and why eggs, prehistoric and present, are so eggs-traordinary.

 

3. Meet ancient Britons

Our Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story exhibition opened in February to rave reviews amid news of the discovery of ancient human footprints on the Norfolk coast, dating back 800,000 years. Along with two incredibly lifelike models of a Neanderthal and Homo sapiens, this exhibition has surprising insights into our ancient ancestors, with rare archaelogical finds to marvel at. More suitable for adults and older children.

8. Gallery sensations

In January we opened Volcanoes and Earthquakes (formerly The Power Within) and this dramatic gallery is a must-see, not least because of the earthquake simulator. Hang on to little ones when the shaking in the earthquake room starts! The beautiful Treasures Cadogan Gallery, located in the upper mezannine of the Central Hall, contains 22 of our most treasured objects, including Guy the gorilla.

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Earthquake room in the Volcanoes and Earthquakes gallery. Tower of London Barbary lion skull in Treasures.

9. Tours and maps

Pick up the handheld Multimedia guide at the Central Hall's information desk. It doesn't cost much and will give you a great touchscreen tour of the Museum. Explorer backpacks are available at the Central Hall information desk with topic-related activity trails for under sevens. And the behind-the-scenes Spirit Collection Tour of our tank room is best for those who want something more weird and wonderful. Museum maps are available at both entrances.

10. Keep informed

Plan your visit - the Museum is a big place with much to discover. Check our website for what's on and refer to the useful Parent's Survival Guide and floor plans. Links below.

 

Happy holidays.

 

Useful links

Mar 27, 2014 Wildlife Garden springs into action

See what's bursting into life and who's out and about in the Museum's Wildlife Garden in our spring photo gallery below. Everyone who works behind the scenes in the Wildlife Garden team, including some very shaggy helpers, is busy getting the meadows, pathways, ponds, sheds and greenhouses ready for the garden's opening to the public once more, from 1 April.

 

It's also the time of year that the garden and its different habitats require special attention with all the new life in abundance. Frogs have been getting matey and mallards have been checking out the pond's moorhen island.

 

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The Museum's Wildlife Garden opens its gates to the public once again from 1 April with its first public event, Spring Widllife, on 5 April to herald the start of the Easter holidays.

 

The garden will be the focus of lots of fun and nature-filled activities, planned through the coming spring, summer and autumn seasons. And as usual we'll be hosting regular, free monthly weekend events starting with Spring Wildlife on Saturday 5 April.

 

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Pretty red crab apple blossom caught on camera a couple of weeks ago.

 

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Glowing cowslips appearing in the meadows.

 

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Our Greyface Dartmoor sheep, who usually visit from the Wetland Centre in the autumn, have been staying for a few days to graze down the meadow grass. It's the last chance to do this before wild flowers start coming up. By nipping the spring grass in the bud there will be more light for the flowers to come through.

 

mallards-bird-island-1500.jpgMallard visitors exploring the moorhen island lookout on the pond.

 

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Frogspawn was spotted in the garden's pond around 17 March.

 

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Wood anemones have recently come into flower.

 

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Violets on the hedge banks.

 

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Sweet-smelling gorse bushes in the early morning spring sunshine.

 

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White blackthorn blossom perks up the pathways.

 

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Behind the scenes in the garden's greenhouse, staff and volunteers have been preparing seedlings.

 

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The latest green roof in the garden atop the sheep shed was created last autumn. The sloping roof is planted with stonecrops and plants such as thrift, sea campion and sea lavender. More about green roofs coming later in the season.

 

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Alfred Russel Wallace the collector stands watch in front of the Wildlife Garden. His statue was unveiled here last November to commemorate his centenary.

 

Mar 21, 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year in London: a late last chance to visit

This weekend will no doubt be a busy one for the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition in our Waterhouse Gallery. The exhibition closes here at the Museum on Sunday 23 March. However, it's at the later time of 20.00 GMT as we've extended opening for the last day (last admissions are at 19.15 so you have time to view the exhibition).

 

On Saturday, the exhibition also stays open a little later until 19.15, so book your tickets now if you don't want to miss out. On both evenings, you can also dip into tapas at the bar in the Deli Cafe between 17.30 until 19.30. Check out the exhibition page for more details.

 

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Light path by Charlie Hamilton James, runner-up in the Behaviour: Birds award category, WPY 2013 competition. Select images to enlarge.

 

Making one last tour of the gallery this morning, I noticed the tiny details in this vivid shot of a kingfisher taken by Charlie Hamilton James in Gloucestershire. The focus may be the motion blur of the bird's dazzling feathers, but look closer and you'll spot a tiny fish in its beak and another attentive kingfisher far away in the distance (the other parent). That's the joy of seeing these unforgettable photographs close up and so beautifully lit in the gallery.

 

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The magical kokerbooms by Ugle Fuertas Sanz, commended in the Botanical Realms category, WPY 2013 competition.

 

Stars twinkling over kokerbooms on one enchanted night in Namibia is another one - the image comes alive when you stand in front of it. You're beamed into that dream sunsetting scene.

 

To come across a family of endangered Amur leopards in Russia's Kedrovaya Pad Nature Reserve is a rare and extraordinary sight. Valeriy Maleev's composition of the staring leopards caught in the act among the deer carnage, and blending into the pale jagged rocks, has incredible impact close up.

 

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Survivors by Valeriy Maleev, runner-up in the Gerald Durrell Award for Endangered Species, WPY 2013 competition.

 

The exhibition of these 100 award-winning images is already on its UK tour, so even though it closes in London this weekend, it will open in Edinburgh and Cardiff shortly with more venues to follow. The 50th competition winners will go on show in the Waterhouse Gallery later in the year in October.

 

If you've entered the 50th competition, check out the jury who have now started their selection process, with the final judging rounds due in April.

 

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