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Citizen science blog

4 Posts tagged with the natural_history tag
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This week we hear back from Kath Castillo, our Orchid Observers Project Officer, about what orchids you can search for in the field this month.

 

August is nearly here and with it the start of the holiday season, so if you are planning a walking holiday or a bit of wildlife photography in the UK, there are some stunning species on our list to look out for and photograph for Orchid Observers.

 

Flowering now and into late August, the Marsh Helleborine (Epipactis palustris) is a fairly large orchid with loose clusters of pink and white flowers with a white frilly lower petal. The species, which grows in wetland areas such as fens and damp dune slacks, can flower on a grand scale, with tens of thousands of plants creating a carpet of flowers. Although it may occur in profusion in some areas, the Marsh Helleborine is declining in England and Wales due to habitat loss.

 

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A flower of the Marsh Helleborine. Photo credit: Fred Rumsey.

 

 

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Marsh Helleborine photographed flowering in large numbers last summer at Berrow Dunes, north Somerset. Photo credit: Fred Rumsey.

 

If you are up in northern England and in north-east parts of Scotland and likely to be visiting and walking in woodland, particularly pine woods, then look out under the pine trees on the forest floor for small spikes of creamy white flowers which are very hairy! Take a look at the leaves; if the veins are distinctively net-shaped (rather than parallel as in most UK orchids) then you may well have found Creeping lady’s-tresses (Goodyera repens).

 

Please take a photograph and record the location and date and upload your data to the Orchid Observers website.

 

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Creeping lady’s-tresses at Eden Valley, Cumbria. Photo credit: Mike Waller.

 

A similar looking species, but in another genus altogether, is Autumn lady’s-tresses (Spiranthes spiralis) which is found in southern England, most commonly by the coast This small orchid has tiny white flowers arranged in a single spiral around the stem resembling braided hair, hence the common name. An interesting fact is the leaves develop in autumn and photosynthesise throughout the winter but wither before flowering – this is an adaptation to hot dry climates. Germination to flowering takes 14 years. This is a Mediterranean species that only grows on calcareous grassland with very short turf. Look out for it in late August and into September on chalk downs, fixed dunes, cliff tops and even lawns and old grass tennis courts!

 

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Autumn lady’s-tresses at Eggardon Hill in Dorset. Photo credit: Chris Raper.

 

The Orchid Observers team would once again like to thank all our participants who have been out photographing orchids and collecting records from all over the country; nearly 1600 records have been submitted so far!

 

Kath Castillo

 

Kath is a biologist and botanist working as the Orchid Observers project officer and along with the Zooniverse web team developed the Orchid Observers website. She now tries to get out into the field whenever she can to find and photograph wild orchids!

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For July, the Orchid Observers team are simultaneously excited and fretting. We're excited because we're planning field trips to see the next orchids on our hit list, but we're also concerned about the flower spikes scorching in the sun and wilting. It might be a race against the sun this month to catch July's finest orchids. Not only that but this month's highlight species are some of the trickiest to spot and identify. Please don't let this deter you, take up the challenge and see if you can locate and photograph these beauties.

 

Bog orchid (Hammarbya paludosa)

 

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The bog orchid (Hammarbya paludosa) is the tiniest of the UK orchid species. © Mike Waller.

 

Being the tiniest of the UK orchids, the bog orchid can be rather inconspicuous. It's just 4-8cm tall and green and there are only 25 flowers on the flower spike, which are said to smell sweet and cucumber-like.

 

As its name implies this species lives on bogs, growing among clumps of sphagnum moss. It needs to live in areas that don't dry out, even in a hot summer. When the summer is hot it flowers earlier than when the summer is cool and wet.

 

Being a bog plant it's our Scottish contributors that are going to have most opportunity to find this one. But there are a few colonies dotted around England, in Cumbria, northwest Yorkshire, Northumberland, one-site in Norfolk, Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Hampshire and some in the west of Wales.

 

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The bog orchid (Hammarbya paludosa) has very distinct flowers, that small sweet and cucumber-like. © Mike Waller.

 

Frog Orchid (Coeloglossum viride)

 

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Keep an eye out for the frog orchid (Coeloglossum viride) which is found across the UK. © Fred Rumsey.

 

The frog orchid can be found across the UK, but only in small localised patches. It is more easily found in the north and west of the UK, having declined in the south due to changes in land management.

 

It is quite a hard plant to spot as it is only 5-15cm tall and mostly green in colour. But you can find it on short chalk or limestone grasslands in the south, and in all sorts of places in the north, from railway embankments and road verges, to grasslands and dune slacks.

 

The flowers of the frog orchid have a very enclosed green hood and a long red lower lip, which is lobed at the end. It's classified as vulnerable, so please take extra care when you find this orchid.

 

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The frog orchid (Coeloglossum viride) can be found on chalk and limestone grasslands in the south of England. © Fred Rumsey.

 

Now for a last chance to see:

 

Lesser butterfly-orchid (Platanthera bifolia) and Greater butterfly-orchid (Platanthera chlorantha).

 

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Its a last chance to see the greater butterfly-orchid (Platanthera chlorantha). © Mike Waller.

 

Distributed across the UK the lesser butterfly-orchid and greater butterfly-orchid are really quite difficult to tell apart. But here are some top features to help you distinguish between the two.

 

Compared to the greater butterfly-orchid, the lesser butterfly-orchid is shorter, it carries less flowers and it usually flowers a little bit later. It can be found on damp heathlands and moorlands, or in deciduous woodland, whilst the greater butterfly-orchid is found on deciduous woodland and chalk grassland.

 

But the most reliable way of telling the two apart is in the positioning of the pollinia (the pollen bearing structures of the flower). In the lesser butterfly-orchid the pollinia are closer together and parallel to each other, while in the greater butterfly-orchid the pollinia are further apart and slant inwards at the top.

 

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The lesser butterfly-orchid (Platanthera bifolia) can be identified by its parrallel pollinia. © Mike Waller.

 

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The greater butterfly-orchid (Platanthera chlorantha) has pollinia that are further apart and slant inwards.

 

Of the two, the lesser butterfly-orchid is classified as vulnerable, due to large declines, particularly in south-eastern regions, so again please be extra vigilant when locating this species.

 

If you manage to find any of the 29 species of orchid we are conducting our research about, then don't forget to take a photo and upload it to the Orchid Observers project here. And if it just gets too hot to go outside then get online and help us transcribe data from our orchid herbarium sheets.

 

Find out more about our Orchid Observers project and how you can get involved.

 

Jade Lauren

 

Jade Lauren Cawthray is Citizen Science Project Officer in the Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity, where she develops and runs citizen science research projects. Having studied an undergraduate degree in Ecology and Conservation and then a master's degree in Science Communication, Jade is combining her two passions, nature and public engagement, by pursuing a career in citizen science.

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Meet the citizen science team

Posted by JadeLauren Jan 25, 2015

Meet the Museum's core citizen science team. First up, it's Lucy:

 

Lucy Robinson

Citizen Science Programme Manager

 

"Hello! As Programme Manager, I oversee all of the Museum's citizen science activities. My role is to update and promote our existing projects, and to work with our researchers, curators and public engagement staff to develop exciting new projects that support the Museum's scientific research.

 

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Lucy Robinson, worm charming for the OPAL soil and earthworm survey.

 

A key element of the citizen science programme is to support other citizen science practitioners to develop their own projects. We do this by producing knowledge exchange guides and publications, and I regularly represent the Museum at national and international citizen science conferences. I am a member of the global Citizen Science Association and the European Citizen Science Association, within which I lead a working group that aims to share best practice and build capacity in citizen science across Europe.

 

I've been working at the Museum in the field of citizen science for 7 years now, initially on the Big Lottery Funded OPAL project, and now as the Museum's programme manager. I love being at the interface of science research and public engagement, and am fortunate that my job means I'm working alongside world-class researchers. Over the past 7 years I've worked on citizen science projects studying earthworms, lichens, seaweeds, urban invertebrates, microorganisms and many other areas of biodiversity, and I love this variety in my role."

 

Jade Lauren Cawthray

Citizen Science Project Officer

 

"As Citizen Science Project Officer I am responsible for setting up and running citizen science projects here at the Museum. I work with staff from across the Museum, to define a research question, develop the data collection method, produce the resources that support participants in collecting and analysing the data, and communicate the results at the end of the project.

 

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Jade collecting leaf samples in the Bialowieza Forest, Poland.

 

Really important to furthering our work in citizen science is my role in advocating and communicating citizen science and the projects that we run. Not only do we need to communicate to the public what projects they can contribute to and how they might benefit from getting involved, but we also need to demonstrate to research scientists how working with citizen scientists can support them in fulfilling their research ambitions.

 

As both an ecologist and a science communicator, I combine knowledge from both fields to developing public engagement opportunities that support people in engaging with and better understanding nature.

 

I started working at the Museum nearly 3 years ago as a Science Educator, delivering the Museum’s learning offer to school and family groups. I then joined the citizen science team in August 2014."

 

John Tweddle

Head of the Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity

 

"With a background in palaeoecology, I - like Lucy - also worked on the OPAL citizen science programme for many years as OPAL Project Manager. That time was spent developing and delivering new citizen science projects as well as coordinating the taxonomy, public events and exhibitions, and voluntary natural history societies aspects of the OPAL programme.

 

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John teaching identification skills to Cubs, out in the field.

 

I subsequently left my role in OPAL to become Head of the Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity (AMC). The AMC forms a hub for partnership-based UK natural history engagement, training and research, and provides a focus for the Museum’s citizen science programme. Our mission is to inspire and support the development of existing and future naturalists.

 

Projects range from citizen science surveys, to answering public identification enquiries, provision of wildlife identification resources and training, and research into critical aspects of the UK’s biodiversity.

 

The AMC also acts as a free drop in resource centre where UK natural history enthusiasts of all abilities can further their interest by accessing UK reference collections, library materials, microscopes and expertise.

 

I am a founding Steering Committee member for the global Citizen Science Association and a member of the British Ecological Society Citizen Science Special Interest Group."

 

So, that's a quick introduction to each of us. In our next blog post, we’ll introduce you to our latest citizen project... see you there.

 

Jade Lauren

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Welcome to the Museum's new blog about citizen science! Before we get started, we should probably give you a quick outline of what citizen science actually is... here's a snippet from our official blurb:

 

'...the involvement of volunteers in scientific projects that contribute to expanding our knowledge of the natural world, through the systematic collection, analysis or interpretation of environmental observations.'

 

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Cubs learning about British natural history from one of the Museum’s experts at a Big Nature Day event in our Wildlife Garden.

 

And here it is in a little bit more depth... It's at its essence a type of volunteering for the Museum that absolutely anyone can get involved with. Each of our citizen science projects have a specific scientific goal and a flexible approach to participation - you can take part at a time that suits you, at a location of your choice, and either with your friends and family or on your own.

 

Anyone can take part in our projects and we have and have had a wide variety to suit any interest: our current projects include collecting samples of microorganisms for DNA analysis, reporting stranded whales and dolphins, transcribing hand-written registers that detail the Museum's collections, or recording observations of bluebells, orchids, seaweeds or invertebrates.

 

You can find out more about how to take part in our projects here and - of course - by following our new blog where we intend to show you what happens behind-the-scenes and what happens next when you have submitted your data to us.

 

Over the next few posts we'll introduce you to the team and, from that point on, we'll be sharing regular updates and news of exciting developments. We hope you feel inspired to take part and contribute to the Museum's scientific research!

 

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Naturalists sorting and identifying specimens in the field.