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Antarctic conservation

2 Posts tagged with the electricity tag
1

Author: Jaime Ward

Date: 26/03/2013

Temperature: -31 degrees celcius

Wind Speed: About 15-20 knots

Temperature with wind chill: - 49 degrees celcius

Sunrise: 8.30am-ish

Sunset: 8.00pm

 

Despite valiant efforts to comprehensively understand and manage health and safety in Antarctica, danger still lurks, a hidden menace that brings pain and misery to all that live here. It can strike unseen and without warning, leaving its victims both irate and in pain.

 

Travelling the long deserted corridors of Scott Base, the deadly combination of extremely dry air and interestingly patterned polyester carpets becomes lethal, allowing the innocent pedestrian to accumulate a massive static charge, which can only mean one thing. Approach the washing up bowl, flick a light switch or simply reach for a tempting pasty and "crack", its too late. A blinding spark the size of a small planet leaps from your fingertip and leaves you cursing and frustrated, in the certain knolwedge that before long it will happen again.

 

static hair.jpg

A scientist demonstrates the power of static electricity - Jaime Ward

 

On the positive side however, once fully charged you briefly have super hero powers, able to destroy electronic equipment with a single touch, or to become extremely unpopular by gently tapping unsuspecting people on the ear and observing their reaction.

 

penguins.jpg

Some random penguins; naturally untroubled by static discharge - Jaime Ward.

1

Author: Julie
Date: 29/6/11
Temperature: -28
Wind Speed: 12 knots
Temp with wind chill: - 41
Sunrise: August
Sunset August



Wind farm from Crater Hill.jpg

The wind farm from Crater Hill.  Photo: Julie

Scott Base is powered by wind turbines.  Installed by Antarctica New Zealand and Meridan Energy in 2009, the three wind turbines are producing all the electrical power that Scott Base needs, plus a large surplus which is directed to the United States’ McMurdo Station.  More information on the wind turbines is here:
http://www.antarcticanz.govt.nz/scott-base/ross-island-wind-energy

 

An earlier blog entry about the wind turbines is here:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/community/antarctic-conservation/blog/2010/09/14/changing-the-oil-in-the-wind-turbines

 

Part of the Scott Base winter-over staff work programmme is to maintain the wind farm.  Ground temperatures are measured as part of the environmental monitoring at the turbines.  Last week I drove with Victoria, the Scott Base Science Technician, up to the wind farm to take thermistor string readings.  Thermistor strings measure the ground temperature at various depths around the turbines, basically by measuring electric resistance, which varies with temperature.

 

Victoria reads the thermistor strings.jpg

Victoria takes a thermistor string reading from inside the comfort of a truck.  Photo: Julie

There are three thermistor units.  One can be read without getting out of the vehicle, sort of like using a drive-up ATM machine (except that you don’t drive away with more cash).  The other two require actually putting on cold weather gear and getting out of the truck.

 

Back at the base, Victoria enters all data into a spreadsheet and generates an ongoing graph of temperatures with respect to depth.  As you might expect, half a metre down the temperatures follow the air temperatures, fluctuating widely.  However, at 12 metres down, the temperatures remain fairly stable at about -17 C, only fluctuating a couple of degrees a year.