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Antarctic conservation

217 Posts authored by: Conservators
1

Author: Gretel
Date: 18 April 2012
Temperature: Minus 17 deg C
Wind Speed: 4 knots
Temp with wind chill: Minus 21 deg C
Sunrise: 10.34am
Sunset 3.09pm

 

 

In my last blog I posted the Scott Base winter crew recreation of Captain Scott’s last birthday dinner. Apparently some people thought that we did a great job with Photoshop. In fact the entire affair was created from scratch and took many late evenings of hard work by some very talented people. Here I shall give away some of our secrets…

 

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Captain Scott’s last birthday dinner recreated © Steve Williamson

 

The setting for the photo is not the original base hut at Cape Evans but the warm and comfortable lounge of Scott Base. The interior of the hut was recreated by our base carpenter Jodie, using tongue and groove for the wall, and modern pine for the antiquated shelving. Our artistic director, George, stained wallpaper to mimic the ceiling and painstakingly painted the sledging flags with a helping hand from Susanne and myself. Old bed linen was utilised for these and the Union flag, which Naomi very accurately recreated (for an Australian), while overseeing the whole project. Shane utilised the photocopier to reproduce the backdrop from the original image on a large scale from many sheets of A4 paper and a lot of sticky tape. Stef was a master of illusion magicking jugs from blotting paper and aluminum foil, salt cellars out of laboratory glassware and bent aluminium wire, and bone-handled knives from sponge and masking tape; but his pièce de résistance were the soda siphons fashioned from thermos flasks, papier mâché and copper gauze. In fact the only ‘real’ items in the photo, apart from the people were the food and chocolates made especially for the occasion by our chef Bobby. The whole team pulled together to set-up and recreate the scene and get into character for the final photo, captured on camera by Steve the sparky. So much effort went into the mock-up that for now we’ve decided to keep that corner of the lounge as it is.
  Stef and George lounge about rs.jpg
Stef and George lounge about © Gretel

0

Crazy Golf

Posted by Conservators Apr 16, 2012

Author: Georgina
Date: 11/04/12
Temperature: -26c
Wind Speed: 25 kts
Temp with wind chill: -42c
Sunrise: 9:25am
Sunset 4:21pm


At Scott Base we work 6 days a week over the winter, but once a month we get a full weekend off. For the ‘long’ Easter weekend, we decided to get creative and build and play a 7-hole crazy golf course all around the station.  Our crew of 14 was divided into pairs to make one of the holes. My construction abilities don’t extend far beyond cardboard and duct tape, so I was lucky to find myself paired with Tom who is an engineer.  On Saturday we were able to throw together a truly glorious hole called ‘Escape from Rat Lab’ in which the golf ball rolls around through a succession of pipes.

 

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‘Escape from Rat Lab’: Tom revels in the glory of his creation (photo by G. Whiteley, AHT)

 

Amongst the others was ‘Polynesian Putt Putt’ in which you have to hit the ball through a model volcano setting off a musical dancing hula girl. The ‘Turbinator’ was an electric turbine with enormous rotating blades, erected in the computer lab. One of the favourites was ‘The C17’ which involved hitting the ball by the Administration block into a model of the C17 airplane, which then flew down the hallway on a zip-line, before landing on the runway in ‘Christchurch’ (somewhere in the vicinity of Engineering).

 

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Susanne; considering her shot from Christchurch Airport (photo by A. Williamson, ANTNZ)

 

On Sunday we all got dressed up to play in our golfing gear; with plus-fours, tweed caps and rain-macs. Despite a couple of disqualifications for dubious golfing practice, a good game was played by all; a truly memorable Easter!

0

Of What Lies Within

Posted by Conservators Apr 13, 2012

Author: Stefan
Date: 10th April 2012
Temperature: -22C
Wind Speed: 15kts
Temp with wind chill: -41C
Sunrise: 9.17am
Sunset: 4.30pm

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Stefan delving into a tin of 100 year old custard. AHT Stefan

“The constant draw of the fume cabinet whirred steadily like the idling  of a contented bees nest. Nitrile gloves had enveloped my hands without a snag or curse, and the rare sense of ease filled me with anything but. The air was dense with a dull smell, which only rumoured to the true overwhelming nature of what stench could lie within the heart of the looming rusty monolith before me.  Armed only with a spoon, I approached the vessel in a familiar routine of dining, but dear lord this mass could not be stomached. With the lid tentatively removed, the greenish yellow contents emerged like a bad moon rising…custard.”

 

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Tin samples (left to right) custard, salt, anchovy paste, polishing compound. AHT Stefan

 

Emptying  tins is a daily occurrence working with AHT. Depending upon how badly the object is corroded/stained, you get a varying clarity of what you may have to empty and dispose of. The contents are only removed when objects are found to be leaking, and could place other parts of the collection at risk. The majority of the contents are placed in biohazard bags and flown back to New Zealand to be incinerated, yet we always take a small sample to be placed in science freezers, in order that we can research or investigate this material whenever we choose. Anchovy paste (suspected) has been the smelliest sample I’ve taken so far, but my team mates assure me that, chocolate and butter are far worse.

0

Remembering Scott

Posted by Conservators Apr 10, 2012

Author: Gretel
Date: 6 April 2012
Temperature: -15 ° C
Wind Speed: 10 knots
Temp with wind chill: -25 ° C
Sunrise: 8.46am
Sunset: 7.07pm

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Captain Scott’s last birthday dinner 6 June 1911 © Herbert Ponting

On Thursday 29th March 100 years ago, Captain Scott made the last entry in his diary before succumbing to starvation and exhaustion in the freezing cold, on his return trek from the South Pole.

"Since the 21st we have had a continuous gale from W.S.W. and S.W. We had fuel to make two cups of tea apiece and bare food for two days on the 20th. Every day we have been ready to start for our depot 11 miles away, but outside the door of the tent it remains a scene of whirling drift. I do not think we can hope for any better things now. We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker, of course, and the end cannot be far.
It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more.

R. SCOTT.

For God’s sake look after our people."

At Scott Base we marked the momentous occasion with a commemorative dinner. It was a solemn and yet celebratory affair. Speeches  and toasts were made and remembrance given not only to Captain Scott but to all those whose lives have been claimed by Antarctica.

Earlier in the day the Scott Base winter team posed for a photograph to mark the event. We recreated from scratch the scene of the last birthday dinner for Captain Scott, held at Cape Evans on 6 June 1911. According to his diary, that night Scott and his men dined on ‘Clissold’s especially excellent seal soup, roast mutton and red currant jelly, fruit salad, asparagus and chocolate’. Comparing menus I think we at Scott Base had the better cuisine. I’ll leave you to compare the photographs...

 

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Recreation of Scott’s birthday dinner at Scott Base 29 March 2012 © Steve Williams

1

Author: Susanne
Date: April 4, 2012
Temperature: -24.7°C
Wind Speed: 19 knots
Temp with wind chill: -60°C
Sunrise:8:29AM
Sunset: 5:20PM


We all have a special connection with Antarctica, whether it is through a love of the environment and wildlife or in the stories of the early explorers. I always listened in admiration to people who had an even closer connection by being related to members of the early expeditions such as Captain Scott's grandson, Falcon Scott.


After my first season with the Trust in 2008, The Mariners’ Museumhttp://www.marinersmuseum.org, America's national maritime museum, where I worked, hosted an exhibit on some of the early American expeditions and displayed Antarctic material from the collection. One of my favorite pieces was the figurehead from the Bear of Oakland. A fantastic name like that has to have a great story, but little did I realise it would create my personal Antarctica connection.

 

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USS Bear after World War II


The vessel Bear was constructed in Scotland in 1874 as a precursor to modern icebreakers and over the years was used for sealing, commerce, and exploration of the polar regions (most notably on the Admiral Byrd expeditions). Many sources regard her as one of the most enduring and notable polar exploration ships.  She was eventually sold to Oakland, California as a museum ship earning her the name Bear of Oakland. The Bear was originally owned by W. Grieve and Sons in Scotland, which is where my connection lies. The surname Grieve has a strong Scottish history in my family and while I haven’t yet been able to trace myself to the Bear, I still find it very serendipitous!

 

What is your link to Antarctica?

0

Sundog

Posted by Conservators Apr 2, 2012

Author: Georgina

Date: 28/03/12
Temperature: -23c
Wind Speed: 25 kts
Temp with wind chill: -38c
Sunrise: 8:39am
Sunset 7:15pm

 

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Sundog seen from Scott Base (photo by G. Evans, AHT)

 

For the past few weeks, we have been enjoying the rising and setting of the sun in something approaching normal daylight hours.  On Monday we were able to see a sundog, (scientific name: parhelion); a very special atmospheric phenomenon in which bright spots of light appear in the sky on either side of the sun.


Sundogs are created by ice crystals in the air which act as light-bending prisms. When randomly orientated, a complete halo or luminous ring around the sun is created, but at lower levels the crystals (sometimes called diamond dust) become vertically aligned, causing the light to be refracted horizontally.

 

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Detail (photo by G. Evans, AHT)

The spots we saw were like partial blurred rainbows, with the red side innermost. I didn’t get the chance to see one of these when I was last here in 2010, so I feel very lucky indeed to have seen one now.  Sundogs (also known as mock or phantom suns) can be seen anywhere in the world, but rarely as obvious or as bright as when the sun is low on the horizon and in very cold regions like Antarctica.

2

A Game of Chess

Posted by Conservators Mar 28, 2012

Author: Stefan
Date: 28  March 2012
Temperature: -13C
Wind Speed: 5kts
Temp with wind chill: -15C
Sunrise: 8:39am
Sunset 7;15pm

 

The White Knight is talking backwards, and the Red Queen is off her head

 

The night watchmen, having a game of chess. Frank Hurley and Leonard Hussey (Shackleton Expedition) 1915
http://www.spri.cam.ac.uk/library/pictures/catalogue/article/p66.18.28/


With such a diverse set of personalities here on base people have very particular ways of relaxing and trying to form a distinction between work and private time.


Chess is a massive passion of mine, and its ability to open up an ever changing arrangement of problems is something I hold to be special as the winter draws on. Indeed, this desire to create mental scenarios which are not based on reality, is of great importance when sustaining what is rather an abstract existence down here. I often find that people who have the ability to take you on a journey in your mind, is of great relief, as the possibility of that physical voyage is often impossible off base.

 

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Cape Evans chess board (Inspected by Stefan & George) AHT Stef

With this in mind I was overjoyed to realise Cape Evans Hut’s chess board was in this years collection to be conserved, (and my team mates were good enough to let me be the one to work on it). It’s not often you get to conserve an object which has had not only physical interaction but also such thought and mental tension soaked into each black and white square of its fabric.


Depending on which way you look at it, I’m very lucky this season in having George with me, who was somewhat of a chess child protégé in the 1980s. Rumours suggest chess became quite heated upon the old (now empty) Russian base, let’s hope George and I can keep our castles cool.

1

Author: Susanne
Date: March 21, 2012
Temperature: -28.3°C
Wind Speed: 15 knots
Temp with wind chill: -62°C
Sunrise: 7:56AM
Sunset 8:00PM

When I am asked about my Antarctic experience, people are always curious about my favorite part. My answer: the people I meet!


The Antarctic Heritage Trust is logistically supported by Antarctica New Zealand, a government entity responsible for maintaining the base operations at Scott Base and supporting science events. The first time we meet the ten Scott Base crew that we are wintering with, is when we arrive on the ice. It’s always an exciting time since the summer season team is leaving and we are new faces to get to know. Over the past few months, we have spent more time with this spectacular crew and I also wanted to share the rest of their stories with you.


Shane is the Science Technician this year and originally hails from Queenstown, NZ. While his background is in electronics product design, he spends his time on the ice doing weather observations, maintaining the science experiments, and repairing electronics. After talking with Shane, I learned that his favorite part of being here is the winter family and that you can be yourself and find support in each other. He was attracted here by hearing about others good experiences and enjoys meeting and working with the types of people that come to Antarctica.

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Shane at Discovery Point. Credit: Shane.


Naomi is the winter team First Aider and Domestic from Brisbane, Australia. In addition to living in New Zealand for 7 years, she has been attracted to living in different environments and has spent time in Africa and Canada.  Coming to Antarctica is something she has always wanted to do and her favorite part has been the people! With a diverse background as an ambulance volunteer and world traveller, she enjoys the work schedule and hopes to be able to get career experience.
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Naomi at Lake Vanda. Credit: Naomi.


Our winter chef this season is Bobbie from North Canterbury, NZ. Coming to Antarctica was a childhood dream and this is her second season with Antarctica New Zealand. Bobbie has a background in cafes and catering and produces some of the most incredible vegetarian dishes I have tasted. It helps that Bobbie herself is a vegan! She was attracted here by the mystery and magic that the continent holds and appreciates the fact that not a lot of people get to enjoy this opportunity. Her favorite part of the experience so far has been the view from the kitchen window! Not many chefs can wake up to a sunrise over the Antarctic continent!

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Bobbie at Cape Bird. Credit: Naomi.

 

Hayden is the Telecom technician for the season and is responsible for linking us with the outside world! Originally from Palmerston North, NZ, he studied telecommunications and specialised in wireless engineering. Also a world traveller, Hayden wanted to experience the remote ruggedness of Antarctica that few get to experience. During the summer he assisted with several science events and was able to see truly untouched areas such as the Dry Valleys and Darwin Glacier. His favorite part of being here is the entire experience and as he perfectly puts it, “to look out over the ice shelf and see an untouched place of beauty”. Hayden is also on the Search and Rescue team for Scott Base and I know that we are in good hands with his years of experience and his appreciation for the environment.

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Hayden at the Darwin Glacier. Credit: Hayden.


Simon, our fearless winter base manager, is originally from Invercargill, NZ. In addition to leading the base through the winter, Simon serves as field support and coordinates outdoor activities and gear maintenance. With a background in the building trade, he has travelled extensively and worked on sites in NZ and Australia. Wanting to do something he was more passionate about, he pursued ski patrolling and guiding while getting a diploma in ambulance practice. With this experience he heads the Search and Rescue team at Scott Base. His favorite part of the experience here has been the opportunity to get outside and enjoy the beautiful and powerful place that Antarctica is.
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Simon at the South Pole. Credit: Trudie


I have really been enjoying my time here and having the opportunity to spend the winter with such great people. It really is the team that makes this experience so special!


 

0

Author: Gretel

Date: 21/03/12
Temperature: -29.1 deg C
Wind Speed: 9 knots
Temp with wind chill: -48.9 deg C
Sunrise: 7.49am
Sunset 8.08pm

 

While in Antarctica, Antarctic Heritage Trust conservators lodge at New Zealand’s Scott Base, Ross Island. Once described as ‘the best hostel in the world’, Scott Base plays host to some of the top scientists in the world as well as dignitaries such as the King of Malaysia. Many talented people are employed by Antarctica New Zealand to keep Scott Base running and to support the science events that come here to stay while they collect data, carry out observations and experiments. In summer there can be over 100 residents. During  winter the Scott Base personnel consists of only 14 hardy souls. You may be familiar with us 4 AHT conservators so now we’d like to introduce you to the rest of the family.

 

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Andrew (aka The Sheriff) is one of the engineers who keeps the base running, maintaining and repairing the boilers, air handling units, generators and fuel lines on a daily basis. Ever since as a small boy, when he heard the ‘sounds of Antarctica’ on a 45 record (now you’re revealing your age Andrew!) he has relished the opportunity to experience this continent. Andrew loves the challenge of working in isolated environments – previously he crewed super yachts, sailing half-way round the world – and he certainly makes the grade as an extreme engineer.

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Jodie (JC, his second name is Curtis) is on a quest for knowledge – both of himself and the wider world. As the base carpenter his mission is to improve the base infrastructure for greater sustainability. He enjoys supporting the scientists who utilise  Antarctica as their ‘experimental playground’, and in the process learning more about this continent, and consequently the world, from them. Back in New Zealand Jodie runs his own architectural-building business, and organises festivals – enjoying the gathering of the flock and spreading the good word.

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Jeff (or Capt Jack the Pirate as we call him) is here for the adventure, fulfilling a dream he held as a young boy. His task is to service, repair and maintain our very durable fleet – which ranges from a chainsaw to a D6 Bulldozer – taking pride in taking care of the fleet. In the past he has honed his mechanical skills in snowfields and on super-sized sheep stations. Jeff’s Antarctic voyage is sustained by his love of the outdoor environment and the natural world, marvelling at the harsh yet beautiful continent and the vastness of this place.

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Tom (the Tank, see the photo) believes world peace can be achieved through water (or more precisely reverse osmosis). As the water engineer he manages the waste water treatment (aka the P.O.O. plant) and the reverse osmosis plant – where he makes and creates fresh water from seawater. Tom enjoys the changes in Antarctica weather and the challenges it presents.  A lover of wildlife and the natural environment he’s looking forward to getting back to hunting, shooting and fishing in the mountains and the bush of New Zealand.

 

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Steve (colloquially known as Wilbur but I’m not sure why) is a veteran. He’s seen 2 full seasons and this tour of duty is his third winter. As the resident electrician he’s a bright spark and his work keeps many of our vital systems, such as heating, water and energy production on the go. Having worked and travelled all over the world he realised Antarctica was the last continent for him to conquer. He enjoys the variety offered by the job, working with, and meeting good people.


Well that’s the men of engineering at Scott Base. Our next blog will introduce you to the rest of the family.

0

Fire in the Hole

Posted by Conservators Mar 15, 2012

Author: Georgina
Date: 14/03/12
Temperature: -8.7c
Wind Speed: 7 kts
Temp with wind chill: -16c
Sunrise: 6:58am
Sunset 9:02pm


The last few weeks have seen a great many changes as Scott Base has made the transition from summer to winter mode.  The summer is a hectic period of 24-hour daylight when there can be  as many as 90 people on base at any time, made up of science teams and project groups as well as support staff.  Now however, we are down to our full winter complement of 14; a skeleton base crew of 10, plus our 4 AHT conservators.  Officially this change was marked by the flag ceremony, a tradition dating back to 1957, when the youngest person on base is tasked with lowering the old summer flag and hoisting up the winter version; a small pennant-type standard that can better withstand the inclement weather to come.

 

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Flag ceremony at Scott Base © AHT/Susanne


Now, postcards and letters home have been hastily written to make the last mailbag, and last-minute orders of supplies and fresh vegetables have been received.  Finally, last Tuesday our crew gathered outside to toast the departure of the final flight from Pegasus Air Strip. Now there will be no movement on or off the continent until August.  An exciting time for all.

 

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The McMurdo ice pier used during summer for off-loading ship cargo; no longer needed and destroyed at the start of winter with high explosives

© AHT/Georgina

1

Author: Stefan
Date: 13-03-2012
Temperature: -7C
Wind Speed: 15kts
Temp with wind chill: -19C
Sunrise: 6;51am
Sunset 9;10pm

 

 

One of the many pleasures of living on Scott Base is the proximity of some of the most amazing wildlife, just metres off our shoreline. We can often sit in the lounge with a coffee and see Weddell seals lolloping around like sausages of black and grey oil paint on a white canvas.

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Stefan and a lone Adelie Penguin at Cape Evans   © AHT/ Stefan

 

During the ice breakout, blow holes and wider expanses of water open up between the wincing epic slabs of ice and explosions of Minkie Whale breath summon your eyes and nose to their location, breaching up through the puzzle of ice plates.

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Emperor Penguin in front of Scott base  © AHT/ Giddeon

 

Indeed all the wildlife here has distinct and quite dramatic elements to their turning up on base. The odd Emperor Penguin can arrive with no friends, and seem to have a look in its eyes, like it wants you to shout out on a huge Antarctic tannoy (like in supermarkets) “lost Emperor Penguin, could his mother (aka his father) please make his way to the freezer section to pick him up. Please?”. All this makes you realise the epic distances the animals cover, and so so slowly.  I’m still awaiting for my first Orca sighting, but with the ice freezing over, alas, that ship/whale may have sailed.

1

R/V Nathaniel B Palmer

Posted by Conservators Mar 11, 2012

Author: Gretel
Date: 29 February 2012
Temperature: -11 deg C

We had some interesting visitors dock at McMurdo Station recently. The Research Vessel Nathaniel B Palmer landed at Hut Point, as did The Nimrod during Shackelton’s 1907-1909 Expedition. Both ships witnessed Discovery Hut as they berthed, still standing from Captain Scott’s 1902 Expedition. However, there the similarities end.

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Nathaniel B Palmer with icebreaker and Mount Discovery in the distance © AHT/Gretel

 

Nathaniel B Palmer R/V is a 94 metre Antarctic research icebreaker in the service of the US National Science Foundation. Named after the first American to sight Antarctica, she is capable of carrying 37 scientists with a crew of 22, on missions of up to 75-days. Equipped with an array of biological, oceanographic, geological and geophysical components to study global change there is still room for a helipad. One example of her scientific prowess is the multi-sonar which constantly maps the sea-bed as she sails, slowly piecing together the jigsaw of what lies below the stormy seas.

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The Nimrod, under sail and steam, forcing her way through the pack ice towards Cape Royds 1907-09 © Royal Geographical Society


By contrast The Nimrod was a 41 year old sealing boat before purchase by Shackleton and being refitted for his Antarctic Expedition. Despite being a sail and steam boat, she needed to be towed from New Zealand. Her heavy cargo, which included a motor car, live sheep and ponies prevented her from carrying enough coal to get her from Antarctica and back. Towing her as far as the Antarctic pack-ice would help her to conserve coal and ensure the return of the ship.


I wonder what the early historic Antarctic explorers would have made of the fantastic research capabilities of the Nathaniel B Palmer and her ability to weather the Antarctic stormy seas with such relative ease.

1

All Aboard!

Posted by Conservators Mar 9, 2012

Author: Susanne
Date: 23/02/2012
Temperature: -12°C
Wind Speed: 15km/h
Temp with wind chill:
Sunrise: 4:49AM
Sunset 11:14PM

 

 

Believe it or not, even in Antarctica there are tourists! The curiosity and desire to discover new places and experiences is something we all share with the early explorers. We were very excited this past week to showcase our work with passengers from the Spirit of Enderby, operated by Heritage Expeditions.


The passengers were all well travelled and knowledgeable individuals from universities, museums, and non-profits. They are specifically on board to raise awareness for the environmental and cultural issues that are occurring between Stewart Island and the South Pole.

Visiting Scott Base is a large part of their experience and one of the highlights of the tour is the Antarctic Heritage Trust laboratory. Even though we are just starting our season, we still had many exciting projects to share. Stefan, being an avid chef, happened to be working on several kitchen related objects. George showcased some of the newspapers and cards the explorers used (which she has become quite partial to). Gretel displayed the pony accoutrements that have been found at the huts, such as leather straps, and I spoke about wool socks and clothing.

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Stefan and Gretel speaking to a group from the Spirit of Enderby © AHT/Susanne

 

One of the best parts of our job is getting to share what we do with the public. The cruise ships that pass through Antarctica are a great way to show people our work firsthand. It was fascinating to get to meet and interact with such interesting people. They also wrote several fantastic blogs about their visit: www.ourfarsouth.org. Maybe we will see you next time!

2

Antarctic Field Training

Posted by Conservators Mar 7, 2012

Author: Gretel
Date: 14 February 2012
Temperature: -10.8 °C
Wind Speed: 23 knots
Temp with wind chill: -22.1°C
Sunrise: n/a
Sunset: n/a


Now that we are in Antarctica there is a lot to learn about our new ‘home’. Antarctic Field Training teaches us how to camp out in the field as well as what to do in emergency situations where we might have to survive outdoors under unexpected circumstances.


We learn about how to make the best of our extreme weather clothing - layering up thermal underlayers, fleece pants and tops, salopettes, 3 different types of jackets, and a variety of neck gaiters, hats and gloves. Antarctic weather is explained:  the wind can be deadly in conjunction with cold climates: wind speed of 20 knots at minus 10 degrees Celsius results in wind chill temperature of minus 30 degrees Celsius! We are taught about survival bags; these include items such as tents, sleeping bags, primus stoves, dehydrated food and chocolate, enabling survival in extreme conditions for at least 3 days.

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Polar Tents © AHT/Gretel


Finally we spend a night camping in the field. We use polar tents – based on a design used by Captain Scott during his Antarctic expeditions. They are quick and easy to assemble and very stable in strong winds due to their pyramidal shape; snow is shoveled over the tent flaps to secure them, and the tent accessed via a fabric tunnel which can be securely tied up in bad weather.

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Ice Kitchen © AHT/Gretel

 

We had the luxury of an ice kitchen within which to cook and shelter from the wind. Formed from blocks of compact snow and sunk into the ground the kitchen provided a haven within which to eat and relax in the shadow of Mount Erebus.

0

News Team! Assemble!

Posted by Conservators Mar 4, 2012

Author: Georgina
Date: 21/02/12
Temperature: -3c
Wind Speed: 2 kts
Temp with wind chill: -5c
Sunrise: 3.26am
Sunset 12.50am

 


Whoever thought that being at the bottom of the world would open a door into the glittery world of TV glam!  On Saturday, TVNZ presenter Heather du Plessis-Allan and camera-man Byron Radford visited us at Scott Base to shoot some material about life in Antarctica as a feature for New Zealand’s Television One News.  As part of the shoot, our team was asked to talk about the conservation project and some of the conservation work we will be doing over the season.  This proved an excellent opportunity for us to showcase the work of the Trust, and also to pull out some of the more iconic artefacts, many of which we had yet to see.

 

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In the AHT lab: a break during filming. © AHT/Susanne

 

After sprucing up the lab and combing our hair into some semblance of tidy, we each overcame our nerves to be interviewed in front of the camera.

 

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‘Alright, TVNZ, I’m ready for my close-up!’ Gretel works the shoot like a pro. © AHT/Susanne

Here at Scott Base we get one hour of news beamed in each day via satellite, which we can watch during dinner in the communal area. We are yet to learn whether our footage will make it onto national TV, but certainly our eyes will be glued to the box over the next few days.    
 

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