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5 Posts tagged with the wild_planet tag
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On Sunday 11 March at around 5:50 GMT, the Waterhouse Gallery doors at the Museum will close on the current Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition. This year's showcase of winning photos - the 48th one since we set up the competition - has been a huge hit, as ever with this popular show. It was nominated three times during its run as Time Out's Critic's Choice.

 

Over the last few weeks, the exhibition shop has been busier than ever ringing up sales of the 2011 exhibition Portfolio book, calendars, retro cameras, fridge magnets and, of course, the beautiful prints to remind us of this year's winning photographs. It's no surprise that the print that most people wanted to own was of this little cutie, who lives high up in China's Qinling Mountains (where many of us may never travel to in our lifetimes). The Tiny warm-up photo was the runner-up in the 2011 Gerald Durrell Award for Endangered Species.

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Tiny warm-up by Cyril Ruoso captured the vulnerability of China's endangered golden snub-monkeys. The youngster was one of a band of about 70 monkeys living high up in China's Qinling Mountains, surviving on lichen, leaves, bark and buds. This particular subspecies probably numbers no more than about 4,000. The image was the favourite from this year's exhibition print range.

One of the vital things about this exhibition is that in the latest and best photographs of life, and sometimes death, on our planet, we get closer to creatures and corners of our natural world we wouldn't otherwise know about. And in the stories behind the photos and of the individuals who took them, we learn about important things affecting our environment. The overall 2011 Veolia Enivronnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner, Daniel Beltra, is testament to that with his unforgettable Still life in oil image of rescued pelicans from Louisiana's catastrophic oil slick.

 

Whizzing through the gallery one last time - I always wish I could linger more - I realise again how brilliant it is to see these pictures close up and how the back-lit installations bring out all the details, colours and contours so intensely. Working on the exhibition's website as I do, these are things that I sometimes miss.

 

I've got lots of favourites from this year. Here are a couple that will haunt me after my last exhibition visit.

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Fading beauty by David Maitland (above) is incredibly deceptive. It looks like a painting, but the stylishly-shot mass of poppies was photographed on David's local car-park embankment in Wiltshire last summer. Sadly, three days after David captured them in full bloom (before most had seeded) someone weed-killered the lot! So there will be no poppies to brighten up his car park this year.

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Wings of a gull by Jan van der Greef is startling close up with its ethereal iridescent quality. The herring gull's wonderful wing motion and the shimmering stream of water from its legs were taken by Jan on a boat trip in northern Norway. He went to photograph white-tailed eagles, but instead was mesmerised by the gulls. The 2011 exhibition will be remembered for its abundance of breathtaking bird imagery.

The 2011 exhibition has already started its UK and international tour so there are plenty of chances to catch it outside of London.

 

Behind the scenes, the judges of this year's 2012 competition are now shoulders-deep in the first round of the selection process for the shortlist of winners. They have the highest amount of entries ever to contend with - so good luck to them.

 

We'll keep you posted on the Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year website of news on the judging and tour updates.

 

And we're now putting the finishing touches to Wild Planet, a free outdoor exhibition of classic shots from Wildlife Photographer of the Year, opening on the Museum's east lawn on 23 March. Check our website for details of this coming soon.

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Congratulations to 8-year-old Beth Sparkes pictured here, who is the overall winner in the Wild Planet Art Competition organised by Oldfield Park Junior School, following their visit to the Wild Planet exhibition currently on show in the centre of Bath.

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Young Beth with her winning Leopard Cub painting in front of Peter Chadwick's Leopard Cub image at Wild Planet in Bath. Photo courtesy Bath Chronicle

Beth’s picture of a leopard cub was selected from more than 50 pieces of artwork created by the Year 3 pupils. As part of their study of habitats they were encouraged to choose one of the Wild Planet photographs.

 

All of the completed artworks will be on display during the summer holidays in the shop next to the Wild Planet store on Stall Street (opposite the Roman Bath's shop).

 

Oldfield Park Junior School teacher Penny Jenner said, ‘The Year 3 children have shown great enthusiasm for this project. They enjoyed visiting the Wild Planet exhibition and have shown talent and ingenuity in their artwork. We were proud of the results which will be shown in this special exhibition throughout the summer.’

 

Our Wild Planet outdoor photographic exhibition is displayed in Bath’s Abbey Churchyard and along Union Street until 23 September and features images from the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

 

A visit to the Wild Planet exhibition has something for all ages. From cheeky meerkats and baby gorillas, to strolling tigers and snorkelling elephants, children can get close to nature with the large-scale, dramatic images that aim to inspire and educate a new generation of nature enthusiasts.

 

There's also the chance to become a nature explorer by collecting a special quiz from the Wild Planet Store on Stall Street opposite the Roman Bath’s shop, and have fun hunting down the answers. Children who return their completed questionnaires are invited to choose a free Wild Planet postcard from the shop as a memento of their wild day out.

 

Other mementoes of this magical exhibition include affordable gifts for children like their own fluffy meerkat to take home, sticker books and animal fridge magnets. The Wild Planet Store also has Animal Detective; Travel the Globe animal spotting game, crystal growing boxes, pocket microscopes, paint and play African animals, and rock hopper penguin and green turtle jigsaw puzzles for rainy day entertainment.

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As Bath and nearby Glastonbury rev up for the festival season, the odds are on that our Wild Planet beech tree tee shirt is set to become a festival fashion hit. Glastonbury Festival owner, Michael Eavis, seemed very chuffed with his.

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Glastonbury festival owner, Michael Eavis, shows off his 'eco-chic' style with a Wild Planet exhibition tee-shirt in Bath. Photo by Lloyd Ellington of the Bath Chronicle

Wild Planet's stunning outdoor installation of wildlife images has been attracting lots of attention in Bath's busy central pedestrianised shopping area near the Abbey Churchyard, since opening in April. And the striking beech tree design, shown above, adorns several of the high-quality exhibition gifts. The design is inspired by 'Beech in the mist', one of the 80 photographs featured from past Wildlife Photographer of the Year competitions.

 

The full range of gifts is on sale in the Wild Planet Store next to the exhibition and in the Museum's online shop.

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Wild Planet exhibition in Bath brings wild animals and places to the busy city centre and Abbey Churchyard. Select image to enlarge them

Another amazing photograph featured in Wild Planet is 'Rival kings', (pictured below left) by local photographer Andy Rouse (below right on location). Andy has won seven awards so far in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competitions and will give a Wild Planet lecture in Bath Abbey on Thursday 23 June at 18.00.

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From courting penguins to charging bull elephants, Andy will talk about some of his most extraordinary encounters with wildlife and the top locations he's visited to photograph the lives of animals and birds in the wild. He is known as a charismatic presenter, so all budding wildlife and photography enthusiasts if you're in or near Bath on Thursday, make his lecture a date for your diary.

 

You can book your free advance Andy Rouse lecture tickets at the Wild Planet store, located in Stall Street, Bath, near the exhibition. Or email: wildplanettickets@gmail.com

 

Find out about Wild Planet in Bath

 

Browse Wild Planet gifts online


Buy Wild Planet prints including Beech in the mist

 

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Left: 'Rival kings' by Andy Rouse. Highly commended in the Behaviour: Birds category for Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition 2006.

The photograph was set in the icy and eerily beautiful Falkland Islands landscape and provides an insight into the courtship between two king penguins. 'Kings are such  cool penguins... I love photographing them' says Andy.

See 'Rival kings' on display in Bath's Wild Planet outdoor exhibition.

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Right: Explore the exhibition images further in the Wild Planet book, available at the Wild Planet Store and online
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They say the weather’s going to be unpredictable over the weekend, so here are some ideas for indoor and outdoor ventures.

 

  1. zebra-butterfly.jpgButterflies in the house. Wing your way to our Butterfly Explorers exhibition. Just this week some beautiful new species have arrived. The vibrant zebra butterflies are already making their presence felt in the butterfly house and the shy glasswings are still hiding out, but in about 9 weeks these will be much more noticeable. Did you know the zebra butterfly (right) was declared the Florida State Butterfly? And that if you ever decided to eat a glasswing it would have a nasty taste (due to the poisonous sap it sucks on heliotrope leaves). Inside the butterfly house, the vegetation is thriving with bright bromelias and milkweed. Also look out for the peanut plants, a hit with the blue morpho caterpillars. Outside in the British garden, all the border seedlings and nasturtiums are really starting to show. Kids are loving the outdoor treehouse, log pile house and maze in the garden area. So let’s hope the sun shines for some of the weekend.
  2. Butterflies in the cocoon. Continuing on the butterfly theme, and to check that you’ve actually learned something at Butterfly Explorers, head into the magnificent Darwin Centre Cocoon and spend some time at the ‘Organising nature’ butterfly interactive display. Have fun using the touch screen to play at identifying butterfly species. There are lots of fun interactive games and displays in the Darwin Centre. At the Darwin Centre you can also catch a family show or talk in the Attenborough Studio, so check what's on. Browse the Darwin Centre Cocoon highlights on our website.
  3. Wildlife in the garden. This is one of the best times to explore the Museum's Wildlife Garden and after the last 2 weeks of sunshine and recent rain, it's really a pretty sight with the apple blossom and bluebells. The latest excitement in the garden is that a family of foxes and little cubs have been spotted recently, but we can't say where as we wouldn't want them disturbed.fossil-festival-beach.jpg
  4. Life's a beach for a fossil fan. Discover the Jurassic Coast at the free Lyme Regis Fossil Festival (above). Over 20 of our Museum scientists will be there identifying fossils, and leading talks and walks. This popular family event mixes science with music and the arts, on the beach. 'Dead...And Alive!' is the theme of this year's festival, which celebrates the 2010 International Year of Biodiversity. Find fossils in fossil digs, go on 'fossilteering' walks and learn about the seashore. We celebrate some extraordinary fossils in our Species of the Day this weekend.
  5. Walk on the wild side of Brighton. Head down to Brighton seafront and experience our free Wild Planet outdoor exhibition featuring some of the best wildlife images in the world. 80 panels make up this stunning promenade display of winning photographs from past Wildlife Photographer of the Year competitions.
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The amazing Wild Planet outdoor exhibition is unveiled officially today, 16 March, on Brighton seafront.

 

This exhibition presents a selection of the world's best wildlife photographs in a unique way. It lets them loose outside in the open air. Wild Planet will tour cities across the UK, outdoors, and Brighton is the first stop.

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Rajan snorkelling, from the Shell Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2007 competition, is one of the most popular commended images and is on show in Wild Planet

Instead of the confines of art galleries, at this exhibition it's the sea and beach behind you and the historic Brighton promenade stretching out in front. And Wild Planet is free to enjoy.

 

There are 80 large-scale images featured on the promenade installation. They celebrate some of the most memorable images from past Wildlife Photographer of the Year competitions. You can get up close to a dazzling array of elephants and eagles, apes and ants, meerkats and misty beech trees, starlings and snakes, coconut crabs and crocodiles and not forgetting foxes and foxgloves. Each panel features a caption about the image and photographer. BBC wildlife expert Chris Packham helped choose the images.

 

Have a look at our Wild Planet website to get a glimpse of some of the stunning photographs on display and find out more details. You can also read the news story about the launch of Wild Planet.

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The first night of Wild Planet with the installation complete. The exhibition is illuminated until 23:00 daily 

Wild Planet is on Brighton seafront until September. Don't miss it if you're in the area or planning a trip to Brighton. After Brighton, the exhibition will travel around the UK, including Bath in summer 2011.

 

Next to the installation is the Wild Planet Store, selling some really nicely-designed gifts inspired by the exhibition.

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'We are hoping to inspire new audiences in Brighton and around the UK,' says Jess Harris, the Museum's organiser and Head of our Touring Exhibitions. The exhibition is in partnership with Brighton and Hove council.