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4 Posts tagged with the ice_skating tag

It was a star-studded week for the Museum's Ice Rink which opened to the public last Friday.


Singer Leona Lewis performed on the stage overlooking the rink, along with popular boy band The Wanted (above), while skaters spun gracefully on the ice.


The stars were here to launch the exciting Kinect for Xbox 360. The new Kinect motion-sensor gaming system uses revolutionary technology to make it a controller-free gaming experience - you become the controller with a wave of your hand or the sound of your voice.


Among the other stars who tried out Kinect on the night, was TV presenter Kate Thornton (pictured below).


And the great news is that you can try out Kinect in the Ice Rink's Café Bar - there are 2 consoles and helpers to hand.


During the event The Wanted boys also took to the ice for a photo shoot (shown below).


Alex Lawson, our Development manager who helped organise the launch describes the event:


"It was possibly the busiest run-up to an event I've ever seen. The logistics of building stages and platforms on ice in a matter of days were mind-boggling. But it was a great success. Although I think I should have had a pedometer on the night - would love to know how much I walked - at least  miles?!


"The stars even got to enjoy a brief glimpse behind the scenes at the Museum as we walked them round to the Ice Rink site past possibly the oldest object on the planet in our collection - the 4.5 billion-year-old meteorite in the Mineralogy collection."


Read the news story about the Stars on ice Kinect launch


Find out about the Ice Rink


Enjoy these pictures from the night. Select the photos to enlarge them.


Leona Lewis and her band performing at the Kinect launch at the Museum's Ice Rink


Leona Lewis performs


Boy band The Wanted on stage


Need a penguin helper Wanted boys? And skates might help.


The Museum stunningly lit up for the occasion


TV presenter Kate Thornton has a go on Kinect


Hollyoaks actors Matt Liddler (Max) and Darren Jeffries (OB) posing.


Our flaptastic Ice Rink opens

Posted by Rose Nov 4, 2010

It's the 6th year running that we welcome the Ice Rink to the Museum's lawns. Since launching in 2005, it has become a much-loved part of London's winter scene and a magical event that attracts many visitors, old and young, from near, far and wide. It opens to the public on Bonfire Night.


The flaptastic news this year is the arrival of 50 penguins who join us as skating aids (shown above). Of course, these aren't real penguins, but stabilisers for kids on the ice and available for up to 8 years (£4 to hire). No excuses this year then, kids. For adults there are friendly and unflappable ice marshals.




Once again this year, the vintage carousel beams out to all children 'hop on a horse for a fun ride'. (Select the images to enlarge them.)


Later tonight I hope to be enjoying mulled wine (supposedly the best there is) at the launch preview in the Café Bar overlooking the winter wonderland. The Great British Barbershop Boys will be there to serenade guests and maybe my colleagues and I will even attempt a tentative skate on that virginal ice! Along with rumoured celebs like comic Bobby Davro and TV presenter Miquita Oliver..?


Get skating or spectating out there when it opens, we love seeing you practising your synchronised moves on our way in and out of work. And remember if you're a student, take advantage of the Special ticket price + free drink offer on Mondays and Tuesday until 7 December 2010.





The Ice Rink steams off

Posted by Rose Jan 20, 2010
Snow on snow - an extra bit of magic this year

One of my favourite recollections of the Ice Rink this year was our snowy return to work in the first week of January and seeing our outdoor Ice Rink piled up with snow. The ice marshals were working furiously to, well, remove the ice and snow, on top of the ice and snow. Seemed ironic somehow.

But at the weekend, on 17 January, the Ice Rink closed, as it usually does in mid January. No more will we see skaters gliding by on our way in and out of the Museum. Bye bye festive season.


So what happens to the Ice Rink ice (all 150,000 litres of it)? Well it gets steamed.


ice-rink-dismantle2-500.jpgThe event's project manager, Sherri-Louise Rowe, explained the process: "The glycol - a syrupy kind of concoction used in anti-freeze - that usually goes through the chillers to freeze the ice on the rink, is redirected through the boiler truck, heating the pipes and therefore melting the ice. The melted ice then flows away in the drains under the gardens."


And lots of steam is produced as a result.

Three days after the meltdown, all you can see in this recent picture (left) is a little patch of stubborn ice.


The chillers were turned off yesterday. Today the pipe work under the rink was packed up.


Dismantling continues and the interior of the cafe bar is almost stripped. The outside chalets and catering huts have been taken down.


This year's Ice Rink was a really successful one and we had about 110,000 skaters who visited. It was made especially magical thanks to the exciting snow storms we experienced over the Christmas holidays.


Now it's time to replenish the Museum's front lawns for spring and to welcome the next outdoor exhibition.


Dancing on ice at the Museum

Posted by Rose Nov 3, 2009
Ice Age comes to the Museum, once again

In just one day’s time, on 5 November to be precise, we open our popular Ice Rink to visitors. Now in its fifth year, it has become a regular winter attraction at the Museum and in London.


Over the past weeks we’ve been noticing how things have changed outside on the East lawn where our Butterfly Jungle exhibition stood earlier in the summer. The changes seemed to speed up suddenly when the clocks went back.


We can now admire the twinkle of Christmas lights in the tall London plane trees lining the Ice Rink and Museum grounds in the evening on the way home after work.


Last week, the 25-foot Christmas tree was delivered and its lights and decorations were being put up on Friday afternoon. The outdoor catering units have arrived on site and are being set up.


Most importanty, on Friday, 150,000 litres (150 cubic metres) of water was poured into both the main 1,050-square-metre Ice Rink and the smaller 100-square-metre junior rink for younger skaters. This is about half the amount of water it takes to fill a standard swimming pool (10x25m). The water has now completely frozen over and the ice is receiving its final polish today.

This year, the Ice Rink has a friendly new café bar which offers refreshments all through the day and stays open late for drinks at night. The fairground carousel returns for those who fancy a spin and if you just want to watch the action, there’s a great atmosphere on the viewing platform. Students can also take advantage of a special discount on Tuesdays which includes a free drink at the bar.

'Even better than skating in Central Park' said the Evening Standard

If you need skating tips or want to see what's on offer at the Museum's Ice Rink, have a look at our Essential skating information pages on the website. We have a brilliant new video which shows you some highlights. So no excuses, everyone can be a dancing-on-ice star.


Rain, shine or snow, 'tis a magical sight to see the skaters gliding around the Ice Rink outdoors, against the backdrop of our historic Waterhouse building and gardens. I'm sure this year will be as successful and merry as the last.