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2 Posts tagged with the cocoons tag

It's always a pleasure to announce the opening of the butterfly house outside on the East lawn. And I am so glad the sun shone today when the Sensational Butterflies exhbitiion was unveiled officially to the public. I know the butterflies inside the butterfly house love it so when it does.


Sensational Butterflies opened today, 12 April, on the Museum's front lawn

New features in this year's exhibition like the butterfly puddle (below), cocoon handling and a crawl-through chrysalis, are just some of the things to delight children and adults alike.


Left: The hatchery in the butterfly house, where butterfly life begins. Right: Butterfly puddle, where male butterflies sip

But really it's about the butterflies themselves. Watching the different tropical species flutter around so gracefully in all their glorious colours, shapes and sizes, while you marvel at how they sense the world. Trying to identify species as you spot them - there are handy identification charts around to refer to.


Remember to get your butterfly stamper card stamped as you go through each of the five sensory zones. You can pick one up at the ticket desk entrance. Outside in the garden, things are beginning to grow and you can find gardener's tips for attracting butterflies.


There are over 10 different species of swallowtail butterfly (left) in the house this year and as in previous years, blue morphos (right) are in great abundance.


Have a look at the exhibition highlights slideshow to see some of the reasons why you should visit our butterfly exhibition this year.


Enjoy the Sensational Butterflies highlights in the slideshow


Sensational Butterflies is open all through the summer and I'll be updating you with news along the way.


When you leave the butterfly house, check out the butterfly gift shop. If you go with children, of course they won't let you leave until at least one pair of deely boppers is on someone's head.


Tickets for the exhibition are £3.50 each and children aged three and under get in free.


You can book tickets online or buy them at the butterfly house ticket booth.


Another nice thing about today's exhibition opening is the news that a new butterfly species from Peru, the zebra-like ringlet butterfly, has been uncovered in the Museum's collections by Blanca Huertas, our butterfly curator. Splendeuptychia mercedes differs from its closest relatives by having broad stripes on its wings, resembling that of a zebra’s.


'Despite it not being the first time that I have identified a new butterfly species, it is still exciting,’ says Blanca. ‘Almost half of the world’s butterfly species are found in South America, and it is amazing we are still finding new ones there.’


Read the news story to find out about the new zebra-like ringlet butterfly discovery




The sun shone gloriously yesterday in London to mark the opening of our Butterfly Explorers exhibition outside on the east lawn.


Lots of visitors flocked in to the butterfly house, through the giant globe entrance, and the exhibition looks set to be a popular place over the rest of the school holidays and the coming summer months.


Have a look at the new Butterfly Explorers highlights slideshow on our website to see what exhibition treats await this year's butterfly adventurers, young and old. Get ready for a world expedition that's full of wonder, learning and fun, not forgetting 100s of dazzling live butterflies, a delectable feeding table (below), tall tree house and gigantic garden gnome.


As the spring turns to summer, there’ll be more and more butterflies arriving and plants and flowers maturing. Already some of the first magical moon moths have emerged from their chrysalises and more rare species will make the butterfly house their home over the coming months.


This year's butterfly exhibition is part of the UK International Year of Biodiversity 2010 and highlights the variety of butterfly species around the world, their  conservation and theats to their survival.


Go on a journey from the exotic to the familiar...