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Tomorrow, Friday 11 March, is sadly the last day that our Waterhouse Gallery will be home to the winning and commended photographs of the Veolia Environnement Wildife Photographer of the Year 2010 exhibition.

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Chick delight. This photograph is jumping with the joys of Spring. Johan captured the hungry Arctic tern chicks in Látrabjarg, Iceland, Europe's most westerly point. Highly commended in the 15 - 17 years category.

I had one last dash around the gallery yesterday and, as always, was moved by certain images that I hadn’t noticed as much before, like the joyful Chick delight (above), and Laurent Geslin's romantic Paris life (below), with its furry friends enjoying a night out.

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Paris life. Laurent got down on his belly for this dazzling shot of rabbits silhouetted againt the bright lights of Paris at nightfall. Highly commended in the Urban Wildlife category.

The exhibition’s design this year was particularly special because we introduced a new structural framework featuring a white woven fabric backdrop. These changes enhanced the exhibition experience and created a more intimate and inviting setting for the spectacular imagery, helping the photographs look ever-more luminous.

 

Over 124,000 visitors enjoyed the 2010 exhibition here and the last few months were especially popular. Every late night Friday at our monthly After Hours has been a sell-out.

 

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But it isn’t over for the 2010 exhibition. The UK and international tour has already started and if you head west to the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery (right), you can see the photographs there until 5 June 2011.

 

Find out more UK and international dates of the tour on the Wildlife Photographer of the Year website.

 

In the meantime, photographers have until 18 March to get in their images for the chance to be Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011. Find out how to Enter the competition.

 

Who knows what incredible images and wildlife characters await us this year, but one thing’s for sure, there will be a new Young Veolia Wildlife Photographer of the Year as 18-year-old Fergus Gill who won the Young competition for 2 years running in 2009 and 2010 is now an adult! He says:

 

‘Now that I am 18, I must confess I’m excited about moving up the ranks into the adult competition. Whilst I have a lot of work to do if I am to win any awards when competing against such high quality entries, I’m looking forward to the new challenge and where my future work takes me.'

 

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And his tip for being a potential winner: ‘From my experience the best chance of being successful is to get a different take on a common or overlooked species.’

 

If you want a commemmorative book or print of one of your favourite images, visit the online Wildlife Photographer of the Year shop

 

And enter our competition to win a fantastic goody bag of things inspired by the exhibition

 

Left: Fergus Gill receiving his award as Veolia Environnement Wildlife Young Photograher 2010 with his winning image, The frozen moment. The photograph was taken on Boxing Day, 2009 at the bottom of Fergus's garden in Perthshire.
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Who's walking on the wild side? Footprints by Robert Friel

At this very moment, the most outstanding wildlife images from photographers around the world are being mounted for display in their new bigger gallery for this year’s Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2009 exhibition. The popular exhibition of the competition winners, now in its 24th year, opens to the public on 23 October.

 

The Museum's iconic Waterhouse Gallery (home to previous sell-out Darwin exhibition) will enable us to show off the winning wildlife photographs in larger format than was possible in the exhibition's former Jerwood Gallery. This year's event also features an atmospheric new design themed on a pavilion of shadows. Very intriguing. Hopefully I can take a peak soon.

 

Another new highlight of the exhibition experience this year is an audio guide with judges, photographers and scientists comments, and an audio guide for the visually impaired (the latter is a first for the UK).

 

We are also very proud that this exhibition is the most eco-friendly one staged yet, boasting the latest power-saving LED light panel technology.

 

To whet your wildlife appetite, get a preview of the highly commended winners on our website from Monday, 5 October. You can find out who the overall winners are on 21 October.

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Algae, leaf, forest? Think again

Personally, I love the brilliant green image on the website banner. But do you know what the 'filter-feeding forest' - the image's name - really is? Most people reckon it's algae, I think it looks like a weirdly lit under-water jungle, but it is in fact the inside of a sea squirt's mouth. This species of sea squirt, photographed in the Philippines by Lawrence Alex Wu, is fairly common in tropical waters. Alex spent years looking inside the little creatures' mouths to get this ghostly image. It's the chlorophyll of the microbes inside the food-trapping, tree-like water filters that cause the vivid green colour that Alex captured. I just wonder how he managed to get the 3-cm long squirters to be still enough to get his open-mouth shot?