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Top ten tips for visiting the Museum at Easter

Posted by Rose on Apr 4, 2014 11:54:11 AM

School's out, British summer time has arrived, butterflies are released and the call of the dinosaurs booms loud. If you're coming to visit over the Easter holidays here are some tips to make your trip an even happier one.

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Sensational Butterflies opened last week with the release of hundreds of tropical butterflies into the polytunnel hothouse on the Museum's front lawn. Select images to enlarge.

1. Butterfly rush

Our Sensational Butterflies outdoor exhibition is always a hit with kids and adults alike. Pick up an identification chart to see which species you can spot and follow the activity stamp trail. Look out for the hatchery and feeding table. Dress for the tropics though, it's very humid inside because that's the way the butterflies like it! There's a buggy park outside.

2. Queue busting

There will be queues to get into the Museum in the school holidays, especially if it's raining. Arrive early, for opening time, or later in the afternoon, to avoid the longer waiting times. Britain exhibition ticketholders can use the Exhibition Road fast-track entrance. Inside you may also have to queue to get into the Dinosaurs gallery. To avoid the dino queue, book your free timed visit in advance online. Keep an eye on queuing times via @NHM_Visiting.

 

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Nature-inspired arts and crafts in the Investigate Centre and Crafty Coral Fun workshops.

3. Hands-on activities

We have heaps of free activities for all ages. Try our new Crafty Coral workshop or head to the popular Investigate centre in the basement, which has specimens you can touch, microscopes and more. The Earth Hall's Restless Surface gallery has lots of touch displays for busy hands and the Cocoon includes fun interactives and games. Keep an eye on what's on for kids at Easter for the latest.

3. Refreshments and toilets

In addition to the main eating areas, the smaller cafes in the Darwin Centre and  Central Hall are usually less busy. Bring your own refreshments and take advantage of our basement picnic area. If it's sunny, sit outside and enjoy the front lawn or Darwin Centre Courtyard. The front lawn also has a refreshments kiosk with tables and chairs, but bear in mind there are no outdoor toilets.

5. Cool and quiet spaces

The corridor near the Dinosaurs and Mammals galleries can get crowded. Walk on to the Darwin Centre for the reflective Images of Nature gallery. It has a new Women artists exhibition and the amazing Inside Explorer Table which lets you examine micro-scans of a beefly and angler fish. Further on into the Darwin Centre, the Cocoon offers a lofty experience, with the elegant Courtyard and lovely Wildlife Garden beyond.

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Eggs in the Birds gallery. Ned the Neanderthal in our Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story exhibition.

6. Talking eggs and chocolate

Easter wouldn't be Easter without eggs and chocolate. Don't miss the Bird gallery's display of eggs and nests - the elephant bird egg is enormous - and the free talks with our experts about where chocolate comes from and why eggs, prehistoric and present, are so eggs-traordinary.

 

3. Meet ancient Britons

Our Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story exhibition opened in February to rave reviews amid news of the discovery of ancient human footprints on the Norfolk coast, dating back 800,000 years. Along with two incredibly lifelike models of a Neanderthal and Homo sapiens, this exhibition has surprising insights into our ancient ancestors, with rare archaelogical finds to marvel at. More suitable for adults and older children.

8. Gallery sensations

In January we opened Volcanoes and Earthquakes (formerly The Power Within) and this dramatic gallery is a must-see, not least because of the earthquake simulator. Hang on to little ones when the shaking in the earthquake room starts! The beautiful Treasures Cadogan Gallery, located in the upper mezannine of the Central Hall, contains 22 of our most treasured objects, including Guy the gorilla.

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Earthquake room in the Volcanoes and Earthquakes gallery. Tower of London Barbary lion skull in Treasures.

9. Tours and maps

Pick up the handheld Multimedia guide at the Central Hall's information desk. It doesn't cost much and will give you a great touchscreen tour of the Museum. Explorer backpacks are available at the Central Hall information desk with topic-related activity trails for under sevens. And the behind-the-scenes Spirit Collection Tour of our tank room is best for those who want something more weird and wonderful. Museum maps are available at both entrances.

10. Keep informed

Plan your visit - the Museum is a big place with much to discover. Check our website for what's on and refer to the useful Parent's Survival Guide and floor plans. Links below.

 

Happy holidays.

 

Useful links

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