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Volcanoes and Earthquakes has...

Posted by Rose Jan 31, 2014

... blasted open at long last!

 

When alighting at the top of our globe escalator in the Red Zone's Earth hall, from now on visitors will be greeted by an explosion of colour and dramatic installations as they enter the new Volcanoes and Earthquake gallery.

 

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Volcanoes and Earthquakes, our new permanent gallery, blasts open today, 31 January.

 

Alex Fairhead, interpretation manager for the new gallery, gives us an introduction:

 

''The earthquakes are back. Eleven months after our older The Power Within gallery was closed for refurbishment and, after two years in the planning, today sees the opening of Volcanoes and Earthquakes - a new, free permanent gallery in the Museum. In the exhibition we showcase about 120 specimens and objects. With these we explore the origins, geology, scientific understanding and human impact of our planet's most powerful natural forces.

 

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The new gallery has three themed zones: volcanoes, plate tectonics and earthquakes.

 

'For the gallery's design, we took inspiration from the structure of rock strata and continental plates and you can see that in the jutting, layered walls. The exhibition leads visitors through three themed areas: volcanoes, plate tectonics and earthquakes. The final encounter is inside the Museum’s renowned earthquake simulator, a re-creation of the supermarket scene during Japan's 1996 Kobe earthquake.

 

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A heat suit worn by volcanologists towers tall in the centre of the gallery. It can withstand temperatures of up to to 1,000˚C.

 

'There are a few surprises for visitors as they make their way through the gallery. The pink flamingo's feathers hide a volcanic secret, a 4,000 year old copper dagger holds the key to Cyprus’ underwater origins, and a giant catfish that was once thought to be the cause of earthquakes looms large.

 

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In Japanese mythology, the giant catfish was considered to be the cause of earthquakes.

 

'It's a gallery that was always popular with families and schools and we've really enhanced the content for this audience in the transformation. There are interactive quizzes and games, CGI films, touch objects includng a meteorite and lava bomb, and an in-depth explanation of the science behind these epic natural phenomena that have literally rocked our world.'

 

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A shaky final encounter in the gallery's Kobe supermarket earthquake simulator.

 

The Volcanoes and Earthquake gallery is a free permanent gallery. To visit, the nearest Museum entrance is our Exhibition Road entrance.

 

Come and be blown away.

 

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Homo arrivus

Posted by Rose Jan 13, 2014

The arrival of two naked male models at the Museum just before Christmas, unsurprisingly, caused a stir among staff. Cameras to hand, a few in the know caught some early glimpses as our unclad guests were bustled in at dusk. Now we release official photographs of them and a film about their brief yet prehistoric beginnings as the publicity revs up for the show they will appear in.

 

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Meet the Neanderthal (1m 55cm, in his 20s, European origin) and Homo sapiens (1m 75cm, in his 50s, European origin) stars of Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story. These life-size models were created by Dutch artists Alfons and Adrie Kennis. Homo sapiens stands taller, the darker-skinned male who chews a tool used to adorn his body with ink. Select images to enlarge.

 

The models were made by the Dutch duo, Alfons and Adrie Kennis, in their studio in the Netherlands for our next major exhibition, Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story, opening here on 13 February.

 

The Kennis brothers specialise in creating scientifically accurate sculptures of ancient humans and animals. The specially commissioned models blend scientific and aesthetic interpretation uniquely. They pose proudly, faces full of character - and some speculation as to which famous personalities might have been the inspiration - and are sure to attract attention when they take pride of place in the exhibition gallery.

 

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Adrie (left) and Alfons (right) Kennis in their studio, creating our two ancient men of silicon. Watch the short film of their work in progress below.

 

 

 

Our male models will share the limelight in the exhibition with striking graphic recreations of Neanderthal women and children and Homo sapiens family members, amidst more than 200 rare and intriguing archaeological specimens and objects. The story of our beginnings and how we have become what we are today, is one that touches us all.

 

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Graphic of a Neanderthal child reconstruction. Few Neanderthals lived beyond their late 20s. © PS Plailly/E Daynes/Science Photo Library

 

Elin Simonsson, the exhibition's interpretation manager, gives us the latest on its progress:

 

'Opening is only a month away and the exhibition build is now nearly complete. Walls are up and painted, cases and graphics are in place and our two life-size models are now in the gallery, wrapped up and waiting to be revealed. This week we will start the installation of specimens and objects in their display cases, which will really bring the whole exhibition together.'

 

For one lucky person, there's a chance to win a pair of free exhibition tickets and an exhibition book by entering our free prize draw online.

 

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