Skip navigation
0

At the heart of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site is Dorset's Lyme Regis. One of the most famous fossil collecting sites in the world and the home to the famous fossil hunter, Mary Anning. And this bank holiday weekend, it hosts the popular annual Fossil Festival.

FossFest-marquees-with-town-behind-1000.jpgflags-and-lampposts-2-MH-1000.jpg

Lyme Regis Fossil Festival, 29 April to 1 May, on the seaside town's celebrated Jurassic Coast hosts another colourful festival parade, right, like past years.

This year's 3-day bank holiday festival is themed Marine Parade and focuses on the undersea world on our doorsteps.

DNA-extraction-3-MH-1000.jpg

ff-table-of-specemins-1000.jpg

 

Our Museum experts will be there in force setting up in the free Grand Marquee, with displays of fossils and other natural history exhibits (pictured right). Among their offerings willl be the chance to sieve for shark's teeth, pan for gold, and have a go extracting some DNA from fruit. (DNA extraction at last year's event, pictured left)

 

I managed to catch Martin Munt, one of palaeontologists attending, just as he was just arriving yesterday. He told me: 'We've just arrived in a sunny and welcoming Lyme Regis, the marquees are up and I'm looking forward to another fine year at the fossil festival. Colleagues from across the Museum should start arriving tomorrow. I plan to visit Monomouth Beach at dawn, to look for some fresh finds for our table of fossils.'

 

Martin adds: 'We're very pleased to be showing our new model of the dinosaur Baryonyx for the first time. And visitors can also discover sea life collected from the shores this morning.and learn all about earthworms.'

 

Martin joins other eminent Museum scientists including Professor Chris Stringer on Saturday, 30 April, for additional talks.

 

The free fossil festival offers plenty of fossil walks, rock pooling, and nature walks that get you out onto Lyme's famous beaches, and the Fossil Fair, as well as a programme of talks and performances in the Marine Theatre. It's a great family event for all ages and especially for fossil fans.

looking-at-bugs-MH-1000.jpg

Looking at bugs with Alessandro Giusti, Museum entomologist, at last year's festival

Have a look at the Museum's fossil festival event page.


Read our latest news story about the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival over May bank holiday weekend

 

Find out the full programme of what's going on over the weekend at the main Fossil Festival website

Fossil wonders at the Museum and online

If you're in London, visiting the Museum, you can join in our Family Earth Lab morning sessions for hands-on fossil action. Or visit the just-opened Age of the Dinosaur exhibition for some of the biggest fossils around.

 

Find out more about fossils online on our website and enjoy the new pages: the Fossil hunting guide, Fantastic fossils, How to be a Palaeontologist. And examine the extinct Coelophysis in augmented reality

 

There's also a great article by Martin Munt on the Jurassic Coast and the festival in our latest copy of Evolve magazine which you can buy in the Museum or online.


0

Pretty much everything in the Age of the Dinosaur exhibition, which opened today, is big.

 

Huge graphic timeline panels, vast silhouettes of prehistoric creatures, tall palm-like trees, giant skulls and teeth, and of course, towering animatronic dinosaurs. I feel sure this journey back into a world more than 65 million years old is going to be a big hit through the summer months with visitors young and old.

tarby-2-1000.jpg

Children stare in wonder at the 1.5 tonne Tarbosaurus. The last but certainly not the least, animatronic beast in the Age of the Dinosaur's Jurassic zone. This fearsome T.rex twin lived about 70 million years ago.

But there are many smaller wonders in this exhibition to look out for. Weird-looking bugs and insects nestling in the fern-filled Jurassic swamp and rocky Cretaceous desert. Dinosaur eggs - one is actually hatching - that are guarded by an Oviraptor and Protoceratops. Delicate fossil bones. Smells and sounds bouncing around. And snippets of amazing scientific facts and research that even the most hardcore dino boffins may not be familiar with.

 

Sandy Clark, our Visitor Services manager told me about the opening day which happens to be Good Friday: 'The queues in the morning at the Red Zone's ticket desks were probably the longest we've ever had, so there's a real interest in this exhibition. By about 3pm we had sold out. And then we were busy putting up signs to warn people. We actually sold about 2,000 tickets on the day. We had a few refunds I heard, but this was only because children got too scared and had to leave!'

 

giant-timeline2-1000.jpg

One of the huge evolutionary graphic timelines you'll encounter as you start your exhibition journey.

The exhibition gallery is arranged into two main immersive habitats, the Cretaceous and the Jurassic zones, with surrounding and central areas that showcase many spectacular specimen displays, images, fact panels and interactive tables and an underwater CGI film.

archaeopteryx-foliage-1000.jpg

Jurassic zone's, animatronic Archaeopteryx, the earliest known bird.

There are six roaring animatronic dinosaurs and one dino-bird. In order of who you'll meet first, they are: Camarasaurus and Archaeopteryx, both in the Jurassic zone; moving into the Cretaceous zone, there's Protoceratops with Velociraptor, who face Gallimimus, and finally round the corner, still in the Cretaceous zone, are Oviraptor and Tarbosaurus.

cretaceous-creatures-1000.jpg

Cretaceous zone's Protoceratops guards its eggs from the approaching feathery Velociraptor. Tarbosaurus is a shadowy threat in the distance.

protoceratops-skull-1000.jpg

A spectacular Protoceratops skull. There are about seven dinosaur skulls to examine in the exhibition displays

Among the exhibits, you'll find some great interactive challenges. At the Dig It Up and Examine It tables you can piece together the evidence of how we know what the Jurassic and Cretaceous worlds were like. Also check out the kiosks, pictured below, before you leave for the chance to make an online dinosaur scrapbook. If you keep your ticket you can continue your dinosaur and fossil exploration at home on your computer.

interactive-table-1000.jpg

Examine fossils or create your own dinosaur scrapbook at one of the fun interactive tables

Enjoy it. And Happy Easter. You can book exhibition tickets online

 

Find out more about the Age of the Dinosaur exhibition

 

Oh and I'm kinda chuffed that it's my 100th What's new blog on the same day Age of the Dinosaur opened.

0

We held three special previews for the Age of the Dinosaur exhibition on Wednesday, 20 April. As you can imagine, it was a pretty frantic day for all involved. There was a fab response and lots of photos too.

ben-dinosaur-exhibition-1000.jpg

Cheeky Ben Brockman (actor Daniel Roche) star of the Outnumbered TV comedy series, finds his rightful place in front of the exhibition's roaring animatronic Tarbosaurus at the special preview on Wednesday night.

Press and media came first thing in the morning armed with film crews and cameras. Some of you may have caught some of the great coverage in the press and on TV yesterday.

 

Mid-morning, for the first time we invited some of our Twitter followers along with their families to share their thoughts on the exhibition.There was some enthusiastic feedback. Here are some of their comments:

 

'One word 'wow'.

'I'm 27 and I feel 7 years old  all over again this is amazing'

'Mac’s favourite part... Dinosaur poo'.

 

The video review by Euan of the DadTalk blog really sells it for parents of young kids I think. And we enjoyed this blog post and a great set of photos on Flickr.

 

Our thanks to all our Twitter guests who attended the #nhmdino event for their enormous enthusiasm and support. You can read more of what they had to say here on Twitter.

 

Then came the special evening preview where celebrities and children leapt at the chance to appear in a roaring session in front of our biggest and most ferocious animatronic in the exhibtion, Tarbosaurus.

 

Emily Smith, our Head of Communications, says: 'It was a fabulous evening with plenty of fun from dino snacks, a swamp lucky dip to piñata bashing. I was quite scared at first but my mind was put to rest when I realised there were responsible palaeontologists in charge of the dinosaurs.'

 

Read the news story about the Age of the Dinosaur exhibition opening

 

Enjoy the brilliant reviews from some of the kids who also joined the preview night in this video. My favourite is: 'I really like the roboticals'.

 

See some more celebrity photos from the preview night. Select the images to enlarge them

bill-bailey-1000.jpg

Comedian Bill Bailey goes rrrrr

denise-lewis-1000.jpg

Olympic gold medallist Denise Lewis OBE goes rrrrrr

gail-porter-dinosaur-exhibition-preview.jpg

TV presenter Gail Porter and her daughter go rrrrrrr

john-hannah-1000.jpg

Actor John Hannah goes rrrrrrrr

toby-stephens-1000.jpg

Actor Toby Stephens grrrrins

0

In two days from now, our Age of Dinosaur exhibition opens to the public on Good Friday, 22 April. Just in time for Easter weekend.

camarasaurus-ferns-1000.jpg

'I'm not hungry' moans Camarasaurus, the first animatronic dinosaur you'll meet in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition

I peeped into the gallery yesterday to see how the exhibition was coming along. Paul Gallagher, the exhibition's installation manager, is relieved installation is nearing its conclusion. 'Now, the only things left to do are to install the smells and misting machines and complete the final snagging, lighting levels in the two Immersive environments and the showcases. We also need to do some paint touch-ups and set dressing.'

 

As I enter the Jurassic zone, Paul and his team, are busy trying to give Camarasaurus a big bunch of ferns to eat.

 

The enormous lurching head and neck of Camarasaurus is the first encounter that visitors will have with the animatronic dinosaurs in the exhibition. The guys make several attempts to coax the beast, without success. Understandably though, as Camarasaurus is one of the biggest giant plant-munching sauropods and getting close to that mouth looked pretty daunting. From its perch on a rock opposite, Archaeopteryx looks on inquisitively.

proceratops-1000.jpgoviraptor-1000.jpg

Screech and sqwak: Protoceratops, left, and Oviraptor, right - two of the noisiest animatronic stars of the exhibition's Cretaceous zone. Select all images to enlarge them

Moving on to the Cretaceous zone, I'm startled by the noises of the five animatronic dinosaurs in this desert habitat. The sounds are pretty alarming, particularly the screech of Protoceratops and the Oviraptor's cry. Maybe Protoceratops is afraid that the prowling, feathery Velociraptor, not far away, will steal its eggs...

tarby-2-1000.jpg

Of course, the roar of Tarbosaurus, above - the final animatronic dinosaur and T.rex's terrible twin - is awesome. I'm transfixed to the ground, which trembles from the power of that roar, by the gaping teeth and fearsome jaws as the creature lunges towards me. But drawn to it strangely, and imagine myself riding on top of the giant predator for some reason!  I think it's because you get so close to the dinosaurs in this exhibition, it makes them all the more real.

 

It intrigues me how we know about the different dinosaur noises, so I ask Paul and he says: ''The dino roars actually come  pre-set with the creatures from Kokoro the manufacturer, in Japan. We can’t alter them. But we did develop the Archaeopteryx noise.'

 

Georgina, the exhibition's interpretation manager, tells me the noises are actually educated guesswork really. 'Scientists look at similar types and sizes of animal live today,' she says. 'They compare what these sound like and their hearing ranges and piece it together through that.'

 

Paul Barrett, the Museum's renowned dinosaur researcher confirms this: 'Georgina is spot on. We can deduce hearing ranges in dinosaurs though measuring the size of the part of the inner ear that houses the organ of hearing (the size of this is related to the hearing range). And through looking at body size. Comparisons with closely-related animals, and animals with similar behaviours, flesh this out. For example, we know that the hearing range of Archaeopteryx was very similar to that of an emu, crow or magpie, so we selected crow and magpie calls for the animatronic.'

 

Undeniably, it's the six animatronic dinosaurs and one animatronic dino-bird that are the stars of the show.

 

But there's lots more to discover in this exhibition including rare plant and marine specimens, a huge variety of dinosaur body parts, large-scale graphic timelines, illustrations and scientific research panels. Along with interactive challenges and a CGI film.

 

Have a look at the new Age of Dinosaur exhibition slideshow to see what awaits you

 

There will be more news of the exhibition and a video trailer coming soon, so watch this space.

0

This summer, you'll start hearing a lot more from us on the subject of Captain Robert Falcon Scott's groundbreaking Terra Nova expedition to Antartica in 1910-1913.

 

Scott's Last Expedition is our big exhibition opening in January 2012 and we're very excited about this it. The exhibition will show original items that Scott and the rest of the team brought to Antarctica and scientific specimens they collected. The exhibition comes to us from the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia, where it opens this June.
Ben-Fogle-scotts-hut-1000.jpg

Adventurer Ben Fogle in Scott's Hut as it is today, appearing in the BBC Two documentary on Sunday, 17 April, 8.00 pm

But ahead of this, all Scott fans should catch a fascinating documentary this weekend, The Secrets of Scott's Hut on BBC Two. The programme airs at 8.00 on Sunday, 17 April, and follows adventurer and broadcaster Ben Fogle on his intrepid journey across frozen wastes with an international team of conservationists to preserve Scott's hut on the remote Cape Evans in Antarctica.

 

For the documentary, Ben Fogle was given exclusive access to Scott’s hut. He spent a few weeks in the hut with the other conservationists, working and living as Scott did under extreme conditions. Part of their mission was to restore Scott’s weather beaten hut and its artefacts, without disturbing the past.

scott-team-photo.jpg

Captain Scott (centre) and group of expedition members on return of the Southern Party, 13 April 1911. Image courtesy: H Ponting photograph, Pennell collection, Canterbury Museum NZ, 1975.289.28

'Captain Robert Falcon Scott has been a hero of mine since before I can remember,” says Ben Fogle. 'So many books have been written about his race to  the South Pole in 1911, but a century on all this new information is coming to light. It’s an extraordinary opportunity to see a part of Scott’s world that’s been lost for 100 years and to learn more about the man I’ve idolised for most of my life.'
Captain-RF-Scotts-Hut-Exterior-1000.jpg

Outside the Terra Nova hut at Cape Evans as it is today. It was erected by Scott and his British Antarctic Expedition team in 1911. © New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust

In our forthcoming exhibition, visitors will be able to explore the many captivating stories of the Terra Nova expedition, Scott’s last, to Antarctica, including the enthralling journey to the South Pole. But the exhibition also goes beyond this famous tale and explores other aspects of the expedition. Visitors will get close to many of the rare original artefacts that Scott and his team used.

 

Our exhibition commemorates the centenary of the expedition and celebrates its achievements.

 

Scott's Last Expedition is a touring exhibition opening in Sydney in 2011 and arriving in the UK in January 2012. It goes on to New Zealand in November 2012 after closing here at the Natural History Museum in London. Scott's Last Expedition is a partnership between the Natural History Museum, London; Antarctic Heritage Trust (New Zealand); and Canterbury Museum, New Zealand.


Find out about the Scott's Last Expedition exhibition

 

Learn more about the history of the huts, and Antarctic heritage and conservation

 

Follow the Antarctic conservation blog

0

It's always a pleasure to announce the opening of the butterfly house outside on the East lawn. And I am so glad the sun shone today when the Sensational Butterflies exhbitiion was unveiled officially to the public. I know the butterflies inside the butterfly house love it so when it does.

Sensational-Butterflies-wide-1000.jpg

Sensational Butterflies opened today, 12 April, on the Museum's front lawn

New features in this year's exhibition like the butterfly puddle (below), cocoon handling and a crawl-through chrysalis, are just some of the things to delight children and adults alike.

hatchery-1000.jpgbutterfly-puddle-1000.jpg

Left: The hatchery in the butterfly house, where butterfly life begins. Right: Butterfly puddle, where male butterflies sip

But really it's about the butterflies themselves. Watching the different tropical species flutter around so gracefully in all their glorious colours, shapes and sizes, while you marvel at how they sense the world. Trying to identify species as you spot them - there are handy identification charts around to refer to.

 

Remember to get your butterfly stamper card stamped as you go through each of the five sensory zones. You can pick one up at the ticket desk entrance. Outside in the garden, things are beginning to grow and you can find gardener's tips for attracting butterflies.

swallowtail-1000.jpgblue-morpho-woman.jpg

There are over 10 different species of swallowtail butterfly (left) in the house this year and as in previous years, blue morphos (right) are in great abundance.

 

Have a look at the exhibition highlights slideshow to see some of the reasons why you should visit our butterfly exhibition this year.

 

Enjoy the Sensational Butterflies highlights in the slideshow

 

Sensational Butterflies is open all through the summer and I'll be updating you with news along the way.

 

When you leave the butterfly house, check out the butterfly gift shop. If you go with children, of course they won't let you leave until at least one pair of deely boppers is on someone's head.

 

Tickets for the exhibition are £3.50 each and children aged three and under get in free.

 

You can book tickets online or buy them at the butterfly house ticket booth.

 

Another nice thing about today's exhibition opening is the news that a new butterfly species from Peru, the zebra-like ringlet butterfly, has been uncovered in the Museum's collections by Blanca Huertas, our butterfly curator. Splendeuptychia mercedes differs from its closest relatives by having broad stripes on its wings, resembling that of a zebra’s.

 

'Despite it not being the first time that I have identified a new butterfly species, it is still exciting,’ says Blanca. ‘Almost half of the world’s butterfly species are found in South America, and it is amazing we are still finding new ones there.’

 

Read the news story to find out about the new zebra-like ringlet butterfly discovery

 

 

0

There is a new selection of Chinese watercolours from the 19th-century John Reeves collection on show in the magnificent oak cabinets of the Images of Nature gallery.

.lesser-bird-paradise-1000.jpg

Bird of paradise, 19th-century John Reeves collection. One of several zoological Illustrations on display from today in the Images of Nature gallery

 

The Images of Nature gallery opened earlier in January this year and features a temporary exhibition among the permanent Museum images. The temporary exhibits change annually and this year's theme is Chinese watercolours, namely from the collection of 19th-century amateur naturalist, John Reeves.

slow-loris-1000.jpgsacred-lotus-950.jpg

Slow loris and Sacred lotus, also new in the John Reeves collection cabinets in the Images of Nature gallery

The watercolours are too delicate for  permanent display so they change every 3 months, giving visitors the  chance to see about 100 paintings over the year. From today, 11 April, we have the second rotation of beautiful illustrations.

 

Glimpse a few of the new John Reeves zoological and botanical watercolours on display in our Images of Nature highlights slideshow and the new contemporary work (below right) by our Shanghai artist in residence, inspired by the 19-th century Chinese collection.

hu-yun-installation-slide.jpghu-yun-artwork2-950.jpg

Left: Memorialise Memory installation. Right: Untitled. Artworks by our contemporary Shanghai artist in residence commemorate the Reeves collection

The new intriguing piece (above right) inspired by the 19th-century Chinese collection is Untitled. However, I think of it as 'Zebra shopping trolley'. The artist was inspired to create it by everyday objects found in a London supermarket. He stayed in London for 3 months researching the John Reeves collection and the Museum's scientific illustrations. Also catch the artist's video installation Memorialise Memory, commemmorating John Reeves and the original unnamed Chinese artisans who Reeves commissioned.

 

Enjoy the video below which describes his modern response to the 19th-century collection. You can also see it in the Images of Nature gallery.

 

 

A

 

From an introduction to the Reeves collection to dodo painting and wood-block printing, you can also browse our great collection of Images of Nature videos online.

 

Find out about John Reeves in China

0
Last week, on 1 April to be precise, our lovely Wildlife Garden unlocked its gates once more for the public open season. The acre of meadows, chalklands and ponds flanked by trees and garden 'office' sheds are bursting forth with spring life.

bird-cherry-blossom-1000.jpg

Bird cherry blossom has just started to appear in the Wildlife Garden

I popped in earlier in the week to get a breath of fresh air and chat to Caroline, the garden's manager, who took me round to point out the signs of new life.

 

Wildlife-garden-Spring-gate-tall-2.jpg

There are pretty primroses, cowslips and wood anenomes peeping out here and there and the first few bluebells. The blackthorn, Wild cherry and Bird cherry trees are all beginning to blossom.

 

'Frogs arrived in the pond around the middle of March,' recalls Caroline, continuing 'and we saw the first frog spawn around the 22nd. The toad spawn came a few days later. Toads usually follow frogs.' We lean over the large freshwater pond to observe the mush of spawn clinging to the watery bank and spot a solitary moorhen on one of the islands.

 

It's a busy time for nesting birds, but this spring the moorhen has made her nest outside in the open in front of the nesting box provided. Caroline fears for the vulnerability of the nesting family, but won't interfere.

 

I learn that the first holly blue butterfly was seen in the last couple of weeks and the trees resound with the chatter of green finches and magpies.

 

Caroline and her team have been busy getting ready for the public opening of the garden and planning this year's seasonal garden activities and monthly family weekend events. The first weekend event, Spring Wildlife, is on 8 May, so check the website for more information and updates nearer the time.

 

The Wildlife Garden is not only a place for our visitors to enjoy in the spring, summer and autumn. It's also an urban habitat where we record, identify and conserve species. During the winter months, the Wildlife Garden team have been busy coppicing, pollarding, hedge-laying, weeding and planting to extend woodland areas.You'll see signs of their labours when you visit.

 

Find out about the Wildlife Garden on our website


Take part in our bluebell survey this year

 

Join our cherry tree survey

 

Read our latest news story about bluebells

Enjoy some recent early spring photos of the Wildlife Garden. See some of the species you might spot if you visit soon. Select images to enlarge them

moorhen-nest-outside-1000.jpg

Nesting moorhen... tread quietly round the pond

tadpoles-1000.jpg

Common toad tadpoles will emerge in the ponds soon

marsh-marigolds-pond-1000.jpg

Marsh marigolds by the pond

blackthorn-blossom.jpg
Blackthorn blossom

april-cowslips-1000.jpg

Cowslips

bluebells-1000.jpg

The first of the bluebells, these ones look like native bluebells to me...

spring-shrubs-1000.jpg

Willow
white-flower-spring-1000.jpg

Greater stitchwort

primroses-1000.jpg

Primroses

daffodils-1000.jpg

The last daffodil blooms

0

39706_0019x1000w.jpglittle-boy-700.jpg

Yesterday, we welcomed the first young visitors to a special media preview of our Sensational Butterflies exhibition, opening officially next week on Tuesday 12 April. Select images to enlarge them

Sensational-Butterflies-house-tall-1000.jpg

 

Children from the east London Nightingale Primary School (above) got the exclusive chance to enjoy 100s of gorgeous live butterflies getting settled in their newly-decorated butterfly house, which has been magically built and fully foliaged in 5 weeks. Some of the flying beauties even settled on the children, much to their delight, as you can see here. (Actually in the exhibition you're not really supposed to touch the butterflies, but sometimes it's hard to avoid being landed on.)

 

The first batch of about 600 butterflies was released into the house last week and around 1,200 pupae were put in the hatcheries. Today, butterfly house manager Luke Brown tells me: 'There are now about 1,500 butterflies inside. And more will arrive each week throughout the summer. It was a great day for the media event, warm and sunny, and the house is looking fab. The butterflies love it when it's hot and the sun shines outside the house. It makes them much more active inside.'

 

There are 30 butterfly and moth species in the exhibition, but this may increase through the summer months depending on what deliveries we get.

 

Find out about the Sensational Butterflies exhibition

 

Read the blog about some of the new features in the butterfly house this year

 

Read the latest news about the butterfly exhibition

Butterfly-release--luke-30-March.jpg

Luke Brown, the butterfly house manager, releases the first wave of beautiful butterflies in the house this year
0

As I write this blog, I see visions of kids everywhere in schools and nurseries sticking bits of glitter and paper flowers to collage cards, while many of us try to remember not to forget to send a card to our mums everwhere. Yes, it's Mother's Day on Sunday, but spare a thought for the other mothers in Nature.

elephas-maximus-1000.jpg

Elephas maximus to Elephas maximus minor, 'Where's my card? I told you an elephant never forgets'

Both the Indian elephant (above) and African elephant mums' pregnancies last about 22 months and a calf weighs around 120 kg at birth - twins are also common. Then there's the calf rearing and suckling, which is long and slow for 2 to 3 years - a task that falls entirely to the females. But all the females in a group are involved in a calf's upbringing and protection. Elephant mums are definitely worth making cards for.

ocean-sunfish-crop-2.jpgpregnant-fossil-fish-1000.jpg

Sexual Nature exhibition's prolific ocean sunfish mum (left) and the oldest pregnant female on display: 375-million-year-old placoderm fish fossil (right). Select images to enlarge them

Orang-utan mothers spend 4 years caring for each offspring. Sperm whale mothers and their calves live together in groups called nursery pods. In striped hyena families, the females raise their offspring alone and definitely don't encourage long-term support from the males. And ocean sunfish (above) produce 300 million eggs each time they spawn.

 

if you're interested in knowing more of this mumsy stuff and how the female of the species end up becoming mums in the first place, then come along to our Sexual Nature exhibition.You'll also encounter the oldest internally fertilised mother. The pregnant placoderm fish fossil (above) on display in the exhibition gallery is 375 million years old!

 

See the Sexual Nature exhibition video trailer for more highlights

cornwall-bluebells-1000.jpg

 


 

And on Sunday if you're out enjoying the spring flowers, see if the bluebells are out near you and tell us in our just-launched bluebell survey

 

Read the latest news story about the bluebell survey