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Author: Jaime Ward

Date: 26/03/2013

Temperature: -31 degrees celcius

Wind Speed: About 15-20 knots

Temperature with wind chill: - 49 degrees celcius

Sunrise: 8.30am-ish

Sunset: 8.00pm


Despite valiant efforts to comprehensively understand and manage health and safety in Antarctica, danger still lurks, a hidden menace that brings pain and misery to all that live here. It can strike unseen and without warning, leaving its victims both irate and in pain.


Travelling the long deserted corridors of Scott Base, the deadly combination of extremely dry air and interestingly patterned polyester carpets becomes lethal, allowing the innocent pedestrian to accumulate a massive static charge, which can only mean one thing. Approach the washing up bowl, flick a light switch or simply reach for a tempting pasty and "crack", its too late. A blinding spark the size of a small planet leaps from your fingertip and leaves you cursing and frustrated, in the certain knolwedge that before long it will happen again.


static hair.jpg

A scientist demonstrates the power of static electricity - Jaime Ward


On the positive side however, once fully charged you briefly have super hero powers, able to destroy electronic equipment with a single touch, or to become extremely unpopular by gently tapping unsuspecting people on the ear and observing their reaction.



Some random penguins; naturally untroubled by static discharge - Jaime Ward.


For the second week of our trip to South Georgia, our plan was to sample in St Andrews Bay, which is located on the north coast of South Georgia. The only way for us to get there was to pack our bags and sampling gear and get going on a 7.5 hour hike from Sjörling Valley in Cumberland East Bay, across Lönnberg Valley and into St Andrews Bay, descending a long and steep scree slope.


It was quite a hike but at the end, we were rewarded with views on the massive Heaney, Cook and Buxton Glacier as well as South Georgia's largest king penguin colony, with more than 100,000 birds. The hut was also amazing with penguins and fur and elephant seals as friendly next door neighbours.


Sjörling Valley

IMG_8466.jpgLönnberg Valley



First views of St Andrews Bay with Heaney, Cook and Buxton Glaciers


The hut in St Andrews Bay


Here in St Andrews Bay there were also a lot of molting penguins, and it seems that they preferably do this by standing with their feet in the cool stream waters. Because of the huge numbers of penguins, most of the streams had two or three rows of penguins lining the stream shores.



Molting king penguin

                   IMG_8586.jpgPenguins along the streams in St Andrews Bay


While we were in St Andrews Bay, we had a lot of sampling to do. This included a visit to the heart of the penguin colony to collect soil samples. The samples will help us to  evaluate how the microbial diveristy in soils and streams that are heavily influcend by wildlife will differ to sites without penguins or seals. The analysis of the samples will also assist us in understanding how the presence of wildlife is linked to the nutrients that enter the coastal waters.


King penguin colony in St Andews Bay


Soil sampling in St Andrews Bay



                                                                          Water sampling in St Andrews Bay


Author: Lizzie

Date:  12 Nov 2011
Temperature: -7.7
Wind Speed: 14.9 gusting 20 SE
Temp with wind chill: -19

Last night we had the neighbours around for dinner ….yes, despite the isolation there is another camp about 500m away from us, where the American Penguin Scientists Dave, Katie and Jean will be based from mid November through to late January. They are part of an ongoing research programme which studies the penguin populations of Ross Island, looking at breeding habits, population statistics, feeding and foraging patterns and general health and habits of the birds. The colony here at Cape Royds is relatively small, being only about 2000 breeding pairs, but with the ice edge close by this year (about 1km from the colony), food is abundant, and the penguins are sleek and fat and just starting to lay their eggs.
LM blog 12 Nov Image 1.JPG

The sea ice and sea ice edge, Cape Royds © AHT/Lizzie

We enjoyed listening to Jean and Katie tell us about the penguins, and if you would like to know more they have an excellent website, including several penguin web-cams, which can be found at
Meanwhile, whenever we have a calm evening you will find us out after work on the rocky outcrops above the penguin colony, watching the Adelies on their nests, and looking out for the smaller numbers of Emperors who come in to the sheltered spots below the Adelie colony to rest and preen.

LM blog 12 Nov Image 2.JPG  
Emperor penguins through binoculars © AHT/Lizzie


Author: Sarah


Date: 28-02-2011
Temperature: -12
Wind Speed: 20 knots
Temp with wind chill: -32 degree C
Sunrise: 23:01
Sunset 05:13


With the open water, there comes wild life. Jana and I went for a walk earlier in the week to see some the emperor penguins gathering near the base. As we approached them they seemed to be heading back over the sea ice away from us, so we got as close as we safely could and sat down. Within a few minutes a group of about 50 emperors had surrounded us!



Jana surrounded by penguins.  © AHT/ Sarah


I was somewhat concerned, as when kneeling I just about see these great bird eye to eye, and I had heard stories about people being flipper bashed by them. But the great bird just eyed us up and down and sang to us! What an amazing treat, Jana and I have been on a high ever since.  And yes, you are not suppose to go closer than 10 meters, but if the animals come to you it’s a different matter.


Emperor Penguins close up and personal. .  © AHT/ Sarah


Posted by Lizzie


I’m writing this from sunny Cape Royds, looking out onto Mt Erebus, just a small vapor trail visible today from Ross Island’s active volcano. All around me is the sound of a very busy camp - we’ve gone from four to nine! This week Diana, Cricket, JT and I have been joined by Randy (Canada), Jamie W (Scotland), Martin, Jamie C and Al (NZ).

Productivity has shot through the roof, offset by the time it takes to do all the dishes….

Lizzie_Blog_19_Nov_10_Image 1.jpg
From L-R: Jamie C, JT, Martin, Jamie W, Al, Randy © AHT


The last three days have seen the whole team moving artefacts, equipment and supplies from Scott Base to Cape Evans to Cape Royds and vice versa. It’s a big job involving several tracked vehicles, many sleds and the support of Antarctica New Zealand staff, who put in some long days to get us into the field and all set up.

We’ve had some fantastic weather – here’s a shot of the artefacts in transit with Mt Erebus in the background, and not a breath of wind!
Lizzie_Blog_19_Nov_10_Image 2.JPG

The artefacts on the move © Diana / AHT


Similarly to last year, the sea ice edge and open water are visible from the cliffs next to Cape Royds. The Adelie penguin pairs are looking plump, and are busy keeping their eggs warm, and taking turns to head out on fishing expeditions. Meanwhile the humans are waddling industriously about like giant orange and black penguins, returning artefacts to the hut…..