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Author: Julie

 

Date: 8/6/11
Temperature: -17.8
Wind Speed: 42 kts
Temp with wind chill: -35
Sunrise: August
Sunset August

 

 

 

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Repaired historic boxes in situ at Cape Royds © Michael Morrison

 

As Martin has written in previous blogs, his job is to repair deteriorated historic wooden food crates so that they are structurally stable.  If sections of the timber boards are missing, Martin remakes the missing sections and inserts them back into the box like puzzle pieces.  The fills make the boxes more weathertight, and, together with other structural repairs to the box interiors, allow the boxes to carry the necessary weight and to withstand extreme wind and temperature differentials.  As is considered ethical in the field of conservation, the fills amalgamate visually with the original box, but remain distinguishable as new material (they are marked on their interior faces).  In that way there is no confusion about what is original to 1911 and what AHT has added in 2011.

 

 

 

 

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Missing section of timber replicated on box AHT9043.1. © AHT

Martin is using Scott’s Pine (Pinus sylvestris) for the box repairs.  The growth rings of that timber are very close together, making it particularly stable.  Additionally, Scott’s Pine is compatible with the species identified as having been used for the historic boxes, including spruce, pine, and fir. What Martin hasn’t talked about is how aesthetically striking some of his repairs are.  Over time, the new wood will weather to match the old, and the repairs will not stand out visually.  However, when Martin first repairs the boxes, the new and old wood contrast, and the effect can be quite beautiful, like elegantly crafted pieces of sculpture.

 

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Repairs to box AHT9251.1: from an aesthetic standpoint, my favorite box so far.  © AHT

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Posted by: Al Fastier

 

Date: 28 December 2010

 

 

The Carpentry team has spent the last two weeks cladding the roof of Captain Scott’s 1910 expedition base at Cape Evans. The product we are using has been chosen for its durability (an important factor in the harsh Antarctic environment) as well as its historical correctness in appearance. It’s a large job which requires attention to detail, such as welding the rubber seams of the cladding sheets to achieve the correct finish on the edging as used by the heroic explorers.


Fortunately the weather has favoured us, with the wind not interfering with the work and warm sunshine for the most part. A couple of times we have even managed to wear just socks on our feet for the work on the roof which heats up in the sun.

 

Yesterday we completed the cladding on the main body of the roof and it looks fantastic, fitting in well with the rest of the hut’s character.  It will really be something by the time the stables and western annexe are complete!


It is great to be a part of such an important and aesthetically pleasing project for the huts appearance as we approach the centenary of Captain Scott’s 1910-13 expedition.

 

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Cladding the roof at Captain Scott's 1910-13 expedition base, Cape Evans © AHT 2010

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Date: 25 December 2010

Posted by: Jamie Clarke

 

 

Out in the field at Captain Scott’s 1910 expedition base, Cape Evans with five colleagues from Antarctic Heritage Trust, I am celebrating my first white Christmas. The day seemed to sneak up on us without the usual barrage of advertising or carols that you would expect in regular life.


Our morning celebrations started with a leisurely breakfast of fried eggs on toast (a special treat considering that we are in the field).   After lunch we divided into two teams for Christmas games – Northern Hemisphere (Randy, Jam and Martin) and Southern Hemisphere (Al, J.T and myself).   J.T organized the games which included the “stick”, “dunnage” toss, (basically caber toss using spare pieces of workshop timber) and the “rope” game, the final result being the Southerners coming out victors!


In the late afternoon we walked up to the top ridge beside the Barne Glacier to enjoy the sunny, still day and awe inspiring panoramic views.


To top the day off, we exchanged gifts through a previously arranged secret Santa.


All in all a Christmas I will never forget!

 

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  Looking at the view from the top ridge beside the Barne Glacier © AHT 2010