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1 Post tagged with the fossil tag
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The coastline of the English county  of Dorset is spectacular and beautiful. It exposes a long sequence of Jurassic age sedimentary rocks, which are world renowned for their wealth of fossils, ranging from huge marine reptiles such as Ichthyosaurs through to ammonites and minute invertebrates.

 

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Stair Hole, Dorset

 

Beginning with the pioneering work of early collectors like Mary Anning, the area has been a cradle of palaeontology, attracting collectors of widely varying levels of knowledge and interest, ranging from beginners through experienced, dedicated amateurs and professionals.

 

The Jurassic  Coast is now a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site and the Museum is an active partner in public and scientific programmes along the coast. 

 

The Palaeontological Association has recently published a guide to the fossils from the lower Lias of this area, edited by Alan Lord and Paul Davis. Eleven of the twenty chapters plus appendix were authored or co-authored by current and former members of the Palaeontology Department and our Scientific Associates. These include, Sandra Chapman, Diana Clements, Joe Collins, Paul Davis, Tim Ewin, Peter Forey, Nicole Fraser, David Lewis, Alison Longbottom, Angela Milner, Martin Munt, Ellis Owen, Phil Palmer, Andy Ross, Jon Todd, Stig Walsh, and John Whittaker. This new field guide is an invaluable resource for amateur, student and professional.

 

Lord, A. R. and P. G. Davis (eds). 2010. Fossils from the Lower Lias of the Dorset Coast. Palaeontological Association Field Guides to Fossils No. 13. Palaeontological Association, London. 436pp.