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171 Posts authored by: C Lowry
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Recent Publications - March

Posted by C Lowry Apr 5, 2012

Publications for last 4 Weeks to (Search done on 20th March.)

(Search on the basis of ‘Nat SAME Hist SAME Mus* SAME Lon*

Web of Science + TRING)

BOTANY

Levkov, Z. & WILLIAMS, D.M. 2011. Fifteen new diatom (Bacillariophyta) species from Lake Ohrid, Macedonia. Phytotaxa, 30: 1-41.       

Prieto, M., Martinez, I., Aragon, G., GUEIDAN, C. & Lutzoni, F. 2012. Molecular phylogeny of Heteroplacidium, Placidium, and related catapyrenioid genera (Verrucariaceae, lichen-forming Ascomycota. American Journal of Botany, 99(1): 23-35.       

ENTOMOLOGY

Aristov, D.S. & RASNITSYN, A.P. 2012. Revision of the family Idelinellidae, with a review of the Permian Eoblattida (Insecta). Paleontological Journal, 46(1): 49-60.       

Khalaim, A.I. & BROAD, G.R. 2012. Tersilochinae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) of Costa Rica, part 1. Genera Allophrys Forster, Barycnemis Forster and Meggoleus Townes. Zootaxa(3185): 36-52.       

PERCY, D.M., Rung, A. & Hoddle, M.S. 2012. An annotated checklist of the psyllids of California (Hemiptera: Psylloidea). Zootaxa(3193): 1-27.       

MINERALOGY

Biske, Y.S., Alexeiev, D.V., Wang, B., Wang, F., Getman, O.F., Jenchuraeva, A.V., SELTMANN, R. & Aristov, V.A. 2012. Structures of the late palaeozoic thrust belt in the Chinese South Tian Shan. Doklady Earth Sciences, 442(1): 8-12.       

PALAEONTOLOGY

Crompton, R.H., Pataky, T.C., Savage, R., D'Aout, K., Bennett, M.R., DAY, M.H., Bates, K., Morse, S. & Sellers, W.I. 2012. Human-like external function of the foot, and fully upright gait, confirmed in the 3.66 million year old Laetoli hominin footprints by topographic statistics, experimental footprint-formation and computer simulation. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 9(69): 707-719.       

LLOYD, G.T., Young, J.R. & SMITH, A.B. 2012. Comparative quality and fidelity of deep-sea and land-based nannofossil records. Geology, 40(2): 155-158.       

POTTER, T.L., PEDDER, B.E. & Feist-Burkhardt, S. 2012. Cambrian Furongian Series acritarchs from the Comley area, Shropshire, England. Journal of Micropalaeontology, 31: 1-28.       

RUSHTON, A.W.A. 2011. Deflexed didymograptids from the Lower Ordovician Skiddaw Group of northern England. Proceedings of the Yorkshire Geological Society, 58: 319-327.       

ZOOLOGY

BOXSHALL, G.A. & Jaume, D. 2012. Three new species of copepods (Copepoda: Calanoida and Cyclopoida) from anchialine habitats in Indonesia. Zootaxa(3150): 36-58.       

BRITZ, R., Kottelat, M. & Hui, T.H. 2011. Fangfangia spinicleithralis, a new genus and species of miniature cyprinid fish from the peat swamp forests of Borneo (Teleostei: Cyprinidae). Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, 22(4): 327-335.       

GRAVES, C. 2012. Mamilloecia indica (Halocyprididae: Ostracoda) a new genus and species from the Northwest Indian Ocean. Journal of Natural History, 46(9-10): 517-556.       

Jones, R., Brown, D.S., HARRIS, E., JONES, J., Symondson, W.O.C., Bruford, M.W. & Cable, J. 2012. First record of Neoxysomatium brevicaudatum through the non-invasive sampling of Anguis fragilis: complementary morphological and molecular detection. Journal of Helminthology, 86(1): 125-129.       

Kabatereine, N.B., STANDLEY, C.J., SOUSA-FIGUEIREDO, J.C., Fleming, F.M., STOTHARD, J.R., Talisuna, A. & Fenwick, A. 2011. Integrated prevalence mapping of schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis and malaria in lakeside and island communities in Lake Victoria, Uganda. Parasites & Vectors, 4.       

KHAN, F.R., Bury, N.R. & Hogstrand, C. 2012. Copper and zinc detoxification in Gammarus pulex (L.). Journal of Experimental Biology, 215(5): 822-832.       

KHAN, F.R., Keller, W., Yan, N.D., Welsh, P.G., Wood, C.M. & McGeer, J.C. 2012. Application of Biotic Ligand and Toxic Unit Modeling Approaches to Predict Improvements in Zooplankton Species Richness in Smelter-Damaged Lakes near Sudbury, Ontario. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(3): 1641-1649.       

Meijer, H.J.M., Gill, A., de Louw, P.G.B., Ostende, L., HUME, J.P. & Rijsdijk, K.F. 2012. Dodo remains from an in situ context from Mare aux Songes, Mauritius. Naturwissenschaften, 99(3): 177-184.       

Oliver, P.G. & TAYLOR, J.D. 2012. Bacterial symbiosis in the Nucinellidae (Bivalvia: Solemyida) with descriptions of two new species. Journal of Molluscan Studies, 78: 81-91.       

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5th Annual Palaeontographical Society Address

 

Virtual Fossils and the Herefordshire Lagerstatte

 

Dr Mark Sutton
Imperial College, London

 

Wednesday, April 18th 4.15 pm
Flett Lecture Theatre, Natural History Museum

 

 

Three-dimensional soft-bodied fossils represent some of the richest sources of palaeobiological data available, but are often difficult to work with using conventional techniques. Various technologies, both new and old, now exist to recover 3D morphology from such material. Most of these are tomographic in nature, based around the recovery of parallel 'slice images' through the fossil, either directly through serial grinding or sawing, or indirectly through scanning techniques. Reconstruction of tomographic datasets as three-dimensional interactive ‘virtual fossils’ on a computer screen not only provides a practical way to study difficult material, but brings a host of benefits along with it.

The Herefordshire Lagerstätte is a Silurian-aged deposit preserving a range of marine invertebrates in three-dimensions, complete with soft-tissues. These are essentially impossible to extract or image in their entirety without the use of tomographic techniques. The deposit hence provides a testbed and showcase for the ‘virtual fossil’ paradigm; prior to the advent of these techniques its significance was unclear, while after 12 years of ‘virtual’ study it is arguably the most significant invertebrate fossil locality known from Britain. Studies having yielded a wealth of new and often rather unexpected anatomical information on molluscs, echinoderms, brachiopods, polychaetes, and most especially arthropods. New finds discussed in this lecture include a chiton-like mollusc, a horseshoe-crab-like arthropod, and a potential stem-group Euarthropod, but further spectacular animals continue to emerge.

All welcome. Tea/coffee available in the Flett Foyer from 3.45 pm onwards

 

For details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Quantifying Holocene sea-level change in the UK

 

Dr. Tom Hill

Department of Palaeontology, NHM

 

THURSDAY 15th March
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2,

16:00 - 17:00

 

 

When comparing mid twentieth century measurements of annual sea-level rise (c. 1.8mm/yr) to the current observed rate of c. 3.3mm/yr, there is clear evidence for rising sea levels in response to human-induced global warming. But as tide gauge records are only available for the last few centuries, how do we know such changes are indeed human-induced or in fact simply part of natural cycles of sea-level change that have prevailed for hundreds and thousands of years?

 

Biostratigraphic analyses of Holocene coastal sediments from around the UK offer one route through which the elevation of past sea level can be quantified. In southwest England, extensive sequences of interbedded estuarine silts and freshwater peats have accumulated within the Severn Estuary basin, suitable for sedimentary coring and subsequent laboratory analyses. Preserved in abundance are diatoms, unicellular microscopic algae that live in all subaqueous environments, requiring specific environmental conditions to survive. By analysing the diatom assemblages at different depths within the sediment cores and relating the species abundance and diversity encountered to those present along the contemporary Severn Estuary coastline, it was possible to quantify the palaeo-elevation at which the estuarine sediments were deposited, relative to past sea level. Such information yields an insight into the way sea level has changed during the last 10,000 yrs and complements other, more traditional techniques of sea-level reconstruction.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Zoology Department Seminar

 

Parasites and Food Webs

 

Kevin LAFFERTY

Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara

 

TUESDAY 27th March,

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

12:00 -13:00

 

 

 

Ecologists use food webs to help make sense of the complexity of the natural world and the food web has become the key conceptual framework for ecology. Recently, parasitologists have pointed out that parasites make up half of biodiversity, yet are almost never included in food webs.  Here, I will discuss how food webs affect parasites, how parasites affect predator-prey interactions, how parasites affect the complexity of food webs and finally what parasites can tell us about ecological complexity. I argue that most of what we have learned about food webs, and therefore ecology, is incomplete without a full consideration of parasites.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Collection Management Seminar

 

Swop Shop: from one dinosaur to the next!   Museum Professionals skill and knowledge sharing

 

Speakers: 
Rachel Mackay, Visitor Experience Manager, NHM and LMG Share London Representative
Nancy Groves, Editor, The Guardian’s Culture Professionals Network
Julie Reynolds, Blogger, London Museums Group

 

WEDNESDAY 21st March, Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

2.30pm-4.00pm

 


Synopsis:
Established in 2006, London Museums Group (LMG) is the representative group of all museums and the museum workforce in the Greater London area.  All individuals working in and for museums and related organisations in London, whether paid or unpaid, whether directly or as freelancers, can become members of the wider London Museums Group.


LMG consultation in the sector has proved a real hunger for a self-sustaining forum where museum professionals can share skills, knowledge and expertise.  London Museums Group’s Share London is an exciting new scheme that hopes to provide the answer. The scheme aims to support professional and personal development and make the excellent skills sharing that already goes on in the sector more accessible. We hope everyone involved – whether receiving support or giving it – will benefit from developing new skills and making new contacts.

Rachel Mackay, Share London’s Representative will introduce LMG and Share London and show how you can register offers of support and needs through the web site. Offers can be anything from stewarding at events or offering unused equipment to offering workshops, job shadowing and mentoring.


Judy Lindsay, Chair, of LMG published a blog on Share London for the new Cultural Professionals Network Guardian blog space: Museums sharing (with) a passion, and Nancy Groves the Editor will introduce this sharing network of creative professionals and give an insight into how museums can approach the culture journalists at the main Guardian newspaper.


To conclude, LMG Blogger in Residence Julie Reynolds and University of Manchester Professional Doctorate Museum Studies Student, will share human narratives of a skill sharing scheme that involved Louise Tomsett, Curator, Mammal Group, Zoology Department at the National History Museum and Milly Farrell, Curator, Odontological Collection at the Hunterian Museum [housed at the Royal College of Surgeons). Julie’s research focuses on the hidden knowledge around collections and human narratives and the talk will highlight the skills and knowledge shared, the benefits and challenges of the scheme through the curator’s voices and objects in their collections.

The seminar is open to all museum professionals.

 

 

Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.

 

 

Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Zoology Department Seminar

Structural Weakening of Corralline Algae Skeleton in Response to Ocean Acidification

 

Federica RAGAZZOLA
School of Earth Science, University of Bristol

 

TUESDAY 6th March,

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

12:00 -13:00

 

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have risen by over 100 μatm (from 280 μatm to 390 μatm) due to anthropogenic input. The ocean has absorbed about one-third of the anthropogenically derived CO2 which has resulted in a lowering of the carbonate saturation and a reduction of the average global surface ocean pH by almost 0.15 units, a process termed "ocean acidification". These chemical changes are suggested to have direct implications for physiological processes such as photosynthesis, calcification or internal pH regulation in a wide range of marine organisms. To test these effects on marine calcifiers living in high latitude, the coralline alga Lithothamnion glaciale was cultured for 3 months at different pCO2 concentrations. Here we show continued calcification of L. glaciale in undersaturated/high pCO2 conditions but with major changes in the ultrastructure leading to an increase in the total strain energy of nearly an order of magnitude and an uneven distribution of the stress inside the skeleton. This weakening of the structure is likely to reduce the ability of the alga to resist boring by predators and wave energy with severe consequences to the benthic community structure.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

 

Chert on the beach

 

Dr. Lil Stevens,

Department of Palaeontology, NHM

 

Thursday 1st March
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2,

16:00 - 17:00

 

 

 

In 2004 an amateur collector found a dull brown cobble on the beach at Sandsend, part of the Yorkshire Jurassic coast. Hammer at the ready, he broke the cobble into eleven pieces and looked into its interior. It was probably raining, which would have helped him to see small pieces of fossilised plants preserved within the chert, including what looked like reproductive structures. The cobble made its way to Birmingham University and after many months of sectioning and polishing, there began to emerge the most beautifully preserved Palaeozoic plant and crustacean remains I have ever seen.

Contained in the cobble were vegetative and reproductive fragments of an arborescent lycopsid with cellular preservation. The cone fragments were described as Flemingites arcuatus sp. nov. and analyses confirmed a provisional assignment to Paralycopodites stem genus. Associated with the plant remains were many small univalve crustaceans described as Ebullitiocaris elatus sp. nov., the same genus as those found in the Devonian Rhynie chert from Scotland. Extremely rarely for this age of fossil, both internal organs and appendages are visible and show a long morphological stasis and even some features still retained by modern Cladocera.

The cobble has preserved organisms of mid to late Carboniferous age and is therefore ex-situ. Chert content analysis and the level and mode of preservation of the fossils suggests not necessarily a hot spring environment, but a swamp certainly influenced by some sort of hydrothermal volcanic activity that caused rapid solidification. Comparison with other cherts has not helped to narrow down the original locality and it is thought that although the cobble was probably transported south east by glacial activity, it is also possible that it was dumped as ballast on the busy shipping routes around north east Britain, and so could have originated from almost anywhere in the world.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Australia Home to the Oldest Continual Culture

 

Emma Loban and Carole Christopherson

Human Remains Unit, Department of Palaeontology, NHM

 

Thursday 16th February
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, NHM

16:00 - 17:00

 

 

 

For 2000 generations Australia has been home to the oldest continuing human culture in history. For over 40,000 years Indigenous people have explored, discovered, named and lived on the entire land mass and islands of Australia.

 

There are two distinct Indigenous groups of Australia; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

 

Aboriginal people of Australia are not all the same and there is not one language or culture. Within Aboriginal Australia are hundreds of distinctly different cultures that continue to exist today.  Who are the Yolgnu, Wararkbi, Tiwi, Walpiri, Warramungu, Arrente, Kamilori?

 

Torres Strait Islander people are a minority group, within a minority group.  What makes this group of people unique? How many islands make up the gateway to Australia? What are their connections to the Australian mainland?

 

Although two groups of distinct peoples, what are the similarities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders? Join us in a presentation about Indigenous Australia and the Diversity of people. Carol and Emma will explore shared history, geography, linguistics, kinship, world views, Indigenous perspectives on repatriation and their work here at The Natural History Museum.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Collection Management Seminar

 

 

Are we there yet? Maps and geographic information at the NHM : findings of the Library Map Collections Review

When?

 

April Carlucci

Library and Archives, NHM

 

Thursday 23rd February 2012

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

2.30pm-4.00pm

 

 

Synopsis:
With more than twenty years experience working with maps in libraries, April joined the NHM in June 2011 to conduct a review of the Library’s map collections, as part of the Library’s ongoing strategy work, and now feeding into the Director of Science’s  working groups. The remit of the Review is to assess the Library’s current collections; talk with Science and Public Engagement colleagues about their needs for geographic information and how those needs are being met; to place the Museum’s map collections in their national and international contexts; and to identify opportunities for partnerships, cooperative ventures and revenue generation. April discusses her findings, including the remarkably consistent needs for geographic information across the Science departments; what other natural history museums are doing in this area; what resources are being missed; and the risks to the collections, research and engaging the public that are being taken with the current approach. The Review concludes in March, and, as a work still in progress, she is eager to hear comments  on her findings from all those in the Museum who use cartographic and geographic information in their work.

 

The seminar is open to all NHM staff  and we also welcome colleagues from other institutions who would find the seminar of interest. There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.


Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.

 

Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk)

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Hunting down Quaternary mammals on Eastern Mediterranean islands: surveying Crete for seven years

Dr. George Iliopoulos

Department of Geology

University of Patras

 

Thursday 9th February
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, NHM

16:00 - 17:00

 

 

In 1745, Pococke reported the first fossil bone findings from Crete Island, discovered in the Agios Georgios Cave (Akrotiri peninsula) in Western Crete. For more than 250 years the island has been widely acknowledged as an important and popular place for the study of endemic island faunas. All these years, several workers have surveyed the island, discovering tens of fossiliferous Pleistocene localities. Until 2000, 75 mammal localities had been reported from the island. In the last 12 years 37 new localities have been discovered, raising the number of known localities to 112. The vast majority of these localities were discovered by systematic surveying on the Island by the Palaeontology group of the Natural History Museum of Crete. We employed caving and climbing techniques to access deep potholes and rocky cliffs and getting ‘extreme’ helped us discover new localities. Fossiliferous localities were discovered on southern and mountainous areas of Central Crete, where there were no previous reports. The new localities brought new findings such as the new Middle Pleistocene deer from Katharo plato and a Middle Pleistocene otter from Cape Malekas. Therefore, new localities provide new data and thus the Quaternary history of the Island needs to be reviewed and rewritten.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Microbialites & environmental change at the Permian-Triassic boundary:  past & future?

Dr. Stephen Kerhsaw,

Institute for the Environment, Brunel University

 

Thursday 2nd February
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2,  NHM

16:00 - 17:00

 

 

Permian–Triassic boundary microbialites (PTBMs) are thin (0.05–15 m) carbonates formed after the end- Permian mass extinction. They comprise Renalcis-group calcimicrobes, microbially mediated micrite, presumed inorganic micrite, calcite cement, and shelly faunas. PTBMs are abundant in low-latitude shallow-marine carbonate shelves in central Tethyan continents but are rare in higher latitudes, likely inhibited by clastic supply on Pangaea margins. PTBMs occupied broadly similar environments to Late Permian reefs in Tethys, but extended into deeper waters. Late Permian reefs are also rich in microbes (and cements), so post-extinction seawater carbonate saturation was likely similar to the Late Permian. However, PTBMs lack widespread abundant inorganic carbonate cement fans, so a previous interpretation that anoxic bicarbonate-rich water upwelled to rapidly increase carbonate saturation of shallow seawater, post-extinction, is problematic. Preliminary pyrite framboid evidence shows anoxia in PTBM facies, but interbedded shelly faunas indicate oxygenated water, perhaps there was short-term pulsing of normally saturated anoxic water from the oxygen-minimum zone to surface waters. In Tethys, PTBMs show geographic variations: (i) in south China, PTBMs are mostly thrombolites in open shelf settings, largely recrystallised, with remnant structure of Renalcis-group calcimicrobes; (ii) in south Turkey, in shallow waters, stromatolites and thrombolites, lacking calcimicrobes, are interbedded, likely depth-controlled; and (iii) in the Middle East, especially Iran, stromatolites and thrombolites occur in different sites on open shelves, where controls are unclear. Thus, PTBMs were under more complex control than previously portrayed, with local facies control playing a significant role in their structure and composition.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Recent NHM Research Publications

Posted by C Lowry Jan 24, 2012

Publications for last 4 weeks (Search done on 12th January.)

 

(Search on the basis of ‘Nat SAME Hist SAME Mus* SAME Lon*
Web of Science)


BOTANY

 

Davis, A.P., TOSH, J., Ruch, N. & Fay, M.F. 2011. Growing coffee: Psilanthus (Rubiaceae) subsumed on the basis of molecular and morphological data; implications for the size, morphology, distribution and evolutionary history of Coffea. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 167(4): 357-377.  [Externally funded]

 

Fiz-Palacios, O., SCHNEIDER, H., Heinrichs, J. & Savolainen, V. 2011. Diversification of land plants: insights from a family-level phylogenetic analysis. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 11.  [Core funded]


GUEIDAN, C., THUS, H. & Perez-Ortega, S. 2011. Phylogenetic position of the brown algae-associated lichenized fungus Verrucaria tavaresiae (Verrucariaceae). Bryologist, 114(3): 563-569.  [Core funded]

 

HAWKSWORTH, D.L. 2011. Biodiversity and conservation of insects and other invertebrates. Biodiversity and Conservation, 20(13): 2863-2866.  [Scientific Associate]

 

KNAPP, S., McNeill, J. & Turland, N.J. 2011. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourneuwhat does e-publication mean for you? Cladistics, 27(6): 653-656.  [Core funded]

 

Souffreau, C., Verbruggen, H., Wolfe, A.P., Vanormelingen, P., Siver, P.A., COX, E.J., Mann, D.G., Van de Vijver, B., Sabbe, K. & Vyverman, W. 2011. A time-calibrated multi-gene phylogeny of the diatom genus Pinnularia. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 61(3): 866-879.  [Core funded/Scientific Associate]

 

Wei, Y.G., MONRO, A.K. & Wang, W.T. 2011. Additions to the Flora of China: seven new species of Elatostema (Urticaceae) from the karst landscapes of Guangxi and Yunnan. Phytotaxa, 29: 1-27.  [Core funded]

 

ENTOMOLOGY

 

BLACKMAN, R.L., Sorin, M. & Miyazaki, M. 2011. Sexual morphs and colour variants of Aphis (formerly Toxoptera) odinae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) in Japan. Zootaxa(3110): 53-60.  [Scientific Associate]

 

Castillo, C., Saaksjarvi, I.E., Bennett, A.M.R. & BROAD, G.R. 2011. First record of Acaenitinae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) from South America with description of a new species and a key to the world species of Arotes Gravenhorst. Zookeys(137): 77-88.  [Core funded]

 

KUHLMANN, M., Gess, F.W., Koch, F. & Gess, S.K. 2011. Southern African osmiine bees: taxonomic notes, two new species, a key to Wainia, and biological observations (Hymenoptera: Anthophila: Megachilidae). Zootaxa(3108): 1-24.  [Core funded]

 

Sorokina, V.S. & PONT, A.C. 2011. Fanniidae and Muscidae (Insecta, Diptera) associated with burrows of the Altai Mountains Marmot (Marmota baibacina baibacina Kastschenko, 1899) in Siberia, with the description of new species. Zootaxa(3118): 31-44.  [Scientific Associate]

 

MINERALOGY

 

KNIGHT, K.S. 2011. Structural and thermoelastic study of the protonic conducting perovskite SrCe(0.95)Yb(0.05)O(xi) (xi similar to 3) between 373 K and 1273 K. Journal of Electroceramics, 27(3-4): 143-153.  [Scientific Associate]

 

McKeown, N.K., Bishop, J.L., CUADROS, J., Hillier, S., Amador, E., Makarewicz, H.D., Parente, M. & Silver, E.A. 2011. Interpretation of reflectance spectra of clay mineral-silica mixtures: implications for Martian clay mineralogy at Mawrth Vallis. Clays and Clay Minerals, 59(4): 400-415.  [Core funded]

 

STEELE, R.C.J., Elliott, T., Coath, C.D. & Regelous, M. 2011. Confirmation of mass-independent Ni isotopic variability in iron meteorites. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 75(24): 7906-7925.  [PhD student]

 

PALAEONTOLOGY

 

Hutchinson, J.R., DELMER, C., Miller, C.E., Hildebrandt, T., Pitsillides, A.A. & Boyde, A. 2011. From Flat Foot to Fat Foot: Structure, Ontogeny, Function, and Evolution of Elephant "Sixth Toes". Science, 334(6063): 1699-1703.  [Core funded]

 

Nitsch, E.K., HUMPHREY, L.T. & Hedges, R.E.M. 2011. Using Stable Isotope Analysis to Examine the Effect of Economic Change on Breastfeeding Practices in Spitalfields, London, UK. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 146(4): 619-628.  [Core funded]

 

Paterson, J.R., Garcia-Bellido, D.C., Lee, M.S.Y., Brock, G.A., Jago, J.B. & EDGECOMBE, G.D. 2011. Acute vision in the giant Cambrian predator Anomalocaris and the origin of compound eyes. Nature, 480(7376): 237-240.  [Core funded]

 

TAYLOR, P.D. & Zagorsek, K. 2011. Operculate cyclostome bryozoans (Eleidae) from the Bohemian Cretaceous. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, 85(4): 407-432.  [Core funded]

 

Waisfeld, B.G., Vaccari, N.E., EDGECOMBE, G.D. & Chatterton, B.D.E. 2011. The upper ordovician trinucleid trilobite bancroftolithus from the Precordillera of Argentina. Journal of Paleontology, 85(6): 1160-1180.  [Core funded]

 

ZOOLOGY

 

Bohlen, J., Slechtova, V., Tan, H.H. & BRITZ, R. 2011. Phylogeny of the Southeast Asian freshwater fish genus Pangio (Cypriniformes, Cobitidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 61(3): 854-865.  [Core funded]

 

Breure, A.S.H. & ABLETT, J.D. 2011. Annotated type catalogue of the Amphibulimidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London. Zookeys(138): 1-52.  [Core funded]

 

Fan, X.P., Lin, X.F., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S., Al-Farraj, S.A., WARREN, A. & Song, W.B. 2011. The Diversity of Scuticociliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora): a Report on Eight Marine Forms Found in Coastal Waters of China, with a Description of One New Species. Acta Protozoologica, 50(3): 219-234.  [Core funded]

 

HAYES, P.M., Wertheim, D.F., Smit, N.J., Seddon, A.M. & Davies, A.J. 2011. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host. Parasites & Vectors, 4.  [Core funded?]

 

HIGGS, N.D., GLOVER, A.G., Dahlgren, T.G. & Little, C.T.S. 2011. Bone-Boring Worms: Characterizing the Morphology, Rate, and Method of Bioerosion by Osedax mucofloris (Annelida, Siboglinidae). Biological Bulletin, 221(3): 307-316.  [PhD student, Core funded]

 

MORTON, B. & Dinesen, G.E. 2011. The biology and functional morphology of Modiolarca subpicta (Bivalvia: Mytilidae: Musculinae), epizoically symbiotic with Ascidiella aspersa (Urochordata: Ascidiacea), from the Kattegat, northern Jutland, Denmark. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 91(8): 1637-1649.  [Scientific Associate]

 

MORTON, B., Peharda, M. & Petric, M. 2011. Functional morphology of Rocellaria dubia (Bivalvia: Gastrochaenidae) with new interpretations of crypt formation and adventitious tube construction, and a discussion of evolution within the family. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 104(4): 786-804.  [Scientific Associate]

 

Qin, Y.H., Qiu, Z.J., Shao, C., WARREN, A. & Shen, Z. 2011. Morphological Redescription and Morphogenesis of Urosoma macrostyla (Wrzesniowski, 1866) Berger, 1999 (Ciliophora, Hypotrichida). Acta Protozoologica, 50(3): 163-174.  [Core funded]

 

RIDDIFORD, N. & OLSON, P.D. 2011. Wnt gene loss in flatworms. Development Genes and Evolution, 221(4): 187-197.  [Unknown & Core funded]

 

Rijsdijk, K.F., Zinke, J., de Louw, P.G.B., HUME, J.P., van der Plicht, H., Hooghiemstra, H., Meijer, H.J.M., Vonhof, H.B., Porch, N., Florens, F.B.V., Baider, C., van Geel, B., Brinkkemper, J., Vernimmen, T. & Janoo, A. 2011. Mid-Holocene (4200 kyr BP) mass mortalities in Mauritius (Mascarenes): Insular vertebrates resilient to climatic extremes but vulnerable to human impact. Holocene, 21(8): 1179-1194.  [Externally funded?]

 

Ronowicz, M., Wiodarska-Kowalczuk, M. & KUKLINSKI, P. 2011. Patterns of hydroid (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) species richness and distribution in an Arctic glaciated fjord. Polar Biology, 34(10): 1437-1445.  [Scientific Associate]

 

Xu, Y., Esaulov, A., Lin, X.F., Mazei, Y., HU, X.Z., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S. & WARREN, A. 2011. Morphological Studies on Five Trachelocercids from the Yellow Sea Coast of China, with a Description of Tracheloraphis huangi spec. nov (Ciliophora, Karyorelictea). Acta Protozoologica, 50(3): 205-218.  [Externally funded, Core funded]

 

Xu, Y., Li, J.M., Gao, F., HU, X.Z. & Al-Rasheid, K.A.S. 2011. Apotrachelocerca arenicola (Kahl, 1933) n. g., comb. n. (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Trachelocercidae): Morphology and Phylogeny. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, 58(6): 504-510.  [Externally funded]

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Botany Department Seminar

 

Capturing the aliens

Jane Pottas and Juliet Brody

Department of Botany, NHM

 

18 January 2012

Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, NHM.

11:30-12:30

 

Using herbarium specimens to track the arrival and spread of non-native seaweeds.


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For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Taking a bite out of jawed vertebrate origins

 

Dr. Matt Friedman,

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford

 

Thursday 19th January
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, NHM

16:00-17:00

 

 

Jawed vertebrates, collectively called gnathostomes, include over 99 percent of all living species of animals with backbones. How did gnathostomes come to be, and how can we account for their astonishing evolutionary success, particularly in comparison to their jawless cousins, the agnathans? Over the past two decades, a series of fossil discoveries and novel analytical approaches have revealed important clues bearing on the evolutionary assembly of modern jawed vertebrates, but outstanding questions remain. Particularly significant is the origin of the skull architecture common to all jawed vertebrates, which differs substantially from that of any agnathan. Old fossils are beginning to yield some of their long-hidden secrets, helping to bridge some of the major gaps in our understanding of early gnathostome evolution. More insights come from the study of living fishes, which has revealed new ways of quantifying the functional and ecological significance of contrasting morphologies.

Applying these methods to ancient gnathostomes provides a fresh perspective on their initial evolutionary radiation, with important implications for understanding the shift from a world dominated by jawless fishes to one dominated by jawed vertebrates.

 

  

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Collection Management Seminar


Can we keep this?  Access & Benefit-Sharing: permits, problems and processes in managing collections and research.

 

Dr Chris Lyal

Department of Entomology

NHM

Thursday 26th January 2012

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

2.30pm-4.00pm

 

 

Synopsis:
In October last year the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) agreed the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-Sharing (ABS), formalising policy agreements that have been in place for nearly two decades.   The Protocol potentially affects the work of all scientific staff in the Museum, since it provides a framework for requirements in collecting and research permits, including what we can and cannot do with specimens, who we can lend them to, and what we might have to provide to the country where the specimens come from. The Museum, together with other collection-holding institutions, is developing a response that aims to protect our work and our staff, while ensuring that we can meet obligations agreed to in permits and other agreements.  Chris has been involved in negotiation on ABS and will discuss the policy, its implications for us and how the Museum might change its policies and processes.  This is an opportunity to explore how the Protocol might affect how we manage biological collections across the Museum, and suggesting how we might respond.

 

There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.

 


Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.

 

Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk)

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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