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171 Posts authored by: C Lowry
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Palaeontology Seminar

 

The mammal collections from Tabun cave Israel at Natural History Museum

 

Miss Spyridoula Pappa, Postgraduate research student, Royal Holloway University of London.

Thursday 21st June
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, 16:00

 

 

It is 74 years since D. Garrod & D. Bate’s publication ‘The stone of Mount Carmel’, where they first described the fossil fauna from Tabun Cave. Tabun is one of the most important caves from Mount Carmel (Israel) with the longest and most complete archaeological sequence in South-western Asia. One of the lowest layers from this sequence, Tabun E (TE), has been dated ca. 208 Ka. These layers, which were excavated by Dorothy Garrod between 1929 and 1934, revealed lower & middle Palaeolithic artefacts, hominid remains, including one almost complete Neanderthal burial, and several fossil mammal remains.

 

A one year project (April 2011 to March 2012) re-boxing and digitisation the specimens from Tabun Cave housed at Natural History Museum revealed that there were 7096 mammal specimens and this enabled the collection to be thoroughly reviewed and systematic work carried out. Although storage space was limited, space issues were overcome by careful organisation of the specimens within acid free boxes according to size range (Fig.1). Small and fragile specimens were nested into Plastazote for additional protection. This project not only resulted in a more accessible collection but also demonstrated that this important collection represents 29 different mammal (herbivores & carnivores) and 33 micromammal species including 15 Holotypes.

 

This historical collection is also significant with regards to other potential scientific projects. I will present some examples of different methods that we applied including Dama’s (prefers moist environment) and Gazella’s (prefers dry environment) teeth analyses (LEO SEM, chemical condition and 3D reconstruction) and discuss some of the results (Fig. 2, 3). This novel work will hopefully shed light on the dietary habits, morphological teeth features and the impact of climatic changes on the fauna.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Collections Management Seminar


EU-COM: Development of an On-line Forum and Collections Management tool for and by European collections management staff.

 

Garin Cael, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium

 

Monday 25th June 2012,

2.30pm-4.00pm

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

 

 

After the SPNHC (Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections) conference in Leiden 2009 and a follow-up questionnaire, a strong need was revealed for an overarching network or forum for European natural history collection managers.
During a brainstorming meeting at the NHM, London in August 2010, it was decided that this new forum, called EU-COM, would be developed with the support of the EU projects EDIT (European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy) and SYNTHESYS (Synthesis of Systematic Resources). A draft plan and mock-up for the website were created and development started towards the end of 2010. 
The idea is to have a working Forum with a substantial amount of initial collections management content before being launched towards the end of 2012. It will serve as the primary resource for Natural History Collections in Europe, in multiple languages and will be driven by the community.
The Forum is hosted as a sub-domain to the Cybertaxonomy portal of the Royal Museum for Central Africa, but remains independent. The development and initial testing has been conducted and the portal is now ready to move into beta testing. The biggest challenge is to get initial contributions onto the site to create a solid base of content before the launch, so that users will actually recognize the usefulness of the portal and come back later if they have a different question.
Garin will demonstrate the Forum and be seeking ideas for content, content contributors and offers from people to act as testers.

 

 

The seminar is open to all members of the museum who are interested in getting involved or learning more about recovery of the collections in a disaster situation. We also welcome colleagues from other institutions who would find the seminar of interest. There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.

 

Science Group: All senior departmental managers & collection management staff.

Public Engagement Group:  Any staff who work with and use collections or manage staff who work with collections.


Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.


Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk)

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Seminar 

Thursday 7th June
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, 16:00

 

 

 

 

Form and function in Cambrian stem-group echinoderms

 

 

 

Dr Imran Rahman, School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham

 

 

 

 

 

Modern echinoderms such as sea urchins and starfish are characterized by a unique pentaradiate body plan, which is established during ontogeny and clearly distinguishes them from other bilaterians. By contrast, some of the earliest fossil representatives of the phylum do not display radial symmetry; most strikingly, two Cambrian groups, ctenocystoids and cinctans, lack almost all the derived characters shared by extant species. These taxa are best interpreted as basal stem-group echinoderms, and hence may provide important insights into the origin and early evolution of echinoderms. However, their fossils are often difficult to interpret because so little of their anatomy has been deciphered, with competing phylogenetic hypotheses derived from differing interpretations of enigmatic characters. In order to better understand the evolutionary significance of these aberrant echinoderms, complete, three-dimensionally preserved ctenocystoid and cinctan fossils were studied using novel imaging (X-ray micro-tomography) and computer modelling (computational fluid dynamics) techniques. The results allow us to reconstruct form and function in the echinoderm stem-group, with implications for the assembly of the echinoderm body plan.

 

 





 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Zoology Seminar

 

Aplacophoran molluscs—Diversity, Relationships and Hidden Beauty

 

Christiane TODT,
University Museum of Bergen, Norway

 

THURSDAY 7th June, 13.30pm

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

 

When residing last summer among the islands and fjords of the western coast of Sweden, I met with an animal the mere external appearance of which immediately attracted my particular attention.
With these words a new species of worm-like marine invertebrate, Neomenia carinata, was introduced to science - communicated by Tycho Tullberg in 1875, finally published in 1886. He could observe a specimen alive and obviously was fascinated by this unknown “worm” covered in calcareous sclerites and creeping on a ciliated ventral gliding sole. Since then, 268 additional species of Solenogastres have been described, and about 130 species of the closely related Caudofoveata. Most of our knowledge on the diversity of the so-called aplacophoran molluscs is based on museum material, predominantly from deep-sea cruises. A wealth of unknown diversity is still resting in museum collections, awaiting attention of one of the very few taxonomic experts. I met my first living solenogaster in 1999 during a field trip to Bermuda. In contrast to Tullberg I knew what I was seeing – educated by my previous thesis work focusing on more or less well-fixed African solenogaster material. Still, I was as fascinated with the strange beauty of these animals. Since 2006, I work in Bergen, Norway, with excellent collecting and culturing facilities and a rich aplacophoran fauna in the fjords just outside the city. In addition, I have access to a large material from Norwegian waters, from recent collection efforts and dating back to the early days of aplacophoran taxonomy. In my seminar talk I will summarize the status quo of knowledge on aplacophoran biodiversity and phylogenetic relationships and outline the planned work for my SYNTHESYS stay at the Natural History Museum (21.5 - 8.6.2012). This work will include testing the suitability of micro-computer-tomography for non-invasive identification of solenogaster museum material.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Recent Publications - May

Posted by C Lowry May 22, 2012

Publications for the previous 4 -5 weeks (Search done 17th May)

(Search on the basis of ‘Nat SAME Hist SAME Mus* SAME Lon* in Web of Science + NHM TRING publications)

EARTH SCIENCES

MINERALOGY

Burchell, M.J., Cole, M.J., Price, M.C. & KEARSLEY, A.T. 2012. Experimental investigation of impacts by solar cell secondary ejecta on silica aerogel and aluminum foil: Implications for the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 47(4): 671-683.    

Cockell, C.S., Voytek, M.A., Gronstal, A.L., Finster, K., Kirshtein, J.D., HOWARD, K., Reitner, J., Gohn, G.S., Sanford, W.E., Horton, J.W., Kallmeyer, J., Kelly, L. & Powars, D.S. 2012. Impact Disruption and Recovery of the Deep Subsurface Biosphere. Astrobiology, 12(3): 231-246.

Ferrat, M., WEISS, D.J. & STREKOPYTOV, S. 2012. A single procedure for the accurate and precise quantification of the rare earth elements, Sc, Y, Th and Pb in dust and peat for provenance tracing in climate and environmental studies. Talanta, 93: 415-423.   

JOHANSON, Z., KEARSLEY, A., den Blaauwen, J., Newman, M. & Smith, M.M. 2012. Ontogenetic development of an exceptionally preserved Devonian cartilaginous skeleton. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, 318 B(1): 50-58.   

KEARSLEY, A.T., Burchell, M.J., Price, M.C., Cole, M.J., Wozniakiewicz, P.J., Ishii, H.A., Bradley, J.P., Fries, M. & Foster, N.J. 2012. Experimental impact features in Stardust aerogel: How track morphology reflects particle structure, composition, and density. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47(4): 737-762.    

Larner, F. & REHKAMPER, M. 2012. Evaluation of Stable Isotope Tracing for ZnO Nanomaterials-New Constraints from High Precision Isotope Analyses and Modeling. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(7): 4149-4158.    

Nixon, A., Burchell, M.J., Price, M.C., KEARSLEY, A.T. & Jones, S. 2012. Aerogel tracks made by impacts of glycine: Implications for formation of bulbous tracks in aerogel and the Stardust mission. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 47(4): 623-633.    

Ogliore, R.C., Floss, C., Stadermann, F.J., KEARSLEY, A.T., Leitner, J., Stroud, R.M. & Westphal, A.J. 2012. Automated searching of Stardust interstellar foils. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47(4): 729-736.    

Price, M.C., KEARSLEY, A.T., Burchell, M.J., HOWARD, L.E., Hillier, J.K., Starkey, N.A., Wozniakiewicz, P.J. & Cole, M.J. 2012. Stardust interstellar dust calibration: Hydrocode modeling of impacts on Al-1100 foil at velocities up to 300kms-1 and validation with experimental data. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 47(4): 684-695.    

Reissis, D. & ABEL, R.L. 2012. Development of fetal trabecular micro-architecture in the humerus and femur. Journal of Anatomy, 220(5): 496-503.    

Robinson, K.L., Treiman, A.H. & JOY, K.H. 2012. Basaltic fragments in lunar feldspathic meteorites: Connecting sample analyses to orbital remote sensing. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 47(3): 387-399.    

THORNE, R.L., Roberts, S. & HERRINGTON, R.J. 2012. Climate change and the formation of nickel laterite deposits. Geology, 40(4): 331-334.    

VITA-FINZI, C. 2012. River history. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A - Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences, 370(1966): 2029-2039.    

VITA-FINZI, C. 2012. River history and tectonics. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A - Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences, 370(1966): 2173-2192

WOOLLEY, A.R. & Bailey, D.K. 2012. The crucial role of lithospheric structure in the generation and release of carbonatites: geological evidence. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(2): 259-270.    

Wozniakiewicz, P.J., Ishii, H.A., KEARSLEY, A.T., Burchell, M.J., Bradley, J.P., Price, M.C., Teslich, N., Lee, M.R. & Cole, M.J. 2012. Stardust impact analogs: Resolving pre- and postimpact mineralogy in Stardust Al foils. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47(4): 708-728.    

Wozniakiewicz, P.J., KEARSLEY, A.T., Ishii, H.A., Burchell, M.J., Bradley, J.P., Teslich, N., Cole, M.J. & Price, M.C. 2012. The origin of crystalline residues in Stardust Al foils: Surviving cometary dust or crystallized impact melts? Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47(4): 660-670.    

Xu, Y., Zhang, Y.L., Li, J., Gioia, R., Zhang, G., Li, X.D., SPIRO, B., Bhatia, R.S. & Jones, K.C. 2012. The spatial distribution and potential sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) over the Asian marginal seas and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 117.    

Zema, M., WELCH, M.D. & Oberti, R. 2012. High-T behaviour of gedrite: thermoelasticity, cation ordering and dehydrogenation. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 163(5): 923-937.    

PALAEONTOLOGY

Bennett, C.E., Siveter, D.J., Davies, S.J., Williams, M., Wilkinson, I.P., Browne, M. & MILLER, C.G. 2011. Ostracods from freshwater and brackish environments of the Carboniferous of the Midland Valley of Scotland: the early colonization of terrestrial water bodies. Geological Magazine, 149(3): 366-396. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0016756811000719    

Coppard, S.E., Kroh, A. & SMITH, A.B. 2011. The evolution of pedicellariae in echinoids: an arms race against pests and parasites. Acta Zoologica, 93(2): 125-148. DOI: 10.1111/j.1463-6395.2010.00487.x.    

Gomez, B., EWIN, T.A.M. & Daviero-Gomez, V. 2012. The conifer Glenrosa falcata sp nov from the Lower Cretaceous of Spain and its palaeoecology. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 172: 21-32.

JOHANSON, Z., KEARSLEY, A., den Blaauwen, J., Newman, M. & Smith, M.M. 2012. Ontogenetic development of an exceptionally preserved Devonian cartilaginous skeleton. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, 318 B(1): 50-58.    

Koch, M. & EDGECOMBE, G.D. 2012. The preoral chamber in geophilomorph centipedes: comparative morphology, phylogeny, and the evolution of centipede feeding structures. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 165(1): 1-62.    

PARR, W.C.H., Chatterjee, H.J. & Soligo, C. 2012. Calculating the axes of rotation for the subtalar and talocrural joints using 3D bone reconstructions. Journal of Biomechanics, 45(6): 1103-1107.    

SMITH, A.B. & Crame, J.A. 2012. Echinoderm faunas from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) of Alexander Island, Antarctica. Palaeontology, 55: 305-324.    

Smith, T.M., Olejniczak, A.J., Zermeno, J.P., Tafforeau, P., Skinner, M.M., Hoffmann, A., Radovčić, J., Toussaint, M., KRUSZYNSKI, R., Menter, M., Moggi-Cecchi, J., Glasmacher, U.A., Kullmer, O., Schrenk, F., STRINGER, C. & Hublin, J.J. 2012. Variation in enamel thickness within the genus Homo. Journal of Human Evolution, 62(3): 395-411.    

SOOKIAS, R.B., Butler, R.J. & Benson, R.B.J. 2012. Rise of dinosaurs reveals major body-size transitions are driven by passive processes of trait evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, 279(1736): 2180-2187.    

STRINGER, C. 2012. What makes a modern human. Nature, 485(7396): 33-35.

LIFE SCIENCES

BOTANY

Bebber, D.P., CARINE, M.A., Davidse, G., Harris, D.J., Haston, E.M., PENN, M.G., CAFFERTY, S., Wood, J.R.I. & Scotland, R.W. 2012. Big hitting collectors make massive and disproportionate contribution to the discovery of plant species. Proceedings of the Royal Society B - Biological Sciences, 279(1736): 2269-2274.

Jayalal, U., WOLSELEY, P., GUEIDAN, C., Aptroot, A., Wijesundara, S. & Karunaratne, V. 2012. Anzia mahaeliyensis and Anzia flavotenuis, two new lichen species from Sri Lanka. The Lichenologist, 44(3): 381-389.    

Karl, R., Kiefer, C., ANSELL, S.W. & Koch, M.A. 2012. Systematics and evolution of arctic-alpine Arabis alpina (Brassicaceae) and its closest relatives in the eastern Mediterranean. American Journal of Botany, 99(4): 778-794.    

SÄRKINEN, T., Pennington, R.T., Lavin, M., Simon, M.F. & Hughes, C.E. 2012. Evolutionary islands in the Andes: Persistence and isolation explain high endemism in Andean dry tropical forests. Journal of Biogeography, 39(5): 884-900. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02644.x     

Wetzel, C.E., Van de Vijver, B., COX, E.J., Bicudo D de C. & Ector, L. 2012. Tursiocola podocnemicola sp. nov., a new epizoic freshwater diatom species from the Amazon basin (Rio Negro, Brazil). Diatom Research, 27(1): 1-8. DOI:10.1080/0269249X.2011.642498.    

ENTOMOLOGY

Barthélémy, C. & BROAD, G.R. 2012. A new species of Hadrocryptus (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae), with the first account of the biology for the genus. Journal of Hymenoptera Research, 24: 47-57.    

Bazsalovicsová, E., Králová-Hromadová, I., ŠTEKKA, J. & Scholz, T. 2011. Molecular characterization of Atractolytocestus sagittatus (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), monozoic parasite of common carp, and its differentiation from the invasive species Atractolytocestus huronensis. Parasitology Research, 110(5): 1621-1629.    

Bone, J., Archer, M., Barraclough, D., EGGLETON, P., Flight, D., Head, M., JONES, D.T., Scheib, C. & Voulvoulis, N. 2012. Public Participation in Soil Surveys: Lessons from a Pilot Study in England. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(7): 3687-3696.    

BROOKS, S.J., Jones, V.J., Telford, R.J., Appleby, P.G., Watson, E., McGowan, S. & Benn, S. 2012. Population trends in the Slavonian grebe Podiceps auritus (L.) and Chironomidae (Diptera) at a Scottish loch. Journal of Paleolimnology, 47(4): 631-644.    

Davies, A.B., EGGLETON, P., van Rensburg, B.J. & Parr, C.L. 2012. The pyrodiversity-biodiversity hypothesis: a test with savanna termite assemblages. Journal of Applied Ecology, 49(2): 422-430.    

Frutos, P., Hoste, H., Sotiraki, S., HALL, M. & Jackson, F. 2012. Specificities of parasitism in goats and sheep: Interactions with nutrition and control strategies. Small Ruminant Research, 103(1): 1-2.    

HANSSON, C. 2012. Achrysocharoides Girault (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) new to tropical America, with eight new species. Zookeys(173): 79-108.    

Hernandez-Lopez, A., Rougerie, R., Augustin, S., LEES, D.C., Tomov, R., Kenis, M., Cota, E., Kullaj, E., HANSSON, C., Grabenweger, G., Roques, A. & Lopez-Vaamonde, C. 2012. Host tracking or cryptic adaptation? Phylogeography of Pediobius saulius (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), a parasitoid of the highly invasive horse-chestnut leafminer. Evolutionary Applications, 5(3): 256-269.    

Larsen, T.B. & VANE-WRIGHT, R.I. 2012. The name Bicyclus safitza (Westwood, 1850) should continue to be used (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae). Shilap-Revista De Lepidopterologia, 40(157): 85-86.    

MAHAMDALLIE, S.S. & READY, P.D. 2012. No recent adaptive selection on the apyrase of Mediterranean Phlebotomus: implications for using salivary peptides to vaccinate against canine leishmaniasis. Evolutionary Applications, 5(3): 293-305. DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-4571.2011.00226.x.    

PONT, A.C. 2012. Muscoidea (Fanniidae, Anthomyiidae, Muscidae) described by P. J. M. Macquart (Insecta, Diptera). Zoosystema, 34(1): 39-111.    

QUICKE, D.L.J. 2012. We Know Too Little about Parasitoid Wasp Distributions to Draw Any Conclusions about Latitudinal Trends in Species Richness, Body Size and Biology. PLoS ONE, 7(2).    

Rodriguez-Roche, R., Villegas, E., COOK, S., Poh Kim, P.A.W., Hinojosa, Y., Rosario, D., Villalobos, I., Bendezu, H., Hibberd, M.L. & Guzman, M.G. 2012. Population structure of the dengue viruses, Aragua, Venezuela, 2006-2007. Insights into dengue evolution under hyperendemic transmission. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 12(2): 332-344.    

Samartin, S., Heiri, O., Vescovi, E., BROOKS, S.J. & Tinner, W. 2012. Late glacial and early Holocene summer temperatures in the southern Swiss Alps reconstructed using fossil chironomids. Journal of Quaternary Science, 27(3): 279-289.    

Sotiraki, S. & HALL, M.J.R. 2012. A review of comparative aspects of myiasis in goats and sheep in Europe. Small Ruminant Research, 103(1): 75-83.    

TIMMERMANS, M. & VOGLER, A.P. 2012. Phylogenetically informative rearrangements in mitochondrial genomes of Coleoptera, and monophyly of aquatic elateriform beetles (Dryopoidea). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 63(2): 299-304.    

WILLIAMS, P.H., An, J.D., Brown, M.J.F., Carolan, J.C., Goulson, D., Huang, J.X. & Ito, M. 2012. Cryptic Bumblebee Species: Consequences for Conservation and the Trade in Greenhouse Pollinators. PLoS ONE, 7(3).    

ZOOLOGY

Brabec, J., Scholz, T., Kralova-Hromadova, I., Bazsalovicsova, E. & OLSON, P.D. 2012. Substitution saturation and nuclear paralogs of commonly employed phylogenetic markers in the Caryophyllidea, an unusual group of non-segmented tapeworms (Platyhelminthes). International Journal for Parasitology, 42(3): 259-267.    

BRITZ, R. & Johnson, G.D. 2012. The caudal skeleton of a 20 mm Triodon and homology of its components. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 125(1): 66-73.

Budha, P.B., MORDAN, P.B., NAGGS, F. & Backeljau, T. 2012. Darwininitium - a new fully pseudosigmurethrous orthurethran genus from Nepal (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Cerastidae). Zookeys(175): 19-26.    

CAMERON, R.A.D. & Cook, L.M. 2012. Habitat and the shell polymorphism of Cepaea nemoralis (L.): interrogating the Evolution Megalab database. Journal of Molluscan Studies, 78: 179-184.    

Chen, H.C., Kuo, R.J., Chang, T.C., Hus, C.K., BRAY, R.A. & Cheng, I.J. 2012. Fluke (Spirorchiidae) Infections in Sea Turtles Stranded on Taiwan: Prevalence and Pathology. Journal of Parasitology, 98(2): 437-439.    

Chen, X.R., Gao, S., Liu, W.W., Song, W.B., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S. & WARREN, A. 2012. Taxonomic descriptions of three marine colepid ciliates, Nolandia sinica spec. nov., Apocoleps caoi spec. nov and Tiarina fusa (Claparede & Lachmann, 1858) Bergh, 1881 (Ciliophora, Prorodontida). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 62: 735-744.    

Dmitrieva, E.V., Gerasev, P.I., GIBSON, D.I., Pronkina, N.V. & Galli, P. 2012. Descriptions of eight new species of Ligophorus Euzet & Suriano, 1977 (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) from Red Sea mullets. Systematic Parasitology, 81(3): 203-237.    

Marzoug, D., Boutiba, Z., GIBSON, D.I., Pérez-del-Olmo, A. & Kostadinova, A. 2012. Descriptions of digeneans from Sardina pilchardus (Walbaum) (Clupeidae) off the Algerian coast of the western Mediterranean, with a complete list of its helminth parasites. Systematic Parasitology, 81(3): 169-186.    

Mouahid, G., Faliex, E., Allienne, J.F., Cribb, T.H. & BRAY, R.A. 2012. Proctophantastes nettastomatis (Digenea: Zoogonidae) from Vanuatu deep-sea fish: new morphological features, allometric growth, and phenotypic plasticity aspects. Parasitology Research, 110(5): 1631-1638.    

OKAMURA, B., Humphries, S. & GRUHL, A. 2012. Buddenbrockia plumatellae: a novel solution to being a worm. Abstract. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 52: E131-E131.    

SHERRATT, E., WILKINSON, M., GOWER, D.J. & Klingenberg, C.P. 2012. Evolution of Cranial Modularity in Caecilians. Abstract. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 52: E159-E159.    

Toksen, E., BOXSHALL, G.A. & Altinozek, S. 2012. Sagum posteli Delamare-Deboutteville & Nunes-Ruivo, 1954 (Copepoda: Siphonostomatoida: Lernanthropidae) parasitic on Epinephelus aeneus (Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire) in Turkish waters, with a key to the species of Sagum Wilson, 1913. Systematic Parasitology, 82(1): 71-80.    

WARREN, B.H., Bermingham, E., Bourgeois, Y., Estep, L.K., PRYS-JONES, R.P., Strasberg, D. & Thebaud, C. 2012. Hybridization and barriers to gene flow in an island bird radiation. Evolution, 66(5): 1490-1505.    

WEBSTER, B.L. & LITTLEWOOD, D.T.J. 2012. Mitochondrial gene order change in Schistosoma (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Schistosomatidae). International Journal for Parasitology, 42(3): 313-321.    

PEG

Sutherland, W.J., Bellingan, L., Bellingham, J.R., Blackstock, J.J., BLOOMFIELD, R.M., Bravo, M., Cadman, V.M., Cleevely, D.D., Clements, A., Cohen, A.S., Cope, D.R., Daemmrich, A.A., Devecchi, C., Anadon, L.D., Denegri, S., Doubleday, R., Dusic, N.R., Evans, R.J., Feng, W.Y., Godfray, H.C.J., Harris, P., Hartley, S.E., Hester, A.J., Holmes, J., Hughes, A., Hulme, M., Irwin, C., Jennings, R.C., Kass, G.S., Littlejohns, P., Marteau, T.M., McKee, G., Millstone, E.P., Nuttall, W.J., Owens, S., Parker, M.M., Pearson, S., Petts, J., Ploszek, R., Pullin, A.S., Reid, G., Richards, K.S., Robinson, J.G., Shaxson, L., Sierra, L., Smith, B.G., Spiegelhalter, D.J., Stilgoe, J., Stirling, A., Tyler, C.P., Winickoff, D.E. & Zimmern, R.L. 2012. A Collaboratively-Derived Science-Policy Research Agenda. PLoS ONE, 7(3).    

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Collection Management Seminar


CoRR - Developing Disaster Recovery: Front to Back - A museum wide project 

 

Chris Collins and Clare Valentine, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, South Kensington, London, SW7 5BD.

 

Wednesday 23rd May 2012,

2.30pm-4.00pm

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

 

 

Do you know what would happen if there was a major emergency affecting the collections in the museum? How would you react and what would you do? Over the last 4 years Collections Management Staff in Science and members of Design and Conservation have been developing a disaster plan – the CoRR Plan – that coordinates the museums response in an emergency situation when collections are at risk. The CoRR team has already held a number of training exercises across the museum and teams from CoRR have already been involved in real-life responses to a number of smaller building based problems.

 

A major cross museum emergency that causes serious museum wide damage to the collections will require response from all areas of the museum. The Group is focusing on training and developing a coordinated group of individuals who can undertake collection recovery using techniques appropriate to the natural history museums collections.  The CoRR project involves everybody in the museum in some way, from Science to House-Keeping to Estates. 

 

The talk will look at the work we have already done, the current CoRR plan, training initiatives and exercises that are planned, the teams involved in recovery and importantly how you can get involved .

Who should come?

 

 

The seminar is open to all members of the museum who are interested in getting involved or learning more about recovery of the collections in a disaster situation. We also welcome colleagues from other institutions who would find the seminar of interest. There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.

 

Science Group: All senior departmental managers & collection management staff.

Public Engagement Group:  Any staff who work with and use collections or manage staff who work with collections.

 

Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.


Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Seminar

 

Tracking nautiloid migrational seaways: using pelagic faunas as a complementary tool for palaeogeographic reconstruction

 

Dr. Kathleen Histon, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia

 

Thursday 24th May
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, 16:00

 

  

Documentation of the distribution and biodiversity of environmentally sensitive groups is an important element in palaeogeographical reconstruction. Establishment of the precise position, width and timing of open seaways is a pivotal factor in unravelling complex regional geodynamic histories. As nautiloid cephalopods are particularly sensitive to distance and water depth separating landmasses and to fluctuations in sea level they can be considered reliable tools for tracing migrational pathways of pelagic faunas during certain intervals. This complementary dataset can be utilized to confirm models regarding palaeocontinent/microterrane position based on the traditional use of distribution of benthonic faunas.

 

Detailed field studies on the cephalopod limestone biofacies from the almost complete biostratigraphically well constrained Silurian successions in the Carnic Alps (Austria) over the past decade have provided significant data regarding the relationship between sea-level change and faunal events for this middle palaeolatitude North Gondwanan microterrane during the Silurian. The response of various faunal groups to the eustatic changes identified on a local scale has been  compared and related to similar studies in progress from other North Gondwana terranes such as Sardinia and Bohemia and on a global scale with some sectors of Avalonia (the British Isles) and Laurentia (North America). The findings may also have critical relevance within the context of identification of nautiloid cephalopod bioevents and their relation to the dynamics of the global carbon cycle. Detailed studies in this respect for major groups such as nautiloids are lacking to date for the Silurian.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Zoology Seminar


Aplacophoran molluscs—Diversity, Relationships and Hidden Beauty

 

Christiane TODT
University Museum of Bergen, Norway

 

TUESDAY 22nd May, 12pm

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

 


When residing last summer among the islands and fjords of the western coast of Sweden, I met with an animal the mere external appearance of which immediately attracted my particular attention.
With these words a new species of worm-like marine invertebrate, Neomenia carinata, was introduced to science - communicated by Tycho Tullberg in 1875, finally published in 1886. He could observe a specimen alive and obviously was fascinated by this unknown “worm” covered in calcareous sclerites and creeping on a ciliated ventral gliding sole. Since then, 268 additional species of Solenogastres have been described, and about 130 species of the closely related Caudofoveata. Most of our knowledge on the diversity of the so-called aplacophoran molluscs is based on museum material, predominantly from deep-sea cruises. A wealth of unknown diversity is still resting in museum collections, awaiting attention of one of the very few taxonomic experts. I met my first living solenogaster in 1999 during a field trip to Bermuda. In contrast to Tullberg I knew what I was seeing – educated by my previous thesis work focusing on more or less well-fixed African solenogaster material. Still, I was as fascinated with the strange beauty of these animals. Since 2006, I work in Bergen, Norway, with excellent collecting and culturing facilities and a rich aplacophoran fauna in the fjords just outside the city. In addition, I have access to a large material from Norwegian waters, from recent collection efforts and dating back to the early days of aplacophoran taxonomy. In my seminar talk I will summarize the status quo of knowledge on aplacophoran biodiversity and phylogenetic relationships and outline the planned work for my SYNTHESYS stay at the Natural History Museum (21.5 - 8.6.2012). This work will include testing the suitability of micro-computer-tomography for non-invasive identification of solenogaster museum material.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Seminar

 

Trilobitomorph trunk segmentation: a tale of trilobites, myriapods and their genes

 

Javier Ortega-Hernández,

Department of Earth Sciences,

University of Cambridge

 

Thursday 10th May, 16:00
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2,

 

+

Trilobites are some of the most common and abundant metazoans preserved in the fossil record, but little is known about the intrinsic mechanisms that orchestrate their body organization. The phylogenetic position of trilobites within total-group Euarthropoda, however, allows making inferences about the processes of segment formation in these extinct taxa, as some of the fundamental genetic processes for constructing the body segments are remarkably conserved among extant arthropods. In this talk I will tackle the problem of trilobite trunk segmentation by drawing comparisons with conserved mechanisms for tergite formation, and its associated gene expression, in extant representatives. The results obtained from studying the tergite development in the centipede Strigamia maritima revives old trilobite segmentation models, and suggest that these extinct arthropods had a considerable, and largely unsuspected, degree of developmental complexity.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Zoology Seminars


Evolutionary Aspects of Reproductive Biology and Morphology of Caecilian Amphibians (Gymnophiona)

 

Susanne Kühnel
Institut für Spezielle Zoologie und Evolutionsbiologie, Universität Jena

 

TUESDAY 15th May, 12pm

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

 

 

Among extant vertebrates, caecilians are still considered one of the least-explored groups. This small clade of modern limbless amphibians has striking anatomical novelties and exhibits variable life histories including diverse modes of parity and parental care. All caecilian amphibians practice internal fertilization with the aid of a unique copulatory organ: the everted male cloaca. Since the caecilian cloaca is ontogenetically a part of the digestive system it is not a separate structure exclusively dedicated for reproduction, like e.g. the squamate hemipenis. Nevertheless, the male cloaca reveals a complex morphology being equipped with longitudinal ridges, tuberosities or crests and displays a high diversity among species. Here I present my work on general and functional morphology aspects of the male and female caecilian cloaca based on specimens housed in natural history museum collections. The recent comparative evolutionary study includes species representing the major clades and reproductive modes. It aims to reveal the evolution of specific genital morphologies and if morphological patterns are linked to reproductive modes or other life history and morphological aspects in this fascinating group of tetrapods.

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

 

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Recent Publications- April

Posted by C Lowry Apr 24, 2012

Publications for last 4 Weeks (Search done on 19th April.)

 

(Search on the basis of ‘Nat SAME Hist SAME Mus* SAME Lon* in Web of Science + TRING)

 

EARTH SCIENCES

MINERALOGY

 

Faithfull, J.W., Timmerman, M.J., Upton, B.G.J. & RUMSEY, M.S. 2012. Mid-Eocene renewal of magmatism in NW Scotland: the Loch Roag Dyke, Outer Hebrides. Journal of the Geological Society, 169(2): 115-118.   

 

Ferrat, M., WEISS, D.J., Dong, S.F., Large, D.J., SPIRO, B., Sun, Y.B. & Gallagher, K. 2012. Lead atmospheric deposition rates and isotopic trends in Asian dust during the last 9.5 kyr recorded in an ombrotrophic peat bog on the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 82: 4-22.

 

Gibbard, P. & VITA-FINZI, C. 2012. Richard William Hey, 1917-2011 A tribute. Proceedings of the Geologists Association, 123(1): 228-229.   

 

Jouvin, D., WEISS, D.J., Mason, T.F.M., Bravin, M.N., Louvat, P., Zhao, F., Ferec, F., Hinsinger, P. & Benedetti, M.F. 2012. Stable Isotopes of Cu and Zn in Higher Plants: Evidence for Cu Reduction at the Root Surface and Two Conceptual Models for Isotopic Fractionation Processes. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(5): 2652-2660.   

 

Kojonen, K.K., McDonald, A.M., STANLEY, C.J. & Johanson, B. 2011. Tornroosite, Pd11As2Te2, a new mineral species related to Isomertieite from Miessijoki, Finnish Lapland, Finland. Canadian Mineralogist, 49(6): 1643-1651.   

 

PALAEONTOLOGY

ANQUETIN, J. 2012. Reassessment of the phylogenetic interrelationships of basal turtles (Testudinata). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 10(1): 3-45.   

 

Aston, J.A.D., Buck, D., Coleman, J., Cotter, C.J., Jones, N.S., Macaulay, V., MACLEOD, N., Moriarty, J.M., Nevins, A. & Functional Phylogenies, G. 2012. Phylogenetic inference for function-valued traits: speech sound evolution. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 27(3): 160-166.   

 

BAKER, E., JOHNSON, K.G. & Young, J.R. 2011. The future of the past in the present: biodiversity informatics and geological time. Zookeys(150): 397-405.     

 

BUCK, L.T., STRINGER, C.B., Maclarnon, A.M. & Rae, T.C. 2012. Paranasal sinus shape in Pleistocene hominins. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 147: 108-108.   

 

Gutierrez, B.L., MACLEOD, N. & EDGECOMBE, G.D. 2011. Detecting taxonomic signal in an under-utilised character system: geometric morphometrics of the forcipular coxae of Scutigeromorpha (Chilopoda). Zookeys(156): 49-66.   

 

HOOKER, J.J. & Russell, D.E. 2012. Early Palaeogene Louisinidae (Macroscelidea, Mammalia), their relationships and north European diversity. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 164(4): 856-936.   

 

MAIDMENT, S.C.R. & BARRETT, P.M. 2011. The locomotor musculature of basal ornithischian dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 31(6): 1265-1291.   

 

Paterson, J.R., Garcia-Bellido, D.C. & EDGECOMBE, G.D. 2012. New Artiopodan Arthropods from the Early Cambrian Emu Bay Shale Konservat-Lagerstatte of South Australia. Journal of Paleontology, 86(2): 340-357.   

 

Stewart, J.R. & STRINGER, C.B. 2012. Human Evolution Out of Africa: The Role of Refugia and Climate Change. Science, 335(6074): 1317-1321.   

 

TAYLOR, P.D. 2012. Untitled (Editorial). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 10(1): 1-1.   

 

LIFE SCIENCES

BOTANY

BRODIE, J. 2011. Developing a global seaweed network. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 173-174

 

BRODIE, J., Ramirez, M.E., Shaw, R., Wyatt, C., Mansilla, A. & Broom, J. 2011. Sorting out the locals: biodiversity of porphyra sensu lato (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) in Magellanes region, Chile. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 93-93.   

 

COX, E.J. 2011. Evolution and development in microalgae - have gene sequences led us down a blind alley? European Journal of Phycology, 46: 20-20.   

 

De Groot, G.A., During, H.J., ANSELL, S.W., SCHNEIDER, H., Bremer, P., Wubs, E.R.J., Maas, J.W., Korpelainen, H. & Erkens, R.H.J. 2012. Diverse spore rains and limited local exchange shape fern genetic diversity in a recently created habitat colonized by long-distance dispersal. Annals of Botany, 109(5): 965-978.   

 

Ebach, M.C. & WILLIAMS, D.M. 2011. A Devil's Glossary for Biological Systematics. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, 33(2): 249-257.   

 

ELLIS, L.T. 2012. Typification of Braithwaitea sulcata (Hook.) A.Jaeger & Sauerb. (Musci, Braithwaiteaceae). Journal of Bryology, 34: 61-63.   

 

ELLIS, L.T., Bednarek-Ochyra, H., Cykowska, B., Ochyra, R., Garcia, C., Sergio, C., Lebouvier, M., Manolaki, P., Giannouris, E., Kadis, C., Markova, I., Papp, B., Szurdoki, E., Peralta, D.F., Plasek, V., Ristow, R., Sabovljevic, M., Sim-Sim, M., Smith, V.R., Tsakiri, E., Vana, J., Virchenko, V.M. & Barsukov, O.O. 2012. New national and regional bryophyte records, 30. Journal of Bryology, 34: 45-51.   

 

ELLIS, L.T. & Price, M.J. 2012. Typification of Schistostega pennata (Hedw.) F.Weber & D.Mohr (Schistostegaceae). Journal of Bryology, 34: 17-21.   

 

Karthick, B. & WILLIAMS, D.M. 2012. The International Code for Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants - a significant rewrite of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. Current Science, 102(4): 551-552.   

 

Ligrone, R., DUCKETT, J.G. & Renzaglia, K.S. 2012. Major transitions in the evolution of early land plants: a bryological perspective. Annals of Botany, 109(5): 851-871.   

 

Sanchez, N., Verges, A., Peteiro, C., Polo, L. & BRODIE, J. 2011. A new cryptic species in the mediterranean sea: molecular and morphological insights into bladed species of the Bangiales. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 67-68

 

THUS, H., Muggia, L., Perez-Ortega, S., Favero-Longo, S.E., Joneson, S., O'Brien, H., Nelsen, M.P., DUQUE-THUS, R., Grube, M., Friedl, T., BRODIE, J., Andrew, C.J., Lucking, R., Lutzoni, F. & GUEIDAN, C. 2011. Revisiting photobiont diversity in the lichen family Verrucariaceae (Ascomycota). European Journal of Phycology, 46(4): 399-415.   

 

Verges, A., Sanchez, N., Peteiro, C., Huete-Stauffer, T., Polo, L. & BRODIE, J. 2011. Porphyra suborbiculata (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) in Northern Spain, an asiatic species new to European Atlantic. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 190-191

 

WILLIS, L. & COX, E.J. 2011. Developing nano-scale physical models to identify mechanisms of pore occlusion formation in diatoms. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 175-175.   

 

Witkowski, J., SIMS, P.A. & Harwood, D.M. 2011. Rutilariaceae redefined: a review of fossil bipolar diatom genera with centrally positioned linking structures, with implications for the origin of pennate diatoms. European Journal of Phycology, 46(4): 378-398.   

 

ENTOMOLOGY

Bachman, S., Moat, J., Hill, A.W., de la Torre, J. & SCOTT, B. 2011. Supporting Red List threat assessments with GeoCAT: geospatial conservation assessment tool. Zookeys(150): 117-126.   

 

BAKER, E. & Michel, E. 2011. Data standards, sense and stability: Scratchpads, the ICZN and ZooBank. Zookeys(150): 167-176.   

 

BRAKE, I., Duin, D., Van de Velde, I., SMITH, V.S. & RYCROFT, S.D. 2011. Who learns from whom? Supporting users and developers of a major biodiversity e-infrastructure. Zookeys(150): 177-192.   

 

Fikacek, M., BARCLAY, M.V.L. & Perkins, P.D. 2011. Two new species of the Epimetopus mendeli species group and notes on its adult and larval morphology (Coleoptera: Hydrophiloidea: Epimetopidae). Acta Entomologica Musei Nationalis Pragae, 51(2): 477-504.   

 

Henry, C.S., BROOKS, S.J., Duelli, P., Johnson, J.B., Wells, M.M. & Mochizuki, A. 2012. Parallel evolution in courtship songs of North American and European green lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 105(4): 776-796

 

Hernandez-Suarez, E., MARTIN, J.H., Gill, R.J., Bedford, I.D., Malumphy, C.P., Betancort, J.A.R. & Carnero, A. 2012. The Aleyrodidae (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha) of the Canary Islands with special reference to Aleyrodes, Siphoninus, and the challenges of puparial morphology in Bemisia. Zootaxa(3212): 1-76

 

Lopez-Vaamonde, C., Breman, F.C., LEES, D.C., Van Houdt, J. & De Prins, J. 2012. Analysis of tissue dependent DNA yield for optimal sampling of micro-moths in large-scale biodiversity surveys. European Journal of Entomology, 109(1): 1-6.   

 

Lotter, A.F., Heiri, O., BROOKS, S., van Leeuwen, J.F.N., Eicher, U. & Ammann, B. 2012. Rapid summer temperature changes during Termination 1a: high-resolution multi-proxy climate reconstructions from Gerzensee (Switzerland). Quaternary Science Reviews, 36: 103-113.   

 

Penev, L., LYAL, C.H.C., Weitzman, A., Morse, D.R., King, D., Sautter, G., Georgiev, T., Morris, R.A., Catapano, T. & Agosti, D. 2011. XML schemas and mark-up practices of taxonomic literature. Zookeys(150): 89-116.   

 

Sheng, M.L., BROAD, G.R. & Sun, S.P. 2011. Two new species of genus Ateleute Forster (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae) with a key to the Oriental species. Zookeys(141): 53-64.   

 

Shevtsova, E. & HANSSON, C. 2011. Species recognition through wing interference patterns (WIPs) in Achrysocharoides Girault (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) including two new species. Zookeys(154): 9-30.   

 

SHUBERT, E. 2011. Does phenotypic plasticity amplify the biodiversity signal? European Journal of Phycology, 46: 42-43.   

 

SHUBERT, E. 2011. Systematics and biodiversity: a journal devoted to whole-organism biology. European Journal of Phycology, 46: 187-187.   

 

SMITH, V.S. & Penev, L. 2011. Collaborative electronic infrastructures to accelerate taxonomic research. Zookeys(150): 1-3.   

 

SMITH, V.S., RYCROFT, S.D., BRAKE, I., SCOTT, B., BAKER, E., LIVERMORE, L., BLAGODEROV, V. & ROBERTS, D. 2011. Scratchpads 2.0: a Virtual Research Environment supporting scholarly collaboration, communication and data publication in biodiversity science. Zookeys(150): 53-70.   

 

VANE-WRIGHT, R.I. & TENNENT, W.J. 2011. Colour and size variation in Junonia villida (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae): subspecies or phenotypic plasticity? Systematics and Biodiversity, 9(4): 289-305.   

 

ZOOLOGY

CLAREMONT, M., REID, D.G. & WILLIAMS, S.T. 2012. Speciation and dietary specialization in Drupa, a genus of predatory marine snails (Gastropoda: Muricidae). Zoologica Scripta, 41(2): 137-149.   

 

Dang, F., Wang, W.X. & RAINBOW, P.S. 2012. Unifying Prolonged Copper Exposure, Accumulation, and Toxicity from Food and Water in a Marine Fish. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(6): 3465-3471.   

 

Davies, A.J., Hosein, S. & MERRETT, N.R. 2012. Haematozoans from deep water fishes trawled off the Cape Verde Islands and over the Porcupine Seabight, with a revision of species within the genus Desseria (Adeleorina: Haemogregarinidae). Folia Parasitologica, 59(1): 1-11.   

 

Fitze, P.S., Gonzalez-Jimena, V., San-Jose, L.M., MAURO, D.S., Aragon, P., Suarez, T. & Zardoya, R. 2011. Integrative analyses of speciation and divergence in Psammodromus hispanicus (Squamata: Lacertidae). BMC Evolutionary Biology, 11.   

 

HARTIKAINEN, H. & OKAMURA, B. 2012. Castrating parasites and colonial hosts. Parasitology, 139(4): 547-556.   

 

Kundu, S., Jones, C.G., PRYS-JONES, R.P. & Groombridge, J.J. 2012. The evolution of the Indian Ocean parrots (Psittaciformes): Extinction, adaptive radiation and eustacy. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 62(1): 296-305.   

 

OLSON, P.D., ZAROWIECKI, M., Kiss, F. & Brehm, K. 2012. Cestode genomics - progress and prospects for advancing basic and applied aspects of flatworm biology. Parasite Immunology, 34(2-3): 130-150.   

 

REID, D.G., DYAL, P. & WILLIAMS, S.T. 2012. A global molecular phylogeny of 147 periwinkle species (Gastropoda, Littorininae). Zoologica Scripta, 41(2): 125-136.   

 

von Reumont, B.M., JENNER, R.A., Wills, M.A., Dell'Ampio, E., Pass, G., Ebersberger, I., Meyer, B., Koenemann, S., Iliffe, T.M., Stamatakis, A., Niehuis, O., Meusemann, K. & Misof, B. 2012. Pancrustacean Phylogeny in the Light of New Phylogenomic Data: Support for Remipedia as the Possible Sister Group of Hexapoda. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 29(3): 1031-1045.   

 

WILLIAMS, S.T., HALL, A. & KUKLINSKI, P. 2012. Unraveling cryptic diversity in the Indo-West Pacific gastropod genus Lunella (Turbinidae) using elliptic Fourier analysis. American Malacological Bulletin, 30(1): 189-206.   

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Palaeontology Seminar

Posted by C Lowry Apr 24, 2012

Palaeontology Seminar

 

Floral palaeoecology of the Middle Jurassic of Argentina using palynological analysis and its potential application to hydrocarbon exploration

 

 

Thursday 26th April
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, 16:00

 

 

Dr. Stephen Stukins, Department of Palaeontology, NHM

 

 

Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions using palynology are often based upon allochthonous sporomorphs but often fail to take into account how transportation and depositional processes alter the assemblages, leading to misinterpretations. To resolve this, a methodology has been developed that aims to eliminate the bias of the sedimentation process and gives a new interpretation on palaeoenvironmental analysis. This talk reviews the approach using a case study from the Middle Jurassic of the Neuquén Basin, Argentina.

 

The findings show a dynamic ecosystem with broad ecological trends, one opposing the static models of vegetation ecology often presented from palaeo scenarios. In addition, the palaeoenvironmental analysis is combined with sedimentological and geochemical parameters to give an insight into future predictive models for the exploration of complex, marginal marine deposits such as those witnessed in the stunning outcrops of the Lajas Formation.

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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As part of the Annual NHM Integrated Pest Management Awareness

   

Thursday 26th April 2012

2.30pm - 4.00pm

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington London, SW7 5BD

 

Armando Mendez, Suzanne Ryder and David A. Smith from the Natural History Museum


Regular trapping and periodical inspections alerted Natural History Museum’s IPM Group to a rise in the number of webbing clothes moths, Tineola bisselliella, in the Museum’s Mammal corridor in late 2010.  This awareness led to the combined use of pheromone lure traps and a new visual display of trapping data.  This was used with the collections management system KE-EMu  to closely follow the evolution of the infestation.

 

At the time, a rodent infestation was discovered in a Museum themed gallery, quite distant from the original moth infestation. However, in this rodent location, Tineola moths were also discovered in textile materials contaminated by rodents. The use of pheromone traps and digital cameras proved that both infestations were linked and that there was a strong possibility that the moths were thriving in the welcoming environment created by the rodents. The pests were using under-floor ventilation ducts to move around the Museum’s public galleries, posing a threat to the Mammal specimens on display in those galleries.

 

To deal with the problems, the Museum’s IPM group coordinated the efforts of several teams to apply remedies based on IPM principles and best practice.Housekeeping, Design & Installation and Estates maintenance teams are working together, coordinated by the IPM group, to control this infestation. A trial of a new pheromone distraction product is also underway.

 

  • The seminar is open to all museum professionals. We welcome colleagues from other institutions who would find the seminar of interest. There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.
  • NHM staff from Science Group and Public Engagement Group are encouraged to attend, whether managers, collections management staff or those who work with and use collections or manage staff who work with collections.

 

Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.

 

Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk


NHM, Collection Management Seminar (see NHM Website for further details on how to attend http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html).

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Zoology Seminar

Posted by C Lowry Apr 11, 2012

Zoology Seminar


Integrating Molecules and Morphology: Consensus or Conflict in the Symbiotic Copepods?

 

Rony HUYS
Department of Zoology, NHM

 

TUESDAY 17th April, 12pm

Neil Chalmers Science Seminar Room (DC.LG16)

 


No group of plants or animals on Earth exhibits the range of morphological diversity as seen among the extant Crustacea. This structural disparity is best demonstrated by the symbiotic Copepoda. Given their moderately high host specificity in conjunction with the incredible spectrum of potential marine hosts, it is highly conceivable that parasitic copepods significantly outnumber their free-living counterparts in species diversity. Their successful colonization or utilization of virtually every metazoan phylum has generated a great diversity in copepod body morphology, which is arguably unparalleled among the Crustacea. For example, some highly modified copepods such as the polychaete-associated Herpyllobiidae and Melinnacheridae lack any external trace that could positively identify their crustacean affinity and their divergent body plans defy any attempts to place them in a higher level classification on morphological grounds alone. Other families such as the Monstrillidae and Thaumatopsyllidae demonstrate how extremely powerful natural selection can be in shaping morphology to meet functional needs so that distantly related taxa may appear uncannily similar. Small subunit ribosomal sequence data (18S rDNA) can help resolving some of the controversial issues that had reached a temporary impasse in the phylogeny and classification of the symbiotic copepods, such as the placement of the Monstrillidae and Thaumatopsyllidae, the paraphyly of the Cyclopoida and the origin of parasitism in the freshwater environment. Examples will be given that demonstrate the usefulness of such data in the classification of highly transformed and morphologically reduced taxa, the inference of colonization events and the placement of incertae sedis known exclusively from juvenile stages. I will present evidence that illustrates how the use of 18S sequence data can lead to the discovery of previously overlooked morphological characters and how they can potentially impact on the ordinal level classification of the Copepoda.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Palaeontology Department Seminar

 

Taking a deep breath: bones, air sacs and the evolution of archosaur respiratory systems

 

Dr. Paul Barrett, Department of Palaeontology, NHM

 

Thursday 12th April
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2,

16:00

 

 

Birds have highly specialised respiratory systems that involve unidirectional movement of air through stiff, small lungs and a complex system of associated air sacs. These air sacs invade many postcranial skeletal elements during development, leaving characteristic traces. Similar features are present in many saurischian dinosaurs, and it seems likely that the accompanying soft-tissue features were present in these animals too. More vexed is the question of how ancient these features are and whether they had a wider distribution among archosaurs. A survey of numerous extinct and extant archosaurs shows unambiguous evidence for an ancient origin of these bird-like features, with their presence in many bird-line archosaurs. The possession of air sacs in crocodile-line archosaurs is more difficult to determine, but some features of the bony anatomy, and recently published work on the physiology of living crocodiles, suggests that many features formerly considered to be unique to birds actually had a much wider distribution. This has several interesting implications for the evolution of activity levels and locomotion in both bird- and croc-line archosaurs.

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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