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October 2012
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Life Sciences Seminar

Posted by C Lowry Oct 23, 2012

Australia’s forgotten spider hunters –

Systematics and biology of pompilid wasps (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae)

 

 

Lars Krogmann

Dep.of Entomology, State Museum of Natural History, Stuttgart, Germany

Friday 26th of October 11:00

Sir Neil Chalmers seminar room, Darwin Centre LG16 (below Attenborough studio)

 

Spider wasps (Pompilidae) is a distinctive group of wasps of rather homogeneous morphology and biology. Female wasps search for spiders which they paralyse and provide as food for their developing larvae. Pompilids are recognised as one of the most difficult wasp groups in terms of species taxonomy and from the point of view of phylogeny and classification. The Australian fauna is highly diverse but still largely unknown with an estimate of 500-600 species of spider wasps, about 60% of which are still undescribed. The generic level classification of described taxa is extremely chaotic and the absence of identification keys has rendered the Australian fauna largely inaccessible for biological research for more than two centuries. The subfamily Pepsinae comprises the poorest studied Australian genera, many of which were described on the basis of a single specimen. Numerous pepsine genera exhibit a striking level of sexual dimorphism, which complicates sex associations. A generic level revision of the Australian Pompilidae is presented along with information on their biodiversity and biogeography. After this revision, 49 pompilid genera are recognized in four subfamilies, which are diagnosed and included in a comprehensive identification key. Five genera are described as new, in addition to five that are newly recorded and six that are excluded from the Australian fauna. Large amounts of new distributional data and new host records have been collected based on museum collections and recent fieldwork. Among the new host records is the infamous redback spider (Latrodectus hasselti), which was found to be parasitized by a species of the newly revised pompilid genus Agenioideus.

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Collection Management Seminar

 

What?

A Quantum of Control – Collecting and Preserving Natural History Collections

 

When?

Thursday 25th October 2012, 2.30pm-4.00pm

Where?

Flett Lecture Theatre, NHM, South Kensington

 

Who? Speakers: 
Chris Collins, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, South Kensington, London, SW7 5BD.

 

What’s it about?

Modern Collections are a rich resource for scientists who wish to undertake large-scale analysis of our natural world. As techniques develop so an increasing number of these collections come within reach of molecular genomic analysis or interpretation through improving imaging or other analytical techniques. The role of conservation is to ensure the preservation of an object in as close a state as possible to its collection condition (or entry in the museum) while maintaining its physical access to the widest (legal) possible range of users. In doing this we have some difficult decisions to make all of which will compromise the specimen and its access.

 

 

The museum continues to use a range of techniques to collect and preserve specimens, yet most of the processes used to stabilize especially organic objects are poorly understood and have a major influence on the preservation of objects for current and future research. So what do we know about the techniques we use, and what can collectors and other staff do to ensure the better preservation of their collections. Better understanding of deterioration processes, improved planning between collection, research and estates could enhance both the conditions in which the collections are preserved, the data sets we strive to preserve for research and also enhance our science outreach. This talk looks at the range of techniques and standards we use, the ethics that bound the field and future techniques that could improve the data sets we collect.  It also discusses how museums can use approaches in conservation to better integrate our preservation, educational, scientific services to improve access to collections for all users of the museum. 

 

 

Who should come?

The seminar is open to all members of the museum but it is suggested that the following staff will find the seminar most useful.

 

 

Science Group: All senior departmental managers & collection management staff.

 

 

Public Engagement Group:  Any staff who work with and use collections or manage staff who work with collections.

 

We also welcome colleagues from other institutions who would find the seminar of interest. There is no booking fee and only large parties need to notify the organiser for catering purposes.

Tea and coffee will be available in the seminar room lobby area after the talk.

Suggestions for seminar speakers are always most welcome. Please contact the organiser Clare Valentine (c.valentine@nhm.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Tuesday 23rd October
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room (DC2. LG16), 11:00

 

Biodiversity through Time – Why Understanding the Rock Record Matters

Dr Andrew SMITH, Earth Sciences, The Natural History Museum

This seminar is part of the new MRes course jointly organised by UCL, the NHM and the IoZ. Although this is primarily for the benefit of the MRes students, if you would like to attend, please feel free to do so. 

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html

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Some metals are an essential part of the metabolism of living organisms - Iron, Calcium, Sodium and Potassium, for example.  Others can be poisonous in the short term or over time - Lead and Mercury are both familiar examples. 

 

However, the impact of these toxic metals depends first on the way in which they behave in chemical terms in the environment - whether they are available to be absorbed by the organism (bioavailable).  Second, it depends on the way in which they are treated by the organism once absorbed.  Some toxic metals are easily excreted by organisms; others can gradually accumulate to the point of toxic effect over time; yet others may be bound up by proteins and rendered non-toxic to be stored in relatively inert form inside the organism (bioaccumulation) so organisms can be described as tolerant of the toxic metals and may survive in polluted environments.

 

It has been proposed that the bioaccumulated concentrations of toxic metals in tolerant biomonitor organisms can be used as indicators of metal bioavailability - where bioaccumulated concentrations are high, bioavailability is high.  This could be used to predict the ecological impact of those metals on groups of organisms that are more sensitive to metal pollution - direct measurement of low levels of metal pollution impact over time for sensitive organisms is both difficult and expensive.

 

Phil Rainbow, Sam Luoma, Brian Smith (Life Sciences) and colleagues addressed this proposal in the mining-affected streams of Cornwall. Mines operated over many years, now disused, have resulted in soil and stream pollution by metal-rich tailings and ore. 

 

Their hypothesis was that metal concentrations in the caddisfly larvae Hydropsyche siltalai and Plectrocnemia conspersa, as tolerant biomonitors, indicate metal bioavailability in contaminated streams, and can be calibrated against metal-specific ecological responses of more sensitive mayflies. Bioaccumulated concentrations of Copper, Arsenic, Zinc and Lead in H. siltalai from Cornish streams were measured and related to the mayfly assemblage.

 

Caddis NaturalHistoryMuseum_PictureLibrary_002034_Comp.jpg

Caddisfly larva - showing its protective case made of stones and vegetation

 

They found that Mayflies were always sparse where bioavailabilities (measured from caddis) were high.  However, mayflies were abundant and diverse where bioavailabilities of all metals were low.  This was particularly evident when the combined abundance of two particular groups of mayflies (heptageniid and ephemerellid) was measured.

 

The results offer promise that bioaccumulated concentrations of metals in tolerant biomonitors can be used to diagnose ecological impacts on stream benthos (organisms living on the stream bed) from metal stress.

 



P.S. Rainbow, A.G. Hildrew, B.D. Smith, T. Geatches and S.N. Luoma (2012). Caddisflies as biomonitors identifying thresholds of toxic metal bioavailability that affect the stream benthos. Environmental Pollution 166, 196-207.mayfly NaturalHistoryMuseum_PictureLibrary_002019_Comp-1.jpg

Ephemera danica - the larva of a mayfly

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The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is an international agreement under the UN umbrella that focuses on biodiversity information, conservation and sustainable use. Most of the World's countries have signed up to the CBD since it was initiated in 1992. It represents a common understanding of what biodiversity is; who owns and controls genetic resources; what information is needed to protect biodiversity and make decisions about its use; and how countries work together on all sorts of issues.

 

Dr Chris Lyal of the NHM has developed a lot of expertise on policy,  collaboration and capacity building under the CBD.  He is the focal  point for the UK for the Global Taxonomy Initative, a CBD programme that  aims to share taxonomic information and expertise. As a scientist, Chris is an expert on the taxonomy of weevils, a group of beetles that are significant crop pests - this involves deep knowledge of classification, naming and description of new species from around the world.

 

The Conference of the Parties to CBD (COP) is held every couple of years and COP 11 is currently being held in Hyderabad in central India.  Chris is there on behalf of the  NHM and has been in discussion with delegates from governments and other organisations on the science behind biodiversity and CBD initiatives.

 

One of the foci for CBD is invasive species.  There have always been natural patterns of change in the distribution of plants and animals. However, when humans cause species to be introduced - by accident or design - to new areas of the World they can cause major impacts.  They may become pests on crops or cause unexpected declines in natural biodiversity, for example, and can have huge economic costs. 

 

A new Global Invasive Alien Species Information Partnership has been formed to share and develop information on invasive species and to support development of expertise. Chris Lyal attended the inaugural signing of the partnership agreement and will be leading the NHM's contribution.

 

Chris at COP.jpg

Chris (standing) signing the GIASIP agreement on behalf of the NHM


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Recent Publications

Posted by C Lowry Oct 10, 2012

Publications for the previous 4 weeks (Search done 4th October)

Search on the basis of ‘Nat SAME Hist SAME Mus* SAME Lon* using Web of Science + TRING

EARTH SCIENCES

ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL MINERALOGY

Jimeno-Romero, A., BERHANU, D., Reip, P., Oron, M., Gilliland, D., VALSAMI-JONES, E., Cajaraville, M.P., Warley, A., Marigomez, I. & Soto, M. 2012. Down the rabbit hole: Subcellular localization and x-ray microanalysis of a set of metallic nanoparticles in mussels. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 163(1): S23-S24.  [Abstract]

Jimeno-Romero, A., BERHANU, D., VALSAMI-JONES, E., Reip, P., Cajaraville, M.P., Warley, A., Marigomez, I. & Soto, M. 2012. Cell and tissue level biomarkers, bioaccumulation and subcellular localization of CuO nanoparticles in mussels. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 163(1): S11-S11.  [Abstract]

Katsumiti, A., BERHANU, D., VALSAMI-JONES, E., Gilliland, D., Oron, M., Reip, P. & Cajaraville, M.P. 2012. Screening of cytotoxicity effects of different metal bearing nanoparticles on mussel hemocytes and gill cells in vitro. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 163(1): S25-S25.  [Abstract]

KHAN, F.R., MISRA, S.K., GARCIA-ALONSO, J., SMITH, B.D., STREKOPYTOV, S., RAINBOW, P.S., LUOMA, S.N. & VALSAMI-JONES, E. 2012. Bioaccumulation Dynamics and Modeling in an Estuarine Invertebrate Following Aqueous Exposure to Nanosized and Dissolved Silver. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(14): 7621-7628. 

Maslennikov, V.V., Ayupova, N.R., HERRINGTON, R.J., Danyushevskiy, L.V. & Large, R.R. 2012. Ferruginous and manganiferous haloes around massive sulphide deposits of the Urals. Ore Geology Reviews, 47: 5-41. 

Turner, R., Siidra, O.I., RUMSEY, M.S., Krivovichev, S.V., STANLEY, C.J. & SPRATT, J. 2012. Hereroite and vladkrivovichevite: two novel lead oxychlorides from the Kombat mine, Namibia. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(4): 883-890

Vicario-Pares, U., Lacave, J.M., Retuerto, A., BERHANU, D., VALSAMI-JONES, E., Oron, M., Reip, P., Gilliland, D., Cajaraville, M.P. & Orbea, A. 2012. Developmental toxicity of metal bearing nanoparticles (NPs) on zebrafish embryos. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 163(1): S57-S58.  [Abstract]

 

 

INVERTEBRATES AND PLANTS

Friedman, M. & JOHANSON, Z. 2012. †Opisthomyzon glaronensis (Wettstein, 1886) (Acanthomorpha, †Opisthomyzonidae), a junior synonym of †Uropteryx elongatus Agassiz, 1844. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 32(5): 1202-1206. 

Vahtera, V., EDGECOMBE, G.D. & Giribet, G. 2012. Spiracle structure in scolopendromorph centipedes (Chilopoda: Scolopendromorpha) and its contribution to phylogenetics. Zoomorphology, 131(3): 225-248. 

MINERAL AND PLANETARY SCIENCES

Abernethy, F.A.J., Verchovsky, A.B., Anand, M., Franchi, I.A. & GRADY, M.M. 2012. A trapped nitrogen component in angrites. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A36-A36.  [Abstract]

Alexander, C.M.O., Bowden, R., Fogel, M.L., HOWARD, K.T., Herd, C.D.K. & Nittler, L.R. 2012. The Provenances of Asteroids, and Their Contributions to the Volatile Inventories of the Terrestrial Planets. Science, 337(6095): 721-723. 

BERRY, A.J., SCHOFIELD, P.F., DOYLE, P.M., Knight, K.S., Mosselmans, J.F.W., Walker, A.M., Seymour, V.R. & Ashbrook, S.E. 2012. The oxidation state of titanium in hibonite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A67-A67.    [Abstract]

GISCARD, M.D., Hammond, S.J., Bland, P.A., Benedix, G.K., Rogers, N.W., RUSSELL, S.S., Genge, M.J. & Rehkamper, M. 2012. Trace element composition of metal and sulphides in iron meteorites determined using ICP-MS. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A149-A149.  [Abstract]

HUNT, A.C., Benedix, G.K., Hammond, S. & Bland, P.A. 2012. Constraining the precursor composition of the winonaite parent body using geochemical data. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A204-A204.  [Abstract]

Kampf, A.R., Mills, S.J., RUMSEY, M.S., SPRATT, J. & Favreau, G. 2012. The crystal structure determination and redefinition of matulaite, Fe3+Al7(PO4)4(PO3OH)2(OH)8(H2O)8•8H2O. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(3): 517-534. 

Kleppe, A.K., WELCH, M.D., Crichton, W.A. & Jephcoat, A.P. 2012. Phase transitions in hydroxide perovskites: a Raman spectroscopic study of stottite, FeGe(OH)6, to 21 GPa. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(4): 949-962. 

LAI, Y.J., von Strandmann, P., Elliott, T., RUSSELL, S.S. & Brooker, R.A. 2012. Magnesium stable isotope composition of the earth and chondrites. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A235-A235.  [Abstract]

Nestola, F., Pasqual, D., WELCH, M.D. & Oberti, R. 2012. The effects of composition upon the high-pressure behaviour of amphiboles: compression of gedrite to 7 GPa and a comparison with anthophyllite and proto-amphibole. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(4): 987-995. 

SMITH, C.L. & AHMED, F. 2012. X-ray microtomography of the Tissint Martian Meteorite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A352-A352.  [Abstract]

SMITH, C.L., KEARSLEY, A.T., Bermingham, K.R., Deacon, G.L., Kurahashi, E., Franchi, I.A. & Bevan, A.W.R. 2012. Lynch 002: A New Lunar Meteorite From The Nullarbor Desert, Western Australia. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A353-A353.  [Abstract]

STEPHEN, N.R., Genge, M. & RUSSELL, S. 2012. The Tissint Meteorite: A Pristine And Unique Sample Of The Martian Sub-Surface? Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A359-A359.  [Abstract]

Tomkinson, T., Lee, M.R., Mark, D.F., Stuart, F.M. & SMITH, C.L. 2012. Shock Enhanced Dissolution Of Olivine In The Martian Crust - Evidence From The Nakhla Meteorite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A380-A380.  [Abstract]

Towner, M.C., Bland, P.A., Spurny, P., BENEDIX, G.K., Dyl, K., Bevan, A.W.R. & Vaughan, D. 2012. Towards A Digital Desert Fireball Network For Meteorite Recovery. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A382-A382.  [Abstract]

Turner, R., Siidra, O.I., RUMSEY, M.S., Krivovichev, S.V., STANLEY, C.J. & SPRATT, J. 2012. Hereroite and vladkrivovichevite: two novel lead oxychlorides from the Kombat mine, Namibia. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(4): 883-890. 

Wright, I.P., Abernethy, F.A.J., Verchovsky, A.B. & GRADY, M.M. 2012. Carbon And Nitrogen Systematics Of The Tissint Meteorite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A416-A416.  [Abstract]

 

VERTEBRATES, ANTHROPOLOGY & MICROPALAEONTOLOGY

Lowe, J., Barton, N., Blockley, S., Ramsey, C.B., Cullen, V.L., Davies, W., Gamble, C., Grant, K., Hardiman, M., Housley, R., Lane, C.S., Lee, S., LEWIS, M., MacLeod, A., Menzies, M., Muller, W., Pollard, M., Price, C., Roberts, A.P., Rohling, E.J., Satow, C., Smith, V.C., STRINGER, C.B., Tomlinson, E.L., White, D., Albert, P., Arienzo, I., Barker, G., Boric, S., Carandente, A., Civetta, L., Ferrier, C., Guadelli, J.L., Karkanas, P., Koumouzelis, M., Muller, U.C., Orsi, G., Pross, J., Rosi, M., Shalamanov-Korobar, L., Sirakov, N. & Tzedakis, P.C. 2012. Volcanic ash layers illuminate the resilience of Neanderthals and early modern humans to natural hazards. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(34): 13532-13537. 

YOUNG, M.T., Rayfield, E.J., Holliday, C.M., Witmer, L.M., Button, D.J., Upchurch, P. & BARRETT, P.M. 2012. Cranial biomechanics of Diplodocus (Dinosauria, Sauropoda): testing hypotheses of feeding behaviour in an extinct megaherbivore. Naturwissenschaften, 99(8): 637-643. 

 

 

 

LIFE SCIENCES 

 

AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES

KHAN, F.R., MISRA, S.K., GARCIA-ALONSO, J., SMITH, B.D., STREKOPYTOV, S., RAINBOW, P.S., LUOMA, S.N. & VALSAMI-JONES, E. 2012. Bioaccumulation Dynamics and Modeling in an Estuarine Invertebrate Following Aqueous Exposure to Nanosized and Dissolved Silver. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(14): 7621-7628.

Kim, I.H. & HUYS, R. 2012. Sabelliphilidae (Copepoda: Cyclopoida) associated with the tube anemone Pachycerianthus maua (Carlgren) and the horseshoe worm Phoronis australis Haswell off New Caledonia. Systematic Parasitology, 83(1): 51-64. 

Law, R.J., Barry, J., Barber, J.L., Bersuder, P., Deaville, R., Reid, R.J., Brownlow, A., Penrose, R., Barnett, J., Loveridge, J., SMITH, B. & Jepson, P.D. 2012. Contaminants in cetaceans from UK waters: Status as assessed within the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme from 1990 to 2008. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 64(7): 1485-1494. 

Sharma, P.P., Gonzalez, V.L., Kawauchi, G.Y., Andrade, S.C.S., Guzman, A., Collins, T.M., GLOVER, E.A., Harper, E.M., Healy, J.M., Mikkelsen, P.M., TAYLOR, J.D., Bieler, R. & Giribet, G. 2012. Phylogenetic analysis of four nuclear protein-encoding genes largely corroborates the traditional classification of Bivalvia (Mollusca). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 65(1): 64-74. 

Suarez-Morales, E. & BOXSHALL, G.A. 2012. A new species of Sabellacheres  M. Sars, 1862 (Copepoda: Gastrodelphyidae) from a deep-water benthic polychaete in Antarctic waters, with a key to the species of the genus. Systematic Parasitology, 83(1): 65-75. 

WOODALL, L.C., Jones, R., Zimmerman, B., Guillaume, S., Stubbington, T., SHAW, P. & Koldewey, H.J. 2012. Partial fin-clipping as an effective tool for tissue sampling seahorses, Hippocampus spp. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 92(6): 1427-1432. 

 

 

GENOMIC AND MICROBIAL DIVERSITY

BERGSTEN, J., Bilton, D., FUJISAWA, T., ELLIOTT, M., Monaghan, M., Balke, M., Hendrich, L., Geijer, J., Herrmann, J., Foster, G., Ribera, I., Nilsson, A., Barraclough, T. & VOGLER, A. 2012. The Effect of Geographical Scale of Sampling on DNA Barcoding. Systematic Biology, 61(5): 851-869. doi: 10.1093/sysbio/sys037  

Gomes, D.F., Caldas, O., da Silva, E.M., Gell, P.A. & WILLIAMS, D.M. 2012. Father Zimmermann (1871-1950): the first Brazilian diatomist. Diatom Research, 27(3): 177-188. 

MURRIA, C., Bonada, N., Arnedo, M.A., Zamora-Munoz, C., Prat, N. & VOGLER, A.P. 2012. Phylogenetic and ecological structure of Mediterranean caddisfly communities at various spatio-temporal scales. Journal of Biogeography, 39(9): 1621-1632. 

PARASITES & VECTORS

BRAY, R.A. & Justine, J.L. 2012. Further reports of Acanthocolpidae Luhe, 1906 (Digenea) from fishes off New Caledonia, with descriptions of two new species. Systematic Parasitology, 83(1): 39-50. 

BRAY, R.A. & Justine, J.L. 2012. A review of the Lepocreadiidae (Digenea, Lepocreadioidea) from fishes of the waters around New Caledonia. Acta Parasitologica, 57(3): 247-272. 

HARBACH, R.E., KITCHING, I.J., CULVERWELL, C.L., DUBOIS, J. & LINTON, Y.M. 2012. Phylogeny of mosquitoes of tribe Culicini (Diptera: Culicidae) based on morphological diversity. Zoologica Scripta, 41(5): 499-514. 

Parreira, R., COOK, S., Lopes, A., de Matos, A.P., de Almeida, A.P.G., Piedade, J. & Esteves, A. 2012. Genetic characterization of an insect-specific flavivirus isolated from Culex theileri mosquitoes collected in southern Portugal. Virus Research, 167(2): 152-161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virusres.2012.04.010

Poddubnaya, L.G., Brunanska, M., Swiderski, Z. & GIBSON, D.I. 2012. Ultrastructure of the vitellarium in the digeneans Phyllodistomum angulatum (Plagiorchiida, Gorgoderidae) and Azygia lucii (Strigeida, Azygiidae). Acta Parasitologica, 57(3): 235-246. 

Stevenson, J., St Laurent, B., Lobo, N.F., Cooke, M.K., Kahindi, S.C., Oriango, R.M., HARBACH, R.E., Cox, J. & Drakeley, C. 2012. Novel Vectors of Malaria Parasites in the Western Highlands of Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9): 1547-1549. 

Tchuente, L.A.T., Fouodo, C.J.K., Ngassam, R.I.K., Sumo, L., Noumedem, C.D., Kenfack, C.M., Gipwe, N.F., Nana, E.D., Stothard, J.R. & ROLLINSON, D. 2012. Evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) Urine-Tests for Diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Cameroon. Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 6(7). 

WARDHANA, A.H., HALL, M.J.R., MAHAMDALLIE, S.S., Cameron, M.M. & READY, P.D. 2012. Phylogenetics of the Old World screwworm fly and its significance for planning control and monitoring invasions in Asia. International Journal for Parasitology, 42(8): 729-738. 

 

 

PLANTS

Agudo, J.A.S., Martinez-Ortega, M.M., CAFFERTY, S. & Rico, E. 2012. A contribution toward clarifying the nomenclature of Veronica L. (Plantaginaceae). Taxon, 61(4): 867-870. 

HAWKSWORTH, D.L. 2012. Global species numbers of fungi: are tropical studies and molecular approaches contributing to a more robust estimate? Biodiversity and Conservation, 21(9): 2425-2433. 

Iamonico, D. & JARVIS, C.E. 2012. Lectotypification of two Linnaean names in Chenopodium L. (Chenopodiaceae). Taxon, 61(4): 864-865. 

 

 

TERRESTRIAL INVERTEBRATES

HARBACH, R.E., KITCHING, I.J., CULVERWELL, C.L., DUBOIS, J. & LINTON, Y.M. 2012. Phylogeny of mosquitoes of tribe Culicini (Diptera: Culicidae) based on morphological diversity. Zoologica Scripta, 41(5): 499-514. 

PONT, A.C. 2012. Distribution records of Helina Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera: Muscidae) from the Caucasus Mountains, with the descriptions of three new species. Zootaxa(3409): 30-46. 

 

 

VERTEBRATES

KHAN, F.R., MISRA, S.K., GARCIA-ALONSO, J., SMITH, B.D., STREKOPYTOV, S., RAINBOW, P.S., LUOMA, S.N. & VALSAMI-JONES, E. 2012. Bioaccumulation Dynamics and Modeling in an Estuarine Invertebrate Following Aqueous Exposure to Nanosized and Dissolved Silver. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(14): 7621-7628. 

Rodel, M.O., DOHERTY-BONE, T., Kouete, M.T., Janzen, P., Garrett, K., Browne, R., Gonwouo, N.L., Barej, M.F. & Sandberger, L. 2012. A new small Phrynobatrachus (Amphibia: Anura: Phrynobatrachidae) from southern Cameroon. Zootaxa(3431): 54-68. 

 

 

SCIENCE FACILITIES

 

IAC

Floss, C., Stadermann, F.J., KEARSLEY, A.T. & Burchell, M.J. 2012. Presolar grain abundances in 81P/Wild 2. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A130-A130.  [Abstract]

GISCARD, M.D., Hammond, S.J., Bland, P.A., Benedix, G.K., Rogers, N.W., RUSSELL, S.S., Genge, M.J. & Rehkamper, M. 2012. Trace element composition of metal and sulphides in iron meteorites determined using ICP-MS. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A149-A149.  [Abstract]

Henkel, T., Price, M.C., Cole, M.J., Burchell, M.J., Lyon, I.C. & KEARSLEY, A.T. 2012. Understanding the modification of organic chemistry by impact at 6 km/s onto Al-Foil. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A176-A176.  [Abstract]

Kampf, A.R., Mills, S.J., RUMSEY, M.S., SPRATT, J. & Favreau, G. 2012. The crystal structure determination and redefinition of matulaite, Fe3+Al7(PO4)4(PO3OH)2(OH)8(H2O)8•8H2O. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(3): 517-534. 

KHAN, F.R., MISRA, S.K., GARCIA-ALONSO, J., SMITH, B.D., STREKOPYTOV, S., RAINBOW, P.S., LUOMA, S.N. & VALSAMI-JONES, E. 2012. Bioaccumulation Dynamics and Modeling in an Estuarine Invertebrate Following Aqueous Exposure to Nanosized and Dissolved Silver. Environmental Science & Technology, 46(14): 7621-7628. 

Martin, R.S., Sawyer, G.M., Day, J.A., LE BLOND, J.S., Ilyinskaya, E. & Oppenheimer, C. 2012. High-resolution size distributions and emission fluxes of trace elements from Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 117

SMITH, C.L. & AHMED, F. 2012. X-ray microtomography of the Tissint Martian Meteorite. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A352-A352.  [Abstract]

SMITH, C.L., KEARSLEY, A.T., Bermingham, K.R., Deacon, G.L., Kurahashi, E., Franchi, I.A. & Bevan, A.W.R. 2012. Lynch 002: A New Lunar Meteorite From The Nullarbor Desert, Western Australia. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 47: A353-A353.  [Abstract]

Turner, R., Siidra, O.I., RUMSEY, M.S., Krivovichev, S.V., STANLEY, C.J. & SPRATT, J. 2012. Hereroite and vladkrivovichevite: two novel lead oxychlorides from the Kombat mine, Namibia. Mineralogical Magazine, 76(4): 883-890. 

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Palaeontology Seminar

Thursday 4th October
Neil Chalmers Seminar Room, DC2, 16:00

A star performance from a fossil show: Terminaster megaungulus, a new species of forcipulatid Asteroid from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian) of Morocco and its significance

 

 

Dr. Timothy A. M. Ewin, Earth Sciences, The Natural History Museum

 

Since 2011, staff from the palaeontological section of The Natural History Museum, have joined their mineralogical counterparts at commercial mineral and fossil shows. It was at the Munich 2011 show that 11 blocks containing over 40 articulated starfish specimens, from the Lower Cretaceous of Agadir, Morocco, were purchased.

 

Articulated fossil starfish are rare but vital for classification and elucidating higher taxonomy. As such, any new material is of significance. Furthermore, the phylogeny of post Palaeozoic asteroids is controversial, with two competing hypothesis as to the position of the extant orders Forcipulatida and Paxillosida. Which have both been regarded as either basal or derived. The material has enabled the description of a new species, Terminaster megaungulus n. sp., which was classified as the second member of the recently erected family Terminasteridae Gale 2012. The position of the Terminasteridae has been controversial, however the new material supports a stem-ward position of this family within the Forcipulatida. Furthermore, this material will provide vital new characters (particularly the pedicellaria) to inform the position of the Order Forcipulatida within post Palaeozoic Asteroids. This discovery also greatly expands the stratigraphical and geographical range of this characteristic family.

 

This project is therefore a great example of the type of significant material that can be purchased at these shows and how advantageous it is for The Natural History Museum to be involved.

 

 

For additional details on attending this or other seminars see http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/seminars-events/index.html