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The discovery of hydrothermal vents in the late 1970s triggered an  enormous biological interest in chemoautotrophic organisms dependant on  previously unknown symbioses with sulphide and methane oxidising  bacteria. Molluscs, particularly bivalves, are the most diverse and  widespread group of chemosymbiotic animals ranging from the intertidal  to hadal depths. Thirteen international speakers will review the  biology, diversity, evolution,host-symbiont interactions and habitats of  these molluscs.

 

The Malacological Society of London and Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum, are organising a meeting 7 - 8 April 2011 Chemosymbiotic molluscs and their environments: from intertidal to hydrothermal vents at The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD

 

1000-1800h, 7 April 2011, Flett Theatre
1000-1300h, 8 April 2011, Sir Neil Chalmers Seminar Room

 

No registration fee but for catering purposes PLEASE LET US KNOW IN ADVANCE if you will be attending.

 

Organisers and contact: John Taylor and Emily Glover  j.taylor@nhm.ac.uk

 

 

Speakers and titles

 

  • Sarah Samadi (Systématique, Adaptation et Evolution, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris) ‘Mytilids associated with sunken wood shed new light on the evolution of Bathymodiolinae’
  • Sebastien Duperron (Systématique, Adaptation et Evolution, Université Pierre & Marie Curie, Paris) ‘Connectivity and flexibility of mussel symbioses: how to cope with fragmented and variable habitats?’
  • Nicole Dubilier (Max Planck Institute of Marine Microbiology, Bremen) ‘The unrecognized diversity of bacterial symbionts in chemosymbiotic molluscs’
  • Clara Rodrigues (Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal) ‘Chemosymbiotic bivalves from mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz: an overview’
  • Graham Oliver (National Museum of Wales, Cardiff) ‘Thyasiridae: the known and the unknown: setting priorities for future research’
  • Heiko Sahling (Geosciences, University of Bremen) ‘The geological and geochemical environment of vesicomyid clams’
  • Elena Krylova (Institute of Oceanology, Moscow) ‘Vesicomyidae (Bivalvia): current systematics and distribution’
  • Steffen Kiel (Geobiology, University of Göttingen) ‘The fossil history of chemosymbiotic bivalves’
  • John Taylor and Emily Glover (Zoology, NHM London) ‘Ancient chemosymbioses – contrasting diversification histories of Lucinidae and Solemyidae’
  • Olivier Gros (Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, Guadeloupe) ‘Codakia orbicularis gill-endosymbiont produces quorum-sensing signals of the AHLclass: putative impact on the bacterial population control in lucinids’
  • Caroline Verna (Max Planck Institute of Marine Microbiology, Bremen) ‘Lucinid symbiont diversity: influence of host selection, geography, habitat and depth’
  • Jenna Judge (Integrative Biology, University of California Berkeley) ‘Testing diversification processes in chemosymbiotic gastropods: a phylogenetic approach’
  • Adrian Glover (Zoology, NHM London) 'Chemosynthetic ecosystems of the Antarctic: a test of dispersal'
  • Paul Dando Marine Biological Association, Plymouth "Fjord thyasirid populations and sediment geochemistry"
  • Matthijs van der Geest (Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research) "Ecological importance of chemoautotrophic lucinid bivalves in the Banc d'Arguin (Mauritania) intertidal ecosystem"
  • Karina van der Heijden (Max Planck Institute of Marine Microbiology, Bremen) ‘Biogeography of Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent mussels and associated bacterial symbionts’
  • Graham Oliver & John Taylor 'First confirmation of bacterial symbiosis in Nucinellidae'
  • John Hartley (Hartley Anderson Ltd, Aberdeen) ’Chemosynthetic bivalve responses to oil contamination around North Sea wells and platforms’
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