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Ash
Bogbean
Comfrey
Dandelion
Dock
Elder
Houseleek
Ivy
Mallow
Nettle
Ribwort plantain
Thyme
Yarrow
Mallow
Malva sylvestris
Mallow
Perennial herb, growing on disturbed and waste ground, roadsides, and around farm buildings, where it may have been encouraged for veterinary use.

'Mallow was used by the family as a cure for cuts. An uncle whilst in Australia was bitten by a snake (species unknown!) and swore he had recovered through using mallow on it, whilst a cousin who jumped onto an upturned nail with the wound turning bad was nursed by my grandfather with mallow on the wound, which healed beautifully.'
Pershore, Worcestershire, 1991

Mallow
'In Cornwall, when we were young, mother bathed our eyes with liquid from the boiled leaves of mallow if we had any eye complaints.'
Alicante, Spain, 1991

Mallow is recorded as being used to treat bruises, 'bladder complaints', sores and sprains. Unripe seeds, known as 'bread and cheese', are widely eaten by children. Practitioners of herbal medicine prefer to use the mallow's close relative the marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) to treat many ailments, but they consider mallow to be better as a laxative.




Cures featured in this exhibition and on the website should be used only with advice from a qualified medical herbalist.