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Ash
Bogbean
Comfrey
Dandelion
Dock
Elder
Houseleek
Ivy
Mallow
Nettle
Ribwort plantain
Thyme
Yarrow
Comfrey
Symphytum spp.
Comfrey
Robust perennial herb, growing on stream banks, road verges and waste ground. Formerly cultivated in cottage gardens for its medical properties.

'Comfrey leaves spread on arthritis will soothe the pain and take any inflammation out.'
Omagh, Co. Tyrone, 1986

Comfrey

'My cousin had an ulcer on her leg from ankle to knee. Ointment from the doctor did her no good. Someone told her to bathe the leg with comfrey – boiling the leaves – two or three times a day. In just a week it had gone down to [the size of] a postage stamp.'
Windermere, Cumbria, 1988

'My husband reminded me that when he was a Casualty Officer in the Royal Hospital Sheffield, in the 1950s, it was not uncommon for patients suffering from suspected breakages and sprains to arrive at hospital with the affected bones swathed in comfrey leaves, held in place by bandages.'
Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, 2002


Tired feet can be refreshed with comfrey, which is also used to treat rheumatism and 'hens which are doing poorly'. Practitioners of herbal medicine use it to treat a range of illnesses, including gastric and duodenal ulcers, sprains and athlete's foot.




Cures featured in this exhibition and on the website should be used only with advice from a qualified medical herbalist.