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Belemnites:

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belemnite

World Folklore

Scotland
In Scotland, the earliest mention of belemnites dates from 1703 where they are referred to as botstones (Martin 1703). They were used medicinally by some Scots to cure horses of the worms that caused distemper - the remedy was water that had been steeped in belemnites (Oakley 1974).

China
In Chinese folklore belemnites are known as Jien-shih or sword stones .

Scandanavia
Scandinavian folklore regards belemnites as candles belonging to elves, gnomes and pixies. In some areas they are still called vateljus which in Swedish literally means gnomes' lights.

Egypt
Objects resembling belemnites appear in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic inscriptions symbolising the god, Min. According to Newberry (1910), fossil belemnites and certain arrowheads were cult-objects in the Egyptian Middle Kingdom. They represented thunderbolts and by association, the deity Min.

Russia
Fragments of altered amber-coloured belemnites with fine perforations were found at a 20,000-year-old archaeological site known as Kostenki 17 on the Don river in Russia (Boriskovskii 1956). They may have been used as charms.

Germany
Belemnites are known by many different names in German folklore. Among these are  Alpschoß (nightmare shot), Fingerstein (finger stone), Gespensterkerze (ghostly candle),and  Katzenkegel (cat's skittle).

 

   
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