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Antarctic conservation blog archive

There is light

Emily, Monday 20 July 2009

Weather today: clear sky, full moon, -50 to -24°C, 10 knots of wind

When my family and friends learned I was going to spend 6 months experiencing the Antarctic winter, their main concern was how I would survive the cold and 24 hour darkness. People gave me all the tips they could think of with the hope I would return home safe and sound, both physically and mentally.

Regardless of how challenging people said it would be, I actually looked forward to 24 hour darkness. I believed that moonlight, auroras and night skies would be just as wonderful as sunlight.

Green ribbons dancing in the sky © Antarctic Heritage Trust

Green ribbons dancing in the sky © Antarctic Heritage Trust

I have to admit, it was a bit difficult to get up in the morning back in May when daylight started to disappear. Luckily, I got used to it pretty soon and I now find I don’t mind the darkness at all.

Looking carefully at the sky, I know it is not really dark all the time. On clear days there is always dim light above the horizon around noon, giving the lower eastern sky a dark blue tint. And now that the sun will be back in just one month (from August to Sept), the dark blue is turning into a warm burgundy colour.

Occasionally these already beautiful scenes are lit up with an aurora dancing in the dark sky.

There was still light in the sky on mid-winter's day © Antarctic Heritage Trust

There was still light in the sky on mid-winter’s day © Antarctic Heritage Trust

Red sky and burgundy clouds - the sun will return soon © Antarctic Heritage Trust

Red sky and burgundy clouds - the sun will return soon © Antarctic Heritage Trust

A lot of people are looking forward to the return of the sun, but I am not so sure I’m ready to trade these gorgeous sights for that big bright object in the sky….

One Response to “There is light”

  1. mika says:

    hi the pics look awsome plz send more in.

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