Cherry tree factsheets

These factsheets have information about the groups or species of cherry tree you can identify for the urban tree survey.

You can use the factsheets to find out more about each species or group of species, and to check your identifications.

  • Bird cherry
    Bird cherries

    This group of trees gets its name from the fact that birds enjoy their fruits so much.

  • Fuji cherry
    Fuji cherry

    They have white or pink flowers on hairy stalks, in clusters of 2–4, and the leaf edges have pointed teeth.

  • Japanese cherry
    Japanese cherries

    These cherries have white flowers in clusters of 2–6, and the leaves may be hairless or downy on the underside but the leaf stalks are hairless.

  • Morello cherry
    Morello cherry

    These trees have white, saucer-shaped flowers and leaves that are glossy on the upper surface but hairless on the underside.

  • Rum cherry
    Rum cherry

    Their white flowers are in spikes of 10 or more, and the leaves have orange or rusty-coloured hairs on the underside.

  • Spring cherry
    Spring cherries

    These cherries have pink flowers on hairy stalks, in cluster of 2–5.

  • St Lucie cherry
    St Lucie cherries

    These trees have white flowers in clusters of 10 or fewer, and the leaf edges have blunt or rounded teeth.

  • Tibetan cherry
    Tibetan cherry

    These cherries have white flowers in clusters of 2–3, the leaves have pointed teeth and the bark is very glossy.

  • Wild cherry
    Wild cherry

    Wild cherry trees have white, cup-shaped flowers in clusters of 2–6.

  • Cherry blossom
    Cherries

    Cherries are easiest to spot in spring due to their colourful blossom.