Stringer's Homo britannicus book wins award

13 November 2008

Homo britannicus, a book by Natural History Museum human origins expert Chris Stringer, wins Best Archaeological Book 2008 this week.

The prestigious award, given by the British Archaeological Awards, is for publications that help people learn about the past and that introduce archaeology to new audiences.

'Homo britannicus weaves together natural and human history in an engrossing and relevant way. It is valuable and topical in giving the effects of climate change a new perspective.' - British Archaeological Awards

Homo britannicus book

Stringer's book tells the story of ancient humans in Britain through the work of the Ancient Human Occupation of Britain Project (AHOB)

From harsh ice-age conditions where ancient humans lived alongside woolly rhinos, to warmer times with sabre-toothed cats and hippos, Homo britannicus reveals the complete history of Britain's human life for the first time.

The book also reveals the detective work involved in piecing together the clues that explain who ancient humans were, and how they lived.

Breakthroughs
One of over 30 flint tools found at Pakefield near Lowestoft belonging to humans living in Britain 7

One of over 30 flint tools found at Pakefield near Lowestoft belonging to humans living in Britain 700,000 years ago.

More recent archaeological breakthroughs are covered in the book too. Stringer describes how fossil and archaeological evidence from the Pakefield site near Lowestoft, UK, helped AHOB to date the earliest known human occupation to 700,000 years ago. This is 200,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Stringer says of winning the award, 'The award was also a tribute to the work of AHOB and to the Leverhulme Trust, who funded the project.'

 

The British Archaeological Awards began in 1976 and every two years they give awards for different aspects of archaeological work in Britain.