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Nothing boring about Museum water source

02 May 2006

Water conservation is something we should all be thinking about, especially when some areas of Britain, such as the South East are facing hosepipe bans this summer.

The Natural History Museum's East Lawn is watered by a borehole beneath the Wildlife Garden.

The Natural History Museum's East Lawn is watered by a borehole beneath the Wildlife Garden.

These restrictions should encourage us all to think about alternative, water-saving methods when watering our lawns, washing our cars and using water in our homes.

The Natural History Museum is lucky enough to have its own borehole underneath its Wildlife Garden. It uses the borehole to water its new lawn, in place of the grass removed for London Fashion Week last February.

The borehole is 150 metres deep and is also used for heating and ventilation systems, toilets, irrigation and cleaning across the Museum. The water from the borehole is not fit to drink because it's too salty.

The borehole means that the Museum cuts down on water costs as well as fulfilling its commitment to sustainability.

The Museum pays for a licence from the Environment Agency to take water from the borehole, and this covers the cost for the water treatment and pumping.