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Celebrating a naturally diverse world

05 October 2005

The Natural History Museum's Diverse City Season has begun and is running from the beginning of October through to December.

Celebrate diversity with the Museum's Diverse City Season

Celebrate diversity with the Museum's Diverse City Season

A programme of free events suitable for all ages, celebrating cultural diversity, the Diverse City Season has been developed by the Museum's New Audiences Team to help make the Museum more accessible to all people in the community.

'So many different people already enjoy visiting the Museum,' said Saira MacNicol, Head of New Audiences at the Natural History Museum. 'We are hoping that all the Museum's visitors will get involved in celebrating the importance of cultural diversity with this fantastic programme of events.'

Celebrate diversity with the Museum's Diverse City Season

Celebrate diversity with the Museum's Diverse City Season

African drumming, Asian dancing and music from the Caribbean are just some of the free fun events and Diverse City Season begins with Black History Month in October. Download the full programme of events from the link below.

A group of young people from a range of ethnic minority backgrounds have been asked to sketch a part of the Museum's collection that embraces their understanding of 'black history'. Their sketches were then transferred to a textile banner. At the end of the year, Ray Mahabir, a West Indian textile artist leading the project, will take the banner to a village in India where local female artisans will embroider the young people's designs onto the banners. The completed banner will then form part of a showcase exhibition, which the young people and their friends and families will be invited to view in April 2006. 

International collaboration
Some Diverse City Season events highlight the importance of international collaboration. Scientists from around the world are working together to improve understanding and awareness of treatments for medical conditions such as malaria, schistosomiasis and intestinal worms. Natural History Museum scientists undertaking research in these areas will be sharing their experiences with Museum visitors in the Darwin Centre.

Further Information