text only version
The collections are the basis for much advanced taxonomic work, and scientists around the world depend on them. A fossil of an extinct eurypterid (sea scorpion). This is one of a number of well-preserved specimens recently donated by Allan Langheinrich, the owner of a eurypterid quarry in New York State. Eurypterids were the largest aquatic arthropods to have lived, some reaching two metres in length.


The Director's view
2002/03 Highlights
The Darwin Centre
Our scientific research
The collections
Exhibitions
Sharing knowledge
Managing our assets
Museum supporters
2003 exhibitions and events
Financial review
Publications
Feedback
Museum contacts


Text only version
Previous Years' Reports


The collections
Opening up digital access

The Museum’s 100 curatorial staff are responsible for one of the world’s most important natural history collections, with over 70 million specimens.

Butterfly from the Museum's collectionsThe collections are the basis for much advanced taxonomic work, and scientists around the world depend on them. The completion of the Darwin Centre in 2007 will ensure their safekeeping for future generations of researchers.

Material from our collections is made widely available to exhibitions and researchers internationally. During the year, 56,523 specimens were loaned in this way. Our staff also undertake authoritative identifications and provide scientific advice to members of the public and organizations – 47,490 such requests and enquiries were dealt with in 2002/03.

We are in the early stages of an initiative to develop the standing of natural history collections. We will play a central role as the hub of a regional network of institutions across England, working collaboratively with them in key areas such as staff training, exhibition design and collections databasing.


next


[an error occurred while processing this directive] Return to the Museum's main home page Annual Report 2002/03 home page